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Author Topic: GAAAAAHHHHHH Mk.VI: The Return of the Son of the 50ft GAAAH that struck back!  (Read 58702 times)
LukeHogbin
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« Reply #1100 on: August 30, 2020, 12:08:05 pm »

Sounds more like your hard drive is failing if it needs hours for a reinstall.
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« Reply #1101 on: August 30, 2020, 01:22:10 pm »

the harddrive is a new replacement for the the last one that broke a few months ago.

Hours to reinstall seems to be an issue with installing updates while it reinstalls and it's use of internet connection while doing so. Apparently other have had installation times as long as 16 hours.

but at this point (10 hours in) I'm not sure if interrupting the reinstall is a good choice as the last time I did a reinstall that I had to interrupt it never let me save the existing data and only offered me the option to erase the drive and start over.
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LukeHogbin
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« Reply #1102 on: August 30, 2020, 06:11:08 pm »

That is why you don't allow updates to be downloaded & installed during the installation.
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« Reply #1103 on: August 30, 2020, 07:55:46 pm »

10 hours??

1. Check your RAM. The current Ubuntu versions (above version 10) don't run in less than 4GB of RAM. Version 9 runs well in 2GB.

2. You need to go to a place with a faster internet connection if you are downloading updates, and do those after you got the operating system running, including all the cosmetic adjustments you want.

Never, ever in any distro installation, Ubuntu, or any Debian based distro, Red Hat, Suze, Slackware on any CPU platform Intel, AMD 64, even VIA, with hard drives ranging from 160 GB to 500 GB, dating all the way back to 2003, have I ever seen an installation time that long. Only Windows,  installing in a very quaint system would take hours to install, but never Linux. I'd never spend more than 3 hours and that's will all the updates, bells and whistles. The basic installation for Ubuntu with a blank drive and not allowing for on the fly updates should be definitely less than an hour, no matter what. Half an hour, I would say.

Even using a "live" USB stick to install Ubuntu to a chromebook style PC, it shouldn't take more than an hour. The basic installation is copied from a CD /DVD or USB drive to your RAM, where a compressed copy of the operating is running, while it makes a copy of itself into your hard drive. It should still be less than 45 minutes, even for a mini ITX Via based motherboard (ie slow CPU).
« Last Edit: August 30, 2020, 08:22:54 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

rovingjack
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« Reply #1104 on: August 31, 2020, 03:11:17 am »

the transformer on a pole outside the house exploded this morning. knocking power out and sending flickering power into all my electronics, including my backup pcs. and also apparently when this house was remodled somebody sealed a hardwired smoke detector into the frikkin ceiling, which spent the day chirping after the flickering power and loss of power. all this comes on the tail of a double shift at work n my day off.

I'd say I should have stayed in bed but I woke after 5 hours sleep unable to fall back to sleep, and my only electronic device that can be used in bed it reinstalling ubuntu.
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LukeHogbin
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« Reply #1105 on: August 31, 2020, 03:59:47 am »

10 hours??

1. Check your RAM. The current Ubuntu versions (above version 10) don't run in less than 4GB of RAM. Version 9 runs well in 2GB.

2. You need to go to a place with a faster internet connection if you are downloading updates, and do those after you got the operating system running, including all the cosmetic adjustments you want.

Never, ever in any distro installation, Ubuntu, or any Debian based distro, Red Hat, Suze, Slackware on any CPU platform Intel, AMD 64, even VIA, with hard drives ranging from 160 GB to 500 GB, dating all the way back to 2003, have I ever seen an installation time that long. Only Windows,  installing in a very quaint system would take hours to install, but never Linux. I'd never spend more than 3 hours and that's will all the updates, bells and whistles. The basic installation for Ubuntu with a blank drive and not allowing for on the fly updates should be definitely less than an hour, no matter what. Half an hour, I would say.

Even using a "live" USB stick to install Ubuntu to a chromebook style PC, it shouldn't take more than an hour. The basic installation is copied from a CD /DVD or USB drive to your RAM, where a compressed copy of the operating is running, while it makes a copy of itself into your hard drive. It should still be less than 45 minutes, even for a mini ITX Via based motherboard (ie slow CPU).

You should've seen when I went to install Windows 95 on my old Toshiba T5200... it took about 8 hours in total.  Grin
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1106 on: August 31, 2020, 10:19:17 am »

10 hours??

1. Check your RAM. The current Ubuntu versions (above version 10) don't run in less than 4GB of RAM. Version 9 runs well in 2GB.

2. You need to go to a place with a faster internet connection if you are downloading updates, and do those after you got the operating system running, including all the cosmetic adjustments you want.

Never, ever in any distro installation, Ubuntu, or any Debian based distro, Red Hat, Suze, Slackware on any CPU platform Intel, AMD 64, even VIA, with hard drives ranging from 160 GB to 500 GB, dating all the way back to 2003, have I ever seen an installation time that long. Only Windows,  installing in a very quaint system would take hours to install, but never Linux. I'd never spend more than 3 hours and that's will all the updates, bells and whistles. The basic installation for Ubuntu with a blank drive and not allowing for on the fly updates should be definitely less than an hour, no matter what. Half an hour, I would say.

Even using a "live" USB stick to install Ubuntu to a chromebook style PC, it shouldn't take more than an hour. The basic installation is copied from a CD /DVD or USB drive to your RAM, where a compressed copy of the operating is running, while it makes a copy of itself into your hard drive. It should still be less than 45 minutes, even for a mini ITX Via based motherboard (ie slow CPU).

You should've seen when I went to install Windows 95 on my old Toshiba T5200... it took about 8 hours in total.  Grin

But you HAD to do it, right?  Grin We're determined to cram that OS into the damn machine!  Grin
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LukeHogbin
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« Reply #1107 on: August 31, 2020, 12:47:28 pm »

Well, I wanted to connect it to the school network. And that wouldn't work with Win 3.11 that originally ran on it.  Grin

(Still have that machine, and it's back to running Win 3.11 now, but a weird English/Arabic mix.)
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rovingjack
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« Reply #1108 on: September 01, 2020, 01:33:37 am »

well I stopped it at about 48 hours. Now it only allows me the option of creating a new partition . but when I try it tells me "the test of the file system withtype ext4 in partition #5 of scsi (0,0,0) (sda) found uncorrected errors" and to go back and correct them before continuing. and I haven't the foggiest idea what it's on about. this is literally the stupidest way to set anything up. it reminds me of trying to get anything done in dos.
recovery mode doesn't work as it askes for a manual fsck and unless I'm doing it wrong (fsck/ dev/ sda5) it returns a not found.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2020, 02:13:01 am by rovingjack » Logged
LukeHogbin
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« Reply #1109 on: September 01, 2020, 03:27:18 am »

48 hrs ? That seriously sounds like your hard drive has bought the farm, downloading updates or not.
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rovingjack
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« Reply #1110 on: September 01, 2020, 05:34:21 am »

except that it works fine records downloads that transfer fine to thumb drives and uploads things from the hard drive to the web just fine, Records video and livestreams just fine. literally everything works as it should with the exception that when the power goes out or it's shut down it doesn't boot into ubuntu, won't load in recovery mode, and doesn't take kindly to attempts to reinstall or create a partition. near as I've seen the hard drive which is new within a few weeks, functions as a hard drive, it's ubuntu that doesn't do it's job. now maybe i got a bum drive but outside of the problems of booting I've used it for weeks on end just fine by letting it sleep and running it in the background when not actively using it.
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Prof Marvel
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« Reply #1111 on: September 01, 2020, 08:12:55 am »

well I stopped it at about 48 hours. Now it only allows me the option of creating a new partition . but when I try it tells me "the test of the file system withtype ext4 in partition #5 of scsi (0,0,0) (sda) found uncorrected errors" and to go back and correct them before continuing. and I haven't the foggiest idea what it's on about. this is literally the stupidest way to set anything up. it reminds me of trying to get anything done in dos.
recovery mode doesn't work as it askes for a manual fsck and unless I'm doing it wrong (fsck/ dev/ sda5) it returns a not found.

well I stopped it at about 48 hours. Now it only allows me the option of creating a new partition . but when I try it tells me "the test of the file system withtype ext4 in partition #5 of scsi (0,0,0) (sda) found uncorrected errors" and to go back and correct them before continuing. and I haven't the foggiest idea what it's on about. this is literally the stupidest way to set anything up. it reminds me of trying to get anything done in dos.
recovery mode doesn't work as it askes for a manual fsck and unless I'm doing it wrong (fsck/ dev/ sda5) it returns a not found.

This sounds just like the wierd crap from early BSD Unix and some ancient forks of SUN Unix.

This suggests a problem between UBUNTU and the UNIX drivers for the drive.
I
except that it works fine records downloads that transfer fine to thumb drives and uploads things from the hard drive to the web just fine, Records video and livestreams just fine. literally everything works as it should with the exception that when the power goes out or it's shut down it doesn't boot into ubuntu, won't load in recovery mode, and doesn't take kindly to attempts to reinstall or create a partition.

without eyes on the hardware, I can only offer conjecture, and This sounds stupid, but are you sureyou have the right drivers for the proper SCSI drive?


yhs
prof marvel
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1112 on: September 01, 2020, 11:03:44 am »

except that it works fine records downloads that transfer fine to thumb drives and uploads things from the hard drive to the web just fine, Records video and livestreams just fine. literally everything works as it should with the exception that when the power goes out or it's shut down it doesn't boot into ubuntu, won't load in recovery mode, and doesn't take kindly to attempts to reinstall or create a partition. near as I've seen the hard drive which is new within a few weeks, functions as a hard drive, it's ubuntu that doesn't do it's job. now maybe i got a bum drive but outside of the problems of booting I've used it for weeks on end just fine by letting it sleep and running it in the background when not actively using it.

You have uttered the magic sentence "everything works as it should with the exception that when the power goes out or it's shut down it doesn't boot into ubuntu, it doesn't boot into recovery mode..."

There are two possible reasons for that, but NOTE THAT IT'S STILL NOT NORMAL FOR AN INSTALLATION TO TAKE HOURS. Your hard drive may very well be kaput, even after you read and execute all the suggestions below. If your hard drive only took the normal ½ hour to load Ubuntu, then the following is a very good guess of what is happening:

1. Have you checked that the Master Boot Record on your drive is not messed up? That is a hidden partition only accessible by software when you're preparing a disk to be used as a bootable device. The bit of hidden data tells the computer that the disk contains an operating system, and where to find it. That by the way is 100% independent from Linux. It's a legacy from the early days of PC's. There's special software you can use to repair the MBR, like Partition Commander (this is ancient software, BTW, but that's ancient software too which hard drives still use).

2. If the MBR is correctly configured, the next likely candidate is one of two tiny pieces of software which are used to "bootstrap" the operating system. They are referred to as "Boot Loaders" Think of it as pulling the starter cord in a two-stroke engine, before the cylinders get a little bit of fuel. There are 3 main kinds of boot loaders, and all can be made to work with an arbitrary Linux kernel.:

1. GRUB
2. LILO
3. Syslinux

I don't know which you have. Seem to remember it was Syslinux for Ubuntu.

One of these three is obsolete, my memory fails, so I forget, but it's probably LILO which was replaced by GRUB more than a decade ago. But anyhow, this bit of software is not hidden, and you should see it in your hard-drive root directory, assuming you can read it with another operating system (the installation disk in "demo" mode will do that, just don't install Linux, use the "live" OS running from your USB/optical disk. Then use the file browser to look at the lowest level of your hard drive.

You can get in trouble if you have more than one version of a boot loader in your hard-drive. Multiple installations of Linux will do that. The automated installation disk of Ubuntu may not be smart enough to figure out if the boot loader is messed up. So that would be a bug in the installation disk.

There are Live Linux disks like "Rescatux" (another ancient but effective bit of software) which will repair the boot loader or replace it as you wish. Rescatux is basically just another live Linux operating system that you don't install, it's decompressed from a disk or drive and runs in RAM, just like the Ubuntu disk. In other words, the disk is just used to demonically take over your computer to make the necessary repairs
« Last Edit: September 01, 2020, 11:12:32 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1113 on: September 01, 2020, 11:21:51 am »

well I stopped it at about 48 hours. Now it only allows me the option of creating a new partition . but when I try it tells me "the test of the file system withtype ext4 in partition #5 of scsi (0,0,0) (sda) found uncorrected errors" and to go back and correct them before continuing. and I haven't the foggiest idea what it's on about. this is literally the stupidest way to set anything up. it reminds me of trying to get anything done in dos.
recovery mode doesn't work as it askes for a manual fsck and unless I'm doing it wrong (fsck/ dev/ sda5) it returns a not found.

well I stopped it at about 48 hours. Now it only allows me the option of creating a new partition . but when I try it tells me "the test of the file system withtype ext4 in partition #5 of scsi (0,0,0) (sda) found uncorrected errors" and to go back and correct them before continuing. and I haven't the foggiest idea what it's on about. this is literally the stupidest way to set anything up. it reminds me of trying to get anything done in dos.
recovery mode doesn't work as it askes for a manual fsck and unless I'm doing it wrong (fsck/ dev/ sda5) it returns a not found.

This sounds just like the wierd crap from early BSD Unix and some ancient forks of SUN Unix.

This suggests a problem between UBUNTU and the UNIX drivers for the drive.
I
except that it works fine records downloads that transfer fine to thumb drives and uploads things from the hard drive to the web just fine, Records video and livestreams just fine. literally everything works as it should with the exception that when the power goes out or it's shut down it doesn't boot into ubuntu, won't load in recovery mode, and doesn't take kindly to attempts to reinstall or create a partition.

without eyes on the hardware, I can only offer conjecture, and This sounds stupid, but are you sureyou have the right drivers for the proper SCSI drive?


yhs
prof marvel

Unfortunately he's not installing Linux manually, but by way of the installation disk. It used to be that an installation software would ask you and tell you the names of the partitions, and whether you want to resize them, choose your swap space, etc, but as time went by Linux providers tried to make the installation more automated, so it's unclear to me if he'd have access to the information. What I fear is that the disk has installed multiple Linux kernels and the bootlosder(s) are now confused.
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Prof Marvel
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« Reply #1114 on: September 02, 2020, 01:55:51 am »


Unfortunately he's not installing Linux manually, but by way of the installation disk. It used to be that an installation software would ask you and tell you the names of the partitions, and whether you want to resize them, choose your swap space, etc, but as time went by Linux providers tried to make the installation more automated, so it's unclear to me if he'd have access to the information. What I fear is that the disk has installed multiple Linux kernels and the bootlosder(s) are now confused.

Ahhh You may have nailed it.
perhaps boot from a recovery dish tool, make a disk image for backup, and "fix" the grub/boot/whatever ?

yhs
prf forgot
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1115 on: September 02, 2020, 03:30:11 am »


Unfortunately he's not installing Linux manually, but by way of the installation disk. It used to be that an installation software would ask you and tell you the names of the partitions, and whether you want to resize them, choose your swap space, etc, but as time went by Linux providers tried to make the installation more automated, so it's unclear to me if he'd have access to the information. What I fear is that the disk has installed multiple Linux kernels and the bootlosder(s) are now confused.

Ahhh You may have nailed it.
perhaps boot from a recovery dish tool, make a disk image for backup, and "fix" the grub/boot/whatever ?

yhs
prf forgot
Technically, he can do all of this this from scratch except fixing the Master Boot Record, I just don't know if its worth his time. In the old days, as in 2003, I'd actually manually set the Master Boor Record, install the kernel and the bootloader of my choice o the root directory.. Boot into a text only shell and start the X-Window system manually before setting it up to bootstrap itself... Aaah! The old days!
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Caledonian
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« Reply #1116 on: September 14, 2020, 11:56:09 pm »

My duvet came back from storage damp Sad
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1117 on: September 15, 2020, 03:08:32 am »

My duvet came back from storage damp Sad

Sorry to hear that. Time for a new one. I'm not sure mildew will come off, even with dry cleaning (petroleum based solvent).
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Deimos
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« Reply #1118 on: September 15, 2020, 03:49:27 am »

My duvet came back from storage damp Sad

Sorry to hear that. Time for a new one. I'm not sure mildew will come off, even with dry cleaning (petroleum based solvent).

Not just time for a new duvet....It's time to find a new storage facility.  Angry
You pay those places to protect and/or safeguard your property.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2020, 03:51:11 am by Deimos » Logged

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Caledonian
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« Reply #1119 on: September 15, 2020, 09:09:15 am »

My duvet came back from storage damp Sad

Sorry to hear that. Time for a new one. I'm not sure mildew will come off, even with dry cleaning (petroleum based solvent).

I think I will contact a dry cleaner first, see what they think is possible. It's an expensive duvet...

My duvet came back from storage damp Sad

Sorry to hear that. Time for a new one. I'm not sure mildew will come off, even with dry cleaning (petroleum based solvent).

Not just time for a new duvet....It's time to find a new storage facility.  Angry
You pay those places to protect and/or safeguard your property.
That too. I send them an email as well,I've paid them enough.....
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Cora Courcelle
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« Reply #1120 on: September 17, 2020, 11:52:36 am »

If there isn't mildew/fungus actually showing on it you might be able to spread it and let it dry naturally then spray it with disinfectant and let it dry again?

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LukeHogbin
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« Reply #1121 on: September 19, 2020, 08:21:49 am »


Whoever the (censored) who wrote the ESP-IDF Tools installer was, they deserve a high five to the face. With a brick. Repeatedly. Until they learn never again to write such useless (censored) error messages. Feels like they "learned" error handling from a random post on StackOverflow. GAH! Took me two hours to figure out WHICH of the components couldn't be downloaded!

GAHHHHHH!
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1122 on: September 19, 2020, 09:31:26 am »

Silly error messages: I had one on my work computer stating:

"The error message is too long to be displayed"

OK                    Cancel

WTF do I do with an error message for an error message?
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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #1123 on: September 19, 2020, 02:06:32 pm »

I have had an Oscar fish for 10 to 15 years, he's been looking a bit dikky for a few weeks now, medication not working, I decided this morning to stop the suffering in the most humane way I could, not a pleasant experience, but had to be done.

Now I have to re-stock the tank. Gaaaaagh!   £££££.........

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Deimos
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« Reply #1124 on: September 19, 2020, 11:09:24 pm »

I have had an Oscar fish for 10 to 15 years, he's been looking a bit dikky for a few weeks now, medication not working, I decided this morning to stop the suffering in the most humane way I could, not a pleasant experience, but had to be done.

Now I have to re-stock the tank. Gaaaaagh!   £££££.........

Not to be morbid  --and if it would really distress you to answer this you need not reply Cry--- but how do you humanely euthanize a fish?
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