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Author Topic: Steampunk Katana Umbrella?  (Read 4139 times)
SolarCenturion
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Stand a little less between me and the sun


« Reply #25 on: September 30, 2018, 01:11:50 am »

Just a note on the commercially available "katana" umbrellas. I've had one for years, obtained at the Spy Museum where I worked. It's remarkably sturdy, even more so than my "lightsaber" umbrella. It's protected me from driving rain and stood up, unruffled, to hurricane winds. I live in the DC metro area which tends to be very very tense about the carry of weapons. I have had exactly zero trouble or unwanted attention from law enforcement.
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"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because
rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - George Orwell
J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #26 on: September 30, 2018, 04:24:05 am »

I thought that this was going to be a discussion of swords disguised as umbrellas, as might be wielded by the Penguin.

An umbrella in a katana sheath? It would be interesting to change the handle of the umbrella to resemble a sword's handle and hilt. It could be a quite marketable novelty item.

Well, the whole idea came from people telling my that my umbrella tied to the back of my backpack looked like a Katana (the foam handle is cylindrical). I then found the cardboard cylinders and I've tested it for months with that steel bracket. Worked really well but cardboard has its issues. Most notably I wanted a perfectly smooth surface.

We duscussed last page how to adapt actual Katana parts to replace the foam handle, but to be honest if you only wrap the ribbon around the foam handle and you adapt a hilt of sorts, you already have a passable facsimile.

My idea was to laquer the scabbard to a glossy shine with some patterns on it.

Just a note on the commercially available "katana" umbrellas. I've had one for years, obtained at the Spy Museum where I worked. It's remarkably sturdy, even more so than my "lightsaber" umbrella. It's protected me from driving rain and stood up, unruffled, to hurricane winds. I live in the DC metro area which tends to be very very tense about the carry of weapons. I have had exactly zero trouble or unwanted attention from law enforcement.

It's good to know. I have a chance to get those kinds of things at festivals in Austin (eg SXSW I'm March)

Right now I just stumbled on this idea to reproduce cobalt blue on white ceramic. If nothing else, as an exploration and perhaps to make something I could sell online. It's not inconceivable for it to be Japanese as the technique was also brought to Japan (in the previous page I explain with examples which countries have this originally Persian technique, namely China, Spain, Mexico, Holland and Japan - and France (Limoges? Which I didn't talk about). I only need about $300 extra permonth to pay for my school loans and it's doable to come up with something easy to make

Mexican Talavera pottery




« Last Edit: September 30, 2018, 04:35:33 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #27 on: October 01, 2018, 04:39:24 pm »



As a 15/16yr I used to carry an umbrella over winter  for unexpected down pours. Due to  the extreme weather conditions enjoyed in NZ,  broken umbrellas are to be found  on road sides, buses and other public places. For practical purposes, I chose a large black man's umbrella.  It had coverage  and was  resistant to the wind. Being a short petitely built lass, I did experience the occasional very real  fear of  achieving lift off.

 I found there was a n art to carrying a large umbrella, to avoid knocking over or stabbing myself,  other  pedestrians and passengers  and being lifted off the ground by sudden gusts. 

Pointing the open umbrella into the wind created a pressure  that prevented it flying away, lifting up or twistingbaround.  When closed, to avoid taking out an eye of  unsuspecting passer by  or catching myself on poles  and other obstacles, I held it  pointed down under my arm, like a  soldier's rifle. I came in handy as a weapon in several moments of threat  from unwanted attention from young male passengers and older male drivers in the road side.

 
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #28 on: October 01, 2018, 05:59:17 pm »

Another idea floating about in my head is to have someone print those ceramic plate patterns on the umbrella's canopy (fabric) itself. That'd make a pretty nice gift. Since those umbrellas are so cheap ($6), I will probably include them with the scabbard.

I will need to figure out how to paint the scabbard in other colours. A spray adhesion promoter /primer does exist for plastic. I could try and paint one segment of pipe but I fear the paint will be prone to scratching. Nowhere close as impervious to scratches as the blue PVC glue I used.

~ ~ ~ ~


As a 15/16yr I used to carry an umbrella over winter  for unexpected down pours. Due to  the extreme weather conditions enjoyed in NZ,  broken umbrellas are to be found  on road sides, buses and other public places. For practical purposes, I chose a large black man's umbrella.  It had coverage  and was  resistant to the wind. Being a short petitely built lass, I did experience the occasional very real  fear of  achieving lift off.

 I found there was a n art to carrying a large umbrella, to avoid knocking over or stabbing myself,  other  pedestrians and passengers  and being lifted off the ground by sudden gusts. 

Pointing the open umbrella into the wind created a pressure  that prevented it flying away, lifting up or twistingbaround.  When closed, to avoid taking out an eye of  unsuspecting passer by  or catching myself on poles  and other obstacles, I held it  pointed down under my arm, like a  soldier's rifle. I came in handy as a weapon in several moments of threat  from unwanted attention from young male passengers and older male drivers in the road side.

 

Indeed. There's a technique to carrying an umbrella. Worse with a backback when you have to run to catch a bus. To stabilise the backpack you pull the straps like grabbing the lapels of a waistcoat. Since you have no hands left to carry the umbrella, you have to use the thumbs to hold the  backpack straps, and the rest of the fingers to carry the umbrella horizontally. This prevents you from stabbing yourself with the umbrella if you fall. But it's still dangerous because you can catch poles or people, like you say.

That's why I came up with a way to carry it on my back, like a sword by tying the velcro strap to the backback. But that damages the umbrella's fabric (and you still will inevitably catch the umbrella in a closing bus door, for example, or a space between a seat and the inner wall of the bus, thus bending or breaking the umbrella.

The scabbard saves you from all that.

~ ~ ~ ~
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #29 on: October 01, 2018, 10:40:12 pm »



 Mr Wilhelm, the scabbard is an excellent adaption. One I only wish I had  in my teens.  It would have had the added benefit of looking fabulously impressive as I pulled it out with a flourish and bandied  at my hapless assailents

 Oh it would have been so good!
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Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #30 on: October 05, 2018, 06:22:54 pm »

I've always quite fancied the idea of the 'umbrella as offensive weapon' (particularly useful for tripping or stabbing those who have pushed in front of me etc); what is so nice about the scabbard is that you can still jab without risking damage to your precious brolly.  Well done Mr Wilhelm!
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You have to tread a fine line between avant-garde surrealism and getting yourself sectioned...
J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #31 on: October 05, 2018, 11:39:26 pm »

I've always quite fancied the idea of the 'umbrella as offensive weapon' (particularly useful for tripping or stabbing those who have pushed in front of me etc); what is so nice about the scabbard is that you can still jab without risking damage to your precious brolly.  Well done Mr Wilhelm!

Thank you Ms. Courcelle. Field tests show the scabbard performs as advertised. The pipe is quite rigid. Not too heavy and the metal pipe holder is strong and holding fast with epoxy. The blue PVC glue is fused to the PVC pipe and has hardened (the glue is a liquid PVC slurry itself). The decorative pattern is raised as thick as 1 mm above the surface in some places, so it's very resistant to scratches.

This weekend I'll try to make a second one, hopefully with a better, more organised decorative pattern. I only have bright orange as an alternative colour, though. I don't know if there is an equivalent thin walled pipe in dark grey (electrical conduit). Otherwise I'll have to explore paints.

I have a added a pipe cap (stopper) with a small hole to weep out any water, because the pipe is so smooth inside the umbrella tends to slowly creep out of the pipe.

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