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Author Topic: Vintage or Steampunk Packaging - images thereof.  (Read 3881 times)
RJBowman
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« Reply #25 on: May 29, 2016, 11:33:17 pm »

Any British store will have these tins, overseas or home.

What do you do with the syrup? I saw it listed in a recipe for ANZAC biscuits, but I'm an American and only chocolate chip cookies are up to my standards.
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« Reply #26 on: May 30, 2016, 08:44:56 am »

Any British store will have these tins, overseas or home.


What do you do with the syrup? I saw it listed in a recipe for ANZAC biscuits, but I'm an American and only chocolate chip cookies are up to my standards.


This statement makes absolutely no sense ----^

Let me see if I read this right... You're an American so only chocolate chips cookies are *up* to your standards? ANZAC Biscuits are not? Huh  Is there a type of Cookie or biscuit that goes with Veteran's Day or Memorial Day, which would satisfy you??  Roll Eyes

~By the way, Happy Memorial Day (today)~

So Oreos are beneath you and so are Tea biscuits and Butter Shortbread cookies too?

What are you, some sort of biscuit-nazi?  Cheesy

Seinfeld Clip - The Soup Nazi


Seinfeld - The End of the Soup Nazi



Comedy??  No, no no, no. Comedy based on REAL life!
Dateline NBC - The REAL Soup Nazi


You can buy the Soup Nazi's soups packaged at my local super (no joke).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Original_Soup_Man
« Last Edit: May 30, 2016, 09:13:31 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #27 on: May 30, 2016, 09:46:29 am »

Here's another Victorian Era tin:

A late 19th. C. tin of "La Suiza Chocolates, by Logidiani [sic] Bros.," a chocolatier and candy company founded in Mexico City by the Lodigliani brothers in 1896. The Lodigliani Bros. were migrants from the region of Turin in Italy.



« Last Edit: May 30, 2016, 09:51:54 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
morozow
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« Reply #28 on: May 30, 2016, 10:22:49 am »

Confectionery Abrikosov.

Candy jar (without lid)

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Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #29 on: June 05, 2016, 02:56:52 am »

That Yankee chap that made no sense earlier - he doesn't understand biscuits. He doesn't even know what they are...

To the Yank - Syrup is an ingredient in cooking, it is a product of refining sugar. Used to sweeten cakes and biscuits and make them moist.
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Banfili
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« Reply #30 on: June 05, 2016, 06:18:55 am »

RJ, golden syrup is a much refined version of treacle/molasses, produced as a by product of sugar refining, as is rum!

In Australia it was (and still is) known as "Cockies Joy".

A Cockie, as opposed to a cockatoo, which is a bird, was a derogatory name for a small acreage farmer, usually mixed grains and/or sheep, given to them by 'squatters', who usually had many thousands of acres and primarily reared cattle. Similar to your 'dirt' farmers and ranchers. Anybody who calls a farm or station (large acreage, owned by squatters) a 'ranch' is likely to be frowned upon, as is anyone who refers to 'rustlers'! The equivalent here is a 'poddy-dodger' for cattle/sheep thief or 'gully raker' for horse thief.

Golden syrup is bliss in a tin! Very often it was the only form of sweetener other than sugar available in large quantities. Breakfast may well have consisted of damper (unleavened loaf of bread) and golden syrup, with a tin mug of tea. Sugar was expensive, golden syrup was cheap.

Coming from a household with very little money, golden syrup on bread or toast (in the evening) was a mainstay.

And anyone who has not had a piping-hot golden sponge pudding, with hot custard and/or ice cream has missed bliss, and should feel deprived!!

Not to mention golden syrup dumplings!

ANZAC's are a crunchy (or soft, depending on the cook) round biscuit made, among other things, with corn flakes and golden syrup.

As for choc-chip, anyone who has access to Tim Tams ....!
« Last Edit: June 05, 2016, 06:23:15 am by Banfili » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #31 on: June 06, 2016, 11:01:26 am »

Piping-hot steamed golden sponge pudding, with hot custard is one of the best treats you can imagine...

There is a pudding club here that you can join. They go to posh restaurants and eat only puddings...
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RJBowman
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« Reply #32 on: June 07, 2016, 05:22:48 pm »

Piping-hot steamed golden sponge pudding, with hot custard is one of the best treats you can imagine...

There is a pudding club here that you can join. They go to posh restaurants and eat only puddings...

For the next several months I am mostly going to be a member of the steamed vegetables and lean white meat club; doctor's orders.
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Banfili
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« Reply #33 on: June 08, 2016, 04:41:02 am »

Nothing wrong with steamed veg & lean white meat, RJ - does your lean white meat include fish?
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RJBowman
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« Reply #34 on: June 08, 2016, 05:20:36 am »

Nothing wrong with steamed veg & lean white meat, RJ - does your lean white meat include fish?

It could; I'm trying to cut down on sugar, fat, cholesterol (in that order). I haven't cut out red meat completely, but it might be better for me if I did. I sometimes eat broiled fish when I dine out, but I don't have it much at home.
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Banfili
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« Reply #35 on: June 08, 2016, 02:32:07 pm »

Grilled (broiled) fish I usually eat out - stinks up the house too much otherwise. White fish (or fish in general) can be found as steam-in-the-bag jobbies, or you can make your own steam-in-the-bag with one of those dinky little vacuum sealers.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #36 on: June 08, 2016, 05:10:18 pm »

Piping-hot steamed golden sponge pudding, with hot custard is one of the best treats you can imagine...

There is a pudding club here that you can join. They go to posh restaurants and eat only puddings...

In other circles the "Pudding Club"  is  a club only some can join and not all members have volunteered to join . { it can be a euphemism  for "expecting ? }
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #37 on: June 08, 2016, 05:24:12 pm »

It is definitely not THAT pudding club.

http://www.threewayshousehotel.com/pudding_club/

The site is referred to here.

Take care when visiting the actual pudding club website, turn down your speaker first and avoid the areas to the left and right of the main page - you'll see what I mean.
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #38 on: June 12, 2016, 09:55:33 am »

Treacle is great on porridge.  Grin
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Banfili
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« Reply #39 on: June 12, 2016, 04:26:26 pm »

So is Golden Syrup, and honey!
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RJBowman
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« Reply #40 on: June 13, 2016, 03:10:12 pm »

A little glass bottle that I found at a garage sale last month:


This isn't my photo; I found this through image search. My bottle looks a little darker than this one, but that could just be the lighting or image brightness.

The bottle is about three inches tall. The raised print on the bottle says "Cathedral Brand--Celebrated Remedy--Chief Wahoo Electric Tonic--Walbridgeco Dunsmuir Cal".

The bottle looked to me like it was new rather than vintage; I thought that I had seen similar bottles in dollar stores circa 2000. So I did a search for Chief Wahoo Electric Tonic. It turns out that there never was such a product, and the bottles were a novelty item sold in gift shops at tourist attractions in the 1970's.

So it is a nostalgic tribute to a 19th century technology that never was. Which seems very steampunk to me, and shows that the steampunk aesthetic had a presence in our culture a good decade or so before the word was coined.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #41 on: June 13, 2016, 03:27:39 pm »

That's lovely!
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von Corax
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« Reply #42 on: June 13, 2016, 10:34:05 pm »

The overlapping top would be ideal, but the little round lid that you press into place would be acceptable.

This may not be exactly what you're after, but David's Tea sell overlapping-lid tea tins. (They also sell tea, of course!)
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RJBowman
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« Reply #43 on: June 13, 2016, 11:16:22 pm »

The overlapping top would be ideal, but the little round lid that you press into place would be acceptable.

This may not be exactly what you're after, but David's Tea sell overlapping-lid tea tins. (They also sell tea, of course!)



That is very much like the kind off vintage tin that I had in mind. You could cover their embossed name with a nice laser-printed label and make your steampunk package.
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steiconi
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« Reply #44 on: June 14, 2016, 06:58:33 pm »

Thanks for the picture.  I read an old book ("Pink Furniture") when I was a kid; it made reference to breaking a soda bottle to get the marble, and it totally mystified me.
Note: In the book, they put the marble in the tea kettle to prevent mineral build-up.  I would think that would still work today.

Don't forget Codd-neck soda bottles (AKA "Marble Soda" bottles), where a glass marble trapped in a specially shaped bottle keeps the soda under pressure.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #45 on: June 15, 2016, 12:41:11 am »

We still put stones/marbles in kettles to stop the mineral build up.

Also with regard to tins with push on over-lapping lids, type the following into ebay.co.uk
"vintage bisto tin"
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Sir Farthington-Smythe
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« Reply #46 on: June 15, 2016, 01:11:57 am »

Does anyone know where I can get old style tin with a circular metal lid? The type they use to use for cocoa and baking powder before they switched to plastic in the 80's.

I know Walkers (The Shortbread, not the Crisps) puts out this type of tin.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #47 on: June 21, 2016, 11:11:49 am »

That Walkers postbox tin might look old-fashioned to you and steampunkish - but to me, those are postboxes are on my street. They are every day street furniture items.

A Jacobs Cream Cracker tin from my kitchen.



A reproduction Bisto gravy granules tin. Once again, from my larder.

« Last Edit: June 21, 2016, 11:15:16 am by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #48 on: June 23, 2016, 09:17:34 am »



That is very much like the kind off vintage tin that I had in mind. You could cover their embossed name with a nice laser-printed label and make your steampunk package.


Those lids have the beneficial effect of forcing some air out and sealing them and another reason for the overhanging lip is so that they could be sealed permanently by soldering them shut. That is how the original cans were sealed.
This is a good resource for Victorian canning (actually interesting): http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21689069
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Sir Farthington-Smythe
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« Reply #49 on: June 23, 2016, 03:03:18 pm »

That Walkers postbox tin might look old-fashioned to you and steampunkish - but to me, those are postboxes are on my street. They are every day street furniture items.
Sorry, that was simply the only picture of a Walkers round tin I could locate.  It does not look old-fashioned to me in the least.  My creative mind was suggesting it as a canvas for a project to make one's own vintage-style tin.  My logical mind had no play in it, and is innocent of any wrongdoing; my creative mind takes full responsibility for its actions.   Wink
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