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Author Topic: GAAAAAHHHHHH Mk.VI: The Return of the Son of the 50ft GAAAH that struck back!  (Read 59964 times)
SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #1125 on: September 20, 2020, 04:16:30 am »

I have had an Oscar fish for 10 to 15 years, he's been looking a bit dikky for a few weeks now, medication not working, I decided this morning to stop the suffering in the most humane way I could, not a pleasant experience, but had to be done.

Now I have to re-stock the tank. Gaaaaagh!   £££££.........

Not to be morbid  --and if it would really distress you to answer this you need not reply Cry--- but how do you humanely euthanize a fish?

Clove oil then pithing.
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Deimos
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« Reply #1126 on: September 20, 2020, 10:39:51 am »

I have had an Oscar fish for 10 to 15 years, he's been looking a bit dikky for a few weeks now, medication not working, I decided this morning to stop the suffering in the most humane way I could, not a pleasant experience, but had to be done.

Now I have to re-stock the tank. Gaaaaagh!   £££££.........

Not to be morbid  --and if it would really distress you to answer this you need not reply Cry--- but how do you humanely euthanize a fish?

Clove oil then pithing.

Had to look up "pithing".... I guess it's humane, but it sure does sound like the way a Joe Pesci Goodfellas character would whack someone. Shocked
Good thing the fishies are already unconscious.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2020, 10:41:36 am by Deimos » Logged

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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #1127 on: September 20, 2020, 11:02:11 am »

I have had an Oscar fish for 10 to 15 years, he's been looking a bit dikky for a few weeks now, medication not working, I decided this morning to stop the suffering in the most humane way I could, not a pleasant experience, but had to be done.

Now I have to re-stock the tank. Gaaaaagh!   £££££.........


Not to be morbid  --and if it would really distress you to answer this you need not reply :'(--- but how do you humanely euthanize a fish?

Clove oil then pithing.


Had to look up "pithing".... I guess it's humane, but it sure does sound like the way a Joe Pesci Goodfellas character would whack someone. Shocked
Good thing the fishies are already unconscious.
The Clove oil does the job, if done right, pithing, spiking or iki-jime just makes sure. As I said before, not a pleasant task, I've only had to do it once before.
https://kb.rspca.org.au/knowledge-base/what-is-the-most-humane-way-to-euthanase-aquarium-fish/
There is some controversy about the spiking of whales tho, and I agree, should not happen!
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
I, like many others, am a meat and fish eater, some slaughter processes are not too humane but consumer demands provide the product whatever, please do not judge me, I'm being as kind as I can in the circumstances.

YHS.... SeVeN the slaughterer
« Last Edit: September 20, 2020, 12:10:36 pm by SeVeNeVeS » Logged
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« Reply #1128 on: September 20, 2020, 01:38:47 pm »

I have had an Oscar fish for 10 to 15 years, he's been looking a bit dikky for a few weeks now, medication not working, I decided this morning to stop the suffering in the most humane way I could, not a pleasant experience, but had to be done.

Now I have to re-stock the tank. Gaaaaagh!   £££££.........

Not to be morbid  --and if it would really distress you to answer this you need not reply Cry--- but how do you humanely euthanize a fish?

Clove oil then pithing.

Had to look up "pithing".... I guess it's humane, but it sure does sound like the way a Joe Pesci Goodfellas character would whack someone. Shocked
Good thing the fishies are already unconscious.

Just think of it as "aggressive lobotomy"  Roll Eyes
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rovingjack
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« Reply #1129 on: September 22, 2020, 09:43:12 pm »

spent the morning of my day off making eggs benedict, and taking video of the process, for breakfast... and to use the egg whites to whip so that they create an egg glair. Also did some recording of this too. I'm putting about half into an empty can and inverting it into a larger can so that the glair is left at the bottom of the larger can and I'm left with a can filled with the crusted foam (I'm going to experiment with carbonizing  it to see if it is a way I can use to make carbon foam) the other half I'm putting into a washed and reused ziplock bag, so I can take a tiny corner off to drain the glair, and be left with the foam, to test in other ways or maybe crush into powder and carbonize that for other experiments as well. All creative fun...

The hllandaise curdle while I was trying to manage the camera, but I managed to recover it, only for the memory card to run out of space, so I went and transferred file into the computer, where it tells me something is wrong with the card, So I salvage what I can from it. Back out to finish recording and back in to pull things off the card. And back out...

To find the idiot renting the spare bedroom has come home and dropped his groceries on the counter directly on top of the ziplock bag. He comments 'I see you're doing some recording of your kitchen adventures'. In my head I'm screaming "then why the ever loving  Lips sealed are you not using any of the other 7 empty surfaces in here?" while he tells me he's going to make a heap ton of boxed mac and cheese and how he needs to get more silverware, to which I respond with asking where is the silverware from the drawer... he doesn't know, he lost it. The silverware that belongs to the deceased mother of my friend and landlord.

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LukeHogbin
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« Reply #1130 on: September 23, 2020, 12:01:28 am »

And  Lips sealed like that is why I absolutely refuse to live with another person...
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« Reply #1131 on: September 23, 2020, 02:42:45 am »

And  Lips sealed like that is why I absolutely refuse to live with another person...

Ditto. Tongue
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Caledonian
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« Reply #1132 on: September 23, 2020, 10:42:59 pm »

If there isn't mildew/fungus actually showing on it you might be able to spread it and let it dry naturally then spray it with disinfectant and let it dry again?



I tried this, nothing visible and it doesn't smell weird so i guess...


for todays gaaaah
I can't find how to change my name with the university Sad
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« Reply #1133 on: September 23, 2020, 10:53:24 pm »

If there isn't mildew/fungus actually showing on it you might be able to spread it and let it dry naturally then spray it with disinfectant and let it dry again?



I tried this, nothing visible and it doesn't smell weird so i guess...


for todays gaaaah
I can't find how to change my name with the university Sad


It's a bit on the expensive side (about $40 on these parts!) , but dry cleaning it would be a healthy thing to do, even if you can't smell anything. Depending on the batting (the filling can be cotton, synthetic fibre or down, ie feathers), there's a bit of risk for the batting to be ruined (lumped), especially cotton batting, but otherwise it would clean the duvet from harmful mold.
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« Reply #1134 on: October 01, 2020, 05:08:04 pm »

I guess not very important in the grand scheme of things, but I just read that a survey estimated that 50% of all restaurants in Texas could close within 6 months without financial help. 75%of restaurant owners say that they don't expect business to return to normal any time soon. In April - May *alone* the industry in the state lost 700000 jobs.


The days of brick and mortar dining rooms are over.
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Deimos
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« Reply #1135 on: October 01, 2020, 08:32:48 pm »

I guess not very important in the grand scheme of things, but I just read that a survey estimated that 50% of all restaurants in Texas could close within 6 months without financial help. 75%of restaurant owners say that they don't expect business to return to normal any time soon. In April - May *alone* the industry in the state lost 700000 jobs.


The days of brick and mortar dining rooms are over.

 Sure, a lot, a heckuva lot of them will close permanently. But in three years when everyone will have been vaccinated , or herd immunity will have kicked in, (or whatever else will render the virus no different than seasonal illnesses), restaurants will come back. Yep, might be different ones, but they will come back.
Lots, LOTS, of people like eating out.
Care to bet?
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« Reply #1136 on: October 01, 2020, 10:24:09 pm »

I guess not very important in the grand scheme of things, but I just read that a survey estimated that 50% of all restaurants in Texas could close within 6 months without financial help. 75%of restaurant owners say that they don't expect business to return to normal any time soon. In April - May *alone* the industry in the state lost 700000 jobs.


The days of brick and mortar dining rooms are over.

 Sure, a lot, a heckuva lot of them will close permanently. But in three years when everyone will have been vaccinated , or herd immunity will have kicked in, (or whatever else will render the virus no different than seasonal illnesses), restaurants will come back. Yep, might be different ones, but they will come back.
Lots, LOTS, of people like eating out.
Care to bet?


I know we'll get back to normal at some point. I give it a couple of years too. Lots of great places will be gone though. Not that I ate a lot when living in the US, but there were some great places. Some for food, some for the ambience.

Here in Austin, North by Northwest, American Northwest warehouse-themed brewery was fantastic for food and beer (RIP).

I guess all needs to die eventually

The local branch of the Cheesecake Factory was straight out of the 1960s Cleopatra movie with Elizabeth Taylor. It also reminded me of the hotel /cruiser of The Fifth Element (it was a converted 3 storey high cinema) . It was the epitome of gaudiness  Grin but it was so entertaining  Grin

I guess I liked the theatricality of it all. It started approximating the intensity of the restaurants I knew when I was a child (and there were some incredible settings in the 1970s).
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« Reply #1137 on: October 01, 2020, 10:41:21 pm »

Speaking of 1970s restaurants, we used to have a thread of restaurants and Steampunk eateries in the geographical section... Some great places listed there..
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Deimos
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« Reply #1138 on: October 02, 2020, 04:02:24 am »


....

I know we'll get back to normal at some point. I give it a couple of years too. Lots of great places will be gone though. Not that I ate a lot when living in the US, but there were some great places. Some for food, some for the ambience.

We never ate out when I was growing up....no money to spare for that. Once in a great while a spinster aunt who was comparatively well off (because she wasn't raising a family) would take my eldest brother and me out to dinner at a nice restaurant...not a chain, which, btw were few and far between back then. In fact, the closest thing to a "chain restaurant" was several family owned places all in the same vicinity.
The place she took us was such that one had to "dress up" for it.

I didn't start going out to eat until I was well into my 20s.  That stopped when I learned that a bottle of wine for which I paid about $10 at the store cost about $28 in a restaurant. Now, if someone asks me out to dinner, well, of course I will readily accept  Grin.
I prefer to fix my own meals; I know exactly what is  (and is not) in the food I'm eating. Second bonus (the first being that it saves money) is that I don't gain weight. 
   


I guess all needs to die eventually

Haha...entropy always increases Grin

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« Reply #1139 on: October 02, 2020, 05:22:54 am »


....

I know we'll get back to normal at some point. I give it a couple of years too. Lots of great places will be gone though. Not that I ate a lot when living in the US, but there were some great places. Some for food, some for the ambience.

We never ate out when I was growing up....no money to spare for that. Once in a great while a spinster aunt who was comparatively well off (because she wasn't raising a family) would take my eldest brother and me out to dinner at a nice restaurant...not a chain, which, btw were few and far between back then. In fact, the closest thing to a "chain restaurant" was several family owned places all in the same vicinity.
The place she took us was such that one had to "dress up" for it.

I didn't start going out to eat until I was well into my 20s.  That stopped when I learned that a bottle of wine for which I paid about $10 at the store cost about $28 in a restaurant. Now, if someone asks me out to dinner, well, of course I will readily accept  Grin.
I prefer to fix my own meals; I know exactly what is  (and is not) in the food I'm eating. Second bonus (the first being that it saves money) is that I don't gain weight.  
  


I guess all needs to die eventually

Haha...entropy always increases Grin



There's also culture affecting that situation. My grandparents were relatively well off when I was a kid, so it was more common for me to go out (and you've seen the videos - you can't throw a rock without hitting a restaurant or eatery in CDMX). My grandmother loved to cook, so for most of the month we'd eat at home. But she was only good at cooking French and American food - she was the child of my French great grandmother and raised in New York, so it stands to reason, and precisely because she was a New Yorker, she loved to eat all kinds of food, but she was bit afraid of spicy food, so she sparingly cooked Mexican. If we really felt like Chinese or Mexican or anythng else we had to go out. She dabbled a bit on MX food, but was not her forte and knew not much of Asian food.

The culture in MX promoted eating out. No matter how poor (eg street food) or wealthy (linen table non chain), everybody in that country ate out. Literally everyone. It's mandatory for co-workers to go out and eat together. You see, "Lunch" is their heavy meal of the day, around 3 pm, as opposed to American style dinner at 6 pm. So the workday is interrupted by a major meal. Only very formal dinners like Christmas or special occasions happen at night, and then its very late at night, like 9pm!! School age friends met every weekend at someone's house before going out. Socialization is (or was) paramount in that society. No loners allowed. Things may have changed, IDK.

Of course, the best restaurants were non-chain restaurants - back in the 1970s you did not have too many chains, maybe KFC and Pizza Hut. Mc Donalds didn't arrive in the country until 1985 - that was an American thing. "American Casual Dining" did not exist back then at all. Today you can find a Little Caesars and Burger King in every corner - not to mention Starbucks. I know they have Benihana's in CDMX... I imagine every other conceivable restaurant chain is there too. But not back in those days.

But what I remember the most were these "hole in the wall" restaurants. An Argentinean steak house with dining patio completely open to a street intersection, smog and all - I got to bump into ome or two local TV celebrities there. A tiny German restaurant about 10 x 10 ft it seemed to me, half sunk into the pavement downtown. A little French restaurant hidden inside an office building, where the chef was this little old lady like you see in the Warner Brothers cartoons. A Spanish seafood restaurant in the suburbs themed after Pablo Picasso - now that was interesting! None of these were "fancy" per se. Not one diner wore a tie and suit. In the Spanish restaurant you sat on long benches. The walls were stuccoed with copies of Picasso's murals, and the kitchen was entirely open to the dining room. The restaurant was built on a strip shopping center built along the side of a bridge over a ravine, so you had these fantastic views of the ravine.

Then there was our Sunday tradition of eating Asian food. If not takeout, then we'd go visit my Italian Great Grandmother and take her out to a Polynesian restaurant - and that was the fancy kind of linen table restaurant - with a twist. The theme of "Mauna Loa" Restaurant was Pacific Island and they served Polynesian and Far East food. They hired and maintained a troop of professional Polynesian dancers, and in the late evenings in the central part of the (very large) dining room, would have compeptition dance-offs Hawaiian style and otherwise.

Then there was this "Scottish" restaurant named "Lancers" in a 70's business district. More or less shaped like a longhouse, and all sorts of Scottish memorabilia inside. Medieval armor, flags and coat of arms everywhere. Kind of looked like the hall at Hogwarts Tongue  A genuine British style pub. And because it was the mid 70s, waitresses in very *short* billie kilts (as a young boy you notice things like that  Roll Eyes) That was a favorite for "power lunches" (I wonder why?)

It took me many years to note the difference between countries (I really never though of it wile in college, I just though it was in the past). It's really a phenomenon. A way of life. The only other place that I know where food and going out are revered in that way is France and Italy. And places in Asia which I've never been to.

All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die. (OK, I'm being melodramatic  Grin)
« Last Edit: October 02, 2020, 05:30:51 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Synistor 303
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« Reply #1140 on: October 02, 2020, 05:40:11 am »

In Australia it was Greek and Italian food because of the influx of refugees after the second world war. Of course they didn't cook food from their home countries - that would have been way too terrifying for our grandparents. Instead they became great fish and chips experts. Then pizza. Then we got Asian food.

Not exactly an 'eat out' situation though. It was really frowned upon to take children to restaurants in the 60s and early 70s. Children were obscene and should not be heard. Most still are.

The cafe culture really hit Australia in the 1980s. I guess restaurant owners realised they could make more money catering more frequently to a whole family, rather than occasionally to a couple.
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Sorontar
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« Reply #1141 on: October 02, 2020, 05:49:10 am »

Just watched the 1940s episode of the ABC's version of Further Back in Time for Dinner. It was stressing the difference between the Roaring '20s, with wealth being displayed to the Depression of the '30s where you didn't have the wealth or the money for lavish food (or variety) to the '40s where due to WWII and the rations, it was not socially correct to show off your wealth nor eat big. So for the '20s you dressed up and partied but for the '30s and the '40s that was not practically or socially acceptable. While this was from the perspective of Australia, I am sure it resembled the practises of some other areas of the world during those years.

It will be interesting how much the social concept of "eating out" or "takeaway/takeout" food changes during the next year. There certainly is an increase in the food deleivery services, but people may not be able to afford that for much longer if their jobs aren't secure. The focus of youth employment may also change, due to less sit-down eating at places like Maccas.

Sorontar
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Deimos
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« Reply #1142 on: October 02, 2020, 09:05:05 am »

...
The culture in MX promoted eating out. No matter how poor (eg street food) or wealthy (linen table non chain), everybody in that country ate out. Literally everyone. It's mandatory for co-workers to go out and eat together. You see, "Lunch" is their heavy meal of the day, around 3 pm, as opposed to American style dinner at 6 pm. So the workday is interrupted by a major meal. Only very formal dinners like Christmas or special occasions happen at night, and then its very late at night, like 9pm!! School age friends met every weekend at someone's house before going out. Socialization is (or was) paramount in that society. No loners allowed. Things may have changed, IDK.

Of course, the best restaurants were non-chain restaurants - back in the 1970s you did not have too many chains, maybe KFC and Pizza Hut. Mc Donalds didn't arrive in the country until 1985 - that was an American thing. "American Casual Dining" did not exist back then at all. Today you can find a Little Caesars and Burger King in every corner - not to mention Starbucks. I know they have Benihana's in CDMX... I imagine every other conceivable restaurant chain is there too. But not back in those days.

I learned about those late eating hours favored by Europeans when a friend and I dined at The Hotel Coronado.
(We didn't stay there....not enough funds for that). Since it was a one time thing we decided to splurge at the Hotel's top tier restaurant.
So we "dress" (it's that kind of place....or was) and get to the dining room about 18:30 and......it's nearly empty.
The waiter (all wait staff were male) asked us where we would like to sit and we said next to the window with a view of the bay (well,doh!).
It was lovely.
I asked the waiter about the lack of diners and he said most of them were Europeans and would show up after 20:30.
We were having coffee and a sweet by that time and, sure enough, the place started to fill up  with "fer'ners" (jk).
We lingered until about 21:30  but heard a half dozen or so different languages being spoken.
It was quite the experience..... It felt like I was traveling abroad. Cheesy  


All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die. (OK, I'm being melodramatic  Grin)

Do Androids Dream of Electric Lamb Chops?
« Last Edit: October 02, 2020, 09:13:28 am by Deimos » Logged
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« Reply #1143 on: October 02, 2020, 12:55:37 pm »

Oooh. Lamb chops. Lamb chops good. With mint jelly.
I lived in San Diego for 7 years when we moved to the States. I've been to Hotel Coronado.

In Europe the "late lunch" at 2-3 pm (assumed to be a Southern European / Mediterranean thing) has been abandoned completely though. The reason is industrialization. Every worker in a developed country can barely afford to eat at noon. We were surprised to find out when we went to Europe in the early 80s. In France they did still keep a "siesta - like" break though. Most restaurants closed briefly around 2 pm.

The late dinner I don't know. The reasoning for MX is that the only way to eat a heavy meal after their 3 pm "afternoon dinner" is to wait past their traditional bread and fruit "night lunch" at 7pm, until 9 pm when the stomach is finally empty and you can eat a heavy meal again.. Those shifted eating habits precede the Industrial Revolution, so they tend to disappear over time. It may or may not have disappeared by now in parts of Latin America.
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« Reply #1144 on: October 02, 2020, 01:38:54 pm »

I'm currently working night shift, and since late July we've been working 6-day weeks. Today was supposed to be my first Friday off, and I was looking forward to getting some s#!t done. Last night there was a notice on the bulletin board that we would be working 6-day weeks for the next 5 weeks (skipping next week, which is Thanksgiving.)
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« Reply #1145 on: October 02, 2020, 01:46:19 pm »

In Australia it was Greek and Italian food because of the influx of refugees after the second world war. Of course they didn't cook food from their home countries - that would have been way too terrifying for our grandparents. Instead they became great fish and chips experts. Then pizza. Then we got Asian food.

Not exactly an 'eat out' situation though. It was really frowned upon to take children to restaurants in the 60s and early 70s. Children were obscene and should not be heard. Most still are.

The cafe culture really hit Australia in the 1980s. I guess restaurant owners realised they could make more money catering more frequently to a whole family, rather than occasionally to a couple.

It's interesting you say that about kids. I don't think I ever felt that either in the US or MX, Though admittedly fancier restaurants would be deemed "mostly adult." I was one of those "adult kids" though. Being a lone kid meant my grandparents took me almost everywhere they went, unless it was a bar or night show situation (they were very young still, in their mid 50s by the time I was10 years old).
Just watched the 1940s episode of the ABC's version of Further Back in Time for Dinner. It was stressing the difference between the Roaring '20s, with wealth being displayed to the Depression of the '30s where you didn't have the wealth or the money for lavish food (or variety) to the '40s where due to WWII and the rations, it was not socially correct to show off your wealth nor eat big. So for the '20s you dressed up and partied but for the '30s and the '40s that was not practically or socially acceptable. While this was from the perspective of Australia, I am sure it resembled the practises of some other areas of the world during those years.

It will be interesting how much the social concept of "eating out" or "takeaway/takeout" food changes during the next year. There certainly is an increase in the food deleivery services, but people may not be able to afford that for much longer if their jobs aren't secure. The focus of youth employment may also change, due to less sit-down eating at places like Maccas.

Sorontar

I think the Americas were greatly insulated from the effect of WWII though. The dust bowl did happen in the United States, but not in Mexico, so post market crash effects would only be felt in the US. The war did have an effect, but in Mexico it would have been felt less. That was the time the United States invited droves of Mexican farmers to work on the fields as most able bodied Americans were at war. Mexico did declare war against the Axis, but help was limited to a single squadron of fighters over the Pacific (Squadron 201 during the capture of the Phillipines in the summer of 1945).


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« Reply #1146 on: October 02, 2020, 01:49:30 pm »

I'm currently working night shift, and since late July we've been working 6-day weeks. Today was supposed to be my first Friday off, and I was looking forward to getting some s#!t done. Last night there was a notice on the bulletin board that we would be working 6-day weeks for the next 5 weeks (skipping next week, which is Thanksgiving.)

Sorry to hear that, but I least you got work... I used to work 6 day weeks from 2014 until Covid-19 hit. Now barely get 27 hours of work.
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« Reply #1147 on: October 02, 2020, 02:21:33 pm »

I'm currently working night shift, and since late July we've been working 6-day weeks. Today was supposed to be my first Friday off, and I was looking forward to getting some s#!t done. Last night there was a notice on the bulletin board that we would be working 6-day weeks for the next 5 weeks (skipping next week, which is Thanksgiving.)

Sorry to hear that, but I least you got work... I used to work 6 day weeks from 2014 until Covid-19 hit. Now barely get 27 hours of work.
There is that. My bank account is not complaining, just my web site. And my floors. And my laundry...
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rovingjack
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« Reply #1148 on: October 08, 2020, 07:13:38 am »

The Two weeks new assistant manager to me when I came in for my shift today: "You're working a double to close tonight." (I'm scheduled to leave at 5:30 pm)
 Me: I can't.
Him: You don't have a choice.

In my mind- Oh I have many choices. You are mistaking your lack of choices for what to do without an employee, for my problem and not one you made for yourself by deliberatly understaffing. You Need me, I tolerate you, at a price.

Me out loud: Not happening.
Him: I'm making some calls. (so apparently I hear that he called his boyfriend who manages a different branch, and then contacted the district manager.

I've already filed a complaint with the company, about his hostile attitude, and trying to get me in trouble with higherups.
We'll see how the next few days go. But I'm feeling like I might not even bother giving two weeks notice. Although theoretically if they opt to fire me I may qualify for unemployment.
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rovingjack
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States



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« Reply #1149 on: October 14, 2020, 07:57:15 am »

corporate HR has called me back and said they contacted the district manager to meet with me. lol. alright, lets do this. any which way this goes I'm actually fine with it at this point. If they are confrontational, they can just see how it goes being shorter staffed while I finally get that time away from the public that everybody else got for a few month earlier this year, but I was too essential for.

Update: guess who no called no showed at the appointed time today. Meanwhile the NAM is strutting around talking about what a joke I am, because he and his boyfriend are buddies with the district manager whose husband is on the labor board of the state we are in. All very cozy... except you see I'm a person with a disability, who has a spotless record, a bunch of buddies in the unions around here, and I know a few lawyers, and other state employees some who also work in the labor board. And frankly I don't care for bullies and those that imagine they can go unchallenged when they create a hostile workspace.

New Update: Called HR, they contacted the district manager, he rescheduled for today... no call, no showed. Alright then I see how serious the company takes filings of people who create hostile work environments. I'll play at this a bit longer before filing a complaint further up. I mean at this point it costs me nothing to just keep stacking them like traffic tickets he keeps stuffing in his glove box.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 12:35:05 am by rovingjack » Logged
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