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Author Topic: How did you find/get into Steampunk?  (Read 7448 times)
Melrose
Gunner
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Australia Australia



« Reply #25 on: February 25, 2018, 10:35:34 am »

You want a short answer, or would you rather settle into an armchair and sip absinthe for a while?  Grin I suppose I could dot point it.
My parents took me to the local drive-in theatre some time just after Disney's "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" came out. At that age (under 10) I was thrilled, and also terrified by the squid. I have it on DVD now and still revisit it, mainly for Nemo and his boat.
Aged about 10 (i.e about 1960) wheedled a Classics comic from parents every week or two. Shakespeare, Mark Twain, anything, but my favourites were "War of the Worlds", "Robur the Conqueror", "First Men on the Moon", "From the Earth to the Moon" and "20000 Leagues Under the Sea", not to mention "Alice in Wonderland", "The Red Badge of Courage" and "The Downfall". (I see a relevant thread elsewhere, http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,49455.0.html )
By early teens I had read the full "War of the Worlds" and a few others, as well as, in passing, a lot of Biggles. I began heading into science fiction and horror, notably H.P. Lovecraft and his school of confederates.
I stayed with horror and sci-fi, but in general led a sensible life, working, having a family, divorcing a couple of times, wearing occasional uniforms seriously, that sort of thing. I have learned that there is an alternative to sensible, though.
Now happily retired and finding my money goes further than it did when I was working, I've reviewed my habits and asked, why the blazes not? I started buying clothes I liked, for one thing. Initially, they had to be things I could wear without getting my sanity questioned, but I found myself liking things like waistcoats and fob watches with indecently exposed gears. I had heard of steampunk but, really, since I no longer have a car, couldn't chase around to any gatherings, if there were any, or explore shops several towns away.
I found a local steampunk shop, heaven help me, because I found a lot of things I wanted to buy. I found the first hat that ever fitted me perfectly, a top hat. Clearly, an omen.
I still had a mild dose of sensible. I bought clothes I could wear on most occasions, but, with a simple tweak - or by mixing several together - I had all kinds of steampunk possibilities. All it took was a top hat or a pith helmet, odd neckwear, a few feathers in a hatband, a fancy belt, and it stopped being ordinary. It's not just the clothes. The art appeals to me, and there's some good music out there too.
Now I just have to find a coven of steampunkers.
Okay, someone asked... now you know! Cheesy
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SolarCenturion
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United States United States


Stand a little less between me and the sun


« Reply #26 on: September 24, 2018, 10:20:18 pm »

I've appreciated steampunk literature since before it was called steampunk. Verne, H.G. Wells, etc. It always seemed to be different than regular sci-fi, which I also loved, but something about Victorian themes just grabbed me. In the 70's there was mini-series on TV, I can't believe some of the things that got past the censors on this one, called "Frankenstein, the True Story". It enthralled and horrified me all at once. It gave me both nightmares and fantastic dreams. It the first depiction of Victorian society that I understood was "Victorian Society".

Over the years, I've been just about every kind of punk there is, except for Nazi punk. I came to Brass Goggles in 2010 by way of the "Pyracy Pub", which no longer exists as a web site. They had a small section dedicated to "airship pirates" and steampunk and it brought me here.
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"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because
rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - George Orwell
newjack
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« Reply #27 on: May 18, 2019, 01:21:34 am »

i've always been a sci-fi fan since childhood... the "bad old days before star wars" where low budget movies were ruining EVERYTHING. to be honest, i'm more of a blade runner/A.I. artificial intelligence etc. modernist, but i grew up on steampunk which was what pretty much ALL big budget sci-fi seemed to be about back then...

the great race
20,000 leagues under the sea
the assassination bureau
the first men on the moon
the time machine
those magnificent men in their flying machines
&
around the world in 80 days.

i was just calling the era the "golden age" of steampunk in another thread
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Aetheric Aviatrix
Swab

United States United States



« Reply #28 on: November 12, 2019, 07:17:29 pm »

I’m curious, is anyone to here a fan of Final Fantasy 9? That was my favorite role playing game and one of my earliest introductions into the world of steampunk.
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Kensington Locke
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United States United States


« Reply #29 on: November 12, 2019, 11:25:58 pm »

I'd been aware of steampunk on the backburner of my mind for some time.

I'd read The Difference Engine in the late 90s I think. Probably the first book I distinctly recognize as steampunk that I'd read.  The Wild Wild West movie and League of Extraordinary Gentleman stood out at the time as well.

I've been a a rennie since high school, so it's surprising that it took so long to get into Steampunk costuming.  I started that around 2015 or so.

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Kieranfoy
Zeppelin Captain
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Australia Australia


Cthulhu ftaghn!


« Reply #30 on: November 13, 2019, 01:28:45 pm »

I believe my interest was first captured when I picked up a copy of a steampunk anthology in college (edited, coincidently, by Jeff Vandermeer, who wrote the somewhat mediocre books my favorite lovecraftian movie was based on). Didn't particularly catch on until later.
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Antipodean
Zeppelin Captain
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #31 on: November 14, 2019, 07:15:52 am »

As a non punk I discovered a beautifully steam punked keyboard on line and instantly/completely fell in love. “I MUST HAVE”.
But what is this title “Steam Punk” never heard of that before – so Hello Google.
There I found among other links – “Brass Goggles”.
Followed the link, started reading – Good grief – Everything here is me.
I am not alone in my enthusiasm for the Victorian made modern.
There is a place for people like me!
I have come home.
I now have a cool TAG – I am Steampunk!
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Synistor 303
Officer
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Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #32 on: November 15, 2019, 12:42:26 am »

As a non punk I discovered a beautifully steam punked keyboard on line and instantly/completely fell in love. “I MUST HAVE”.
But what is this title “Steam Punk” never heard of that before – so Hello Google.
There I found among other links – “Brass Goggles”.
Followed the link, started reading – Good grief – Everything here is me.
I am not alone in my enthusiasm for the Victorian made modern.
There is a place for people like me!
I have come home.
I now have a cool TAG – I am Steampunk!


Yep, that's pretty much how I found Steampunk.
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Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #33 on: November 15, 2019, 02:15:36 am »

As a non punk I discovered a beautifully steam punked keyboard on line and instantly/completely fell in love. “I MUST HAVE”.
But what is this title “Steam Punk” never heard of that before – so Hello Google.
There I found among other links – “Brass Goggles”.
Followed the link, started reading – Good grief – Everything here is me.
I am not alone in my enthusiasm for the Victorian made modern.
There is a place for people like me!
I have come home.
I now have a cool TAG – I am Steampunk!


Pretty similar experience for me, too, although Amelia Peabody helped along the way! And it fits so well for an anachronistic, autistic archaeologist!
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Deimos
Officer
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United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #34 on: January 08, 2020, 02:42:20 am »

Prelim comment....last post for this thread was last year. So.... am I necro-posting?  Wink

Well, whether I am or not....
Read a lot a what is now considered "classic" science fiction (Clarke, Asimov, Bradbury, Heinlein, Anderson, Ellison etc) when I was younger (a lot younger!).
I had see the movies that newjack listed in his post, or most of them anyway.
The  steampunk aspect never really attracted me, but it didn't repel me either. And I never watched the TV series Wild, Wild West, tho' a lot of my friends kept after me to watch it, said I would like it.
And I still haven't  seen the movie, the one with Will Smith, I think it is.

Discovered Sherlock Holmes stories when at university...I used the stories as light reading as an afternoon break when studying Physics, Calculus and Latin that first year.
I knew about Victorian London (I had seen a Christmas Carol and Oliver!  Roll Eyes Grin) but again I still wasn't really interested in the era.

Don't know what it was that the Conan Doyle stories triggered but it was like Boom! I fell for Victorian times.
Maybe it was  because I really liked --and still like --Sherlock Holmes, the person. (What? You didn't know that Sherlock Holmes was a real person? He was, and still is, most assuredly.  If you celebrate a person's birthday it follows that the person must have lived.)  

But at the same time I began to notice that things started looking a lot alike (as even now)...nothing had a distinctive look anymore, not cars or aeroplanes or trains, nor clocks or fans or lamps, nor clothes or hats or shoes, nor teapots and cups and saucers....or affordable houses (don't get me started on that one). And computers, most especially computers all look alike.

And I think it was one day in the late 2000's I typed in the word "retro[something]"  (and for the life of me I cannot recall what I was googling at the time) and up popped an image of a Datamancer keyboard. And I was fascinated by it. I kept staring at it thinking "I want one ... I want my computer to look old and retro, dammit, something right from 221B Baker Street."

And that one hit led me to Steampunk. And here I am.  Which is good because none of my friends or family are interested in it (altho' they do express genuine appreciation, even awe, at my projects.)  
  
    
 
                                                  
« Last Edit: January 08, 2020, 04:21:24 am by Deimos » Logged

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If you're alive, it isn't. -- Lauren Bacall
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #35 on: January 18, 2020, 05:19:30 am »



 Having always been a nostalgia buff, with a tendency to the interbellum era,  I stumbled upon Steampunk as a popular culture theme  while researching "tiki style nostalgia " for a polytechnic  paper assignment, a creative marketing plan  for a local pub, named after the colonial army Mile Stone  it was originally built near.

 The pub bar manager was keen, the owners weren't. The manager ended up working for the local  business association and the bar continued it's slide down hill.  The Mile Stone  rolled on as  a millstone
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Lunajammer
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #36 on: February 28, 2020, 06:05:47 pm »

I'm a graphic layout artist by trade, an antique enthusiast, a scrounging cheapskate and maker. Though I'd never heard of steampunk as a cultural movement until a few years ago, I'd been aware of the aesthetic. There's no way I could have avoided getting pulled in eventually. The internet has been paramount.

After a day of doing designs and layouts that make other people rich, it's nice to come home and use that momentum on my own projects where I enjoy creating faux antiques and art out of found objects. I'm too much a purist to ruin genuine antiques so replicating them according to my whimsey is most rewarding and this forum is a great source of creative info. Trying to adhere to period materials and sensibilities keeps me channeled and helps my work appear more authentic. What fun.
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