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Author Topic: Great Central Railway No.567; a New-Build 1890s Railway Locomotive  (Read 20526 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #75 on: June 18, 2020, 06:45:29 pm »

My Dear Monsieur Harrison -
thanks for keeping us up on this project, it is a rare treat and the dedication of the entire group is incredible!

I do have one dumb question - what fuel is to be used?  the high BTU but nasty coal, less nasty less polluting wood, or is it to be fitted to burn oil?

yhs
prof marvle

- but it was pointed out you could even just drop a lump of fissile material in her firebox and she'd steam merrily away, irradiating the landscape as she did so. 

That sounds like a splendid idea! Some people deploy nuclear powered missiles. And you can deploy nuclear powered locos! Both of them happily irradiating the landscape!  Grin
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James Harrison
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« Reply #76 on: July 11, 2020, 06:26:35 pm »

There's whisperings that some more parts now exist- albeit in timber rather than iron or steel- which suggests patternmaking in my opinion. 

Also, there may or may not be an opportunity to do some volunteering.  I've mentioned the tender before, which sits about a mile down the track and has trees growing out of it (the tank was converted to a sludge carrier and is completely shot).  One of the design team is making noises about needing gardeners to clean up around it so that the chassis and frames can be measured up for things like the steam heating pipes. 
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Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #77 on: July 14, 2020, 07:58:59 pm »

The yearly newsletter from the GCR-RST landed on the doormat this morning.  There's a lot of good news regarding Barnums #228 and #695.  #228's bogies are well advanced and, when they return, #695's will go away for refurbishment.  Then the internal restoration and fit out of #228 can get on in earnest, followed by #695. 

The Trust are actively seeking partners to either restore or take on some of the carriages; the National Railway Museum have taken back their Barnum (#666) reducing those at Ruddington to three.  This last has been taken to Quorn on the Great Central Railway and is now listed for disposal.  The RST have regretfully taken the decision that they can't take it on. 

The second six-wheeler #373, has been costed for professional third-party restoration at somewhere between £130,000 and £170,000.

The pair of arc-roof suburbans are also in this list. 

That still leaves the three Barnums, restored six-wheeler #946, and a clerestory carriage as the Group's main goals.  Of which work is either planned or progressing on two, the third will be a repeat of those, the fourth is a completed project, and the last is the Chairman's stated favourite of them all. 

There are also discussions to get the collection under permanent cover.  Ruddington's Building 4a, a carriage workshop capable of holding four vehicles, is well advanced.  The Group also has ideas for a Building 1, a one-road small museum, and also raised is the possibility of a Building 8- a dedicated RST carriage shed for those waiting their turn in the works. 
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