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Author Topic: Interbellum / Interwar era : Design and lifestyle etc  (Read 3716 times)
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« on: January 20, 2016, 06:56:43 am »


 The Interwar years a.k.a. the Interbellum, 1919 - 1939.  The  intervening years between  World War One  and World War Two.

 How familiar is one with this period and is there any relevant and topical  books or websites on the subject that are   of a non military  focus.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interwar_period
https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interbellum

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/GenteelInterbellumSetting
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2016, 07:39:47 am »







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Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2016, 09:07:31 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
There's always that splendid series, Agatha Christie's Hercules Poirot. Apart from the delight of watching David Suchet in the role, the sets and costuming are beautifully done.

For your reading list, I'd recommend Somerset Maugham.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
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Inflatable Friend
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Italy Italy



« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2016, 10:23:48 am »

Ah, the faded glory of the interwar years!

The Jeeves stories by P. G. Wodehouse, or the Jeeves and Wooster TV show with Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry.

The Victoria and Albert Museum has a rather nifty reading guide to Art Deco - Located here

The Great Gatsby (film or book) would also be handy on any viewing/reading list.

Of course, the interwar period wasn't just all curvy deco, we've got the birth of many styles, the large majority of which were concerned with either the horror of WW1 or the swooshiness of new technology.
De Stijl / Neoplasticism pops up in the Netherlands, Modernism arrives and just won't go away (Blame Van der Rohe, Le Corbusier, and Frank Lloyd Wright), they're following on from the Futurists who made it out of WW1 intact.

There's also Dada, which leads into Surrealism, theBauhaus school emerges in Germany as a successor to the Arts and Crafts Movement and in Russia there's the arrival of Constructivism, tangentilly this links to Cosmism, which really shouldn't be confused with Cosmicism.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2016, 10:15:14 pm »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
There's always that splendid series, Agatha Christie's Hercules Poirot. Apart from the delight of watching David Suchet in the role, the sets and costuming are beautifully done.

For your reading list, I'd recommend Somerset Maugham.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily

 Yes !  Agatha Christie . Peter Ustinov also did a good turn in the Poirot  role . 

There was  some wonderful authors of that era . I remember childrens books passed down to my older siblings that made their mark on me . Biggles, Just William,  Ginger Megs, My Friend Flicker,  ...  Illustrations from then were  fairly evocative of the times.

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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2016, 10:32:57 pm »

Ah, the faded glory of the interwar years!

The Jeeves stories by P. G. Wodehouse, or the Jeeves and Wooster TV show with Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry.

The Victoria and Albert Museum has a rather nifty reading guide to Art Deco - Located here

The Great Gatsby (film or book) would also be handy on any viewing/reading list.

Of course, the interwar period wasn't just all curvy deco, we've got the birth of many styles, the large majority of which were concerned with either the horror of WW1 or the swooshiness of new technology.
De Stijl / Neoplasticism pops up in the Netherlands, Modernism arrives and just won't go away (Blame Van der Rohe, Le Corbusier, and Frank Lloyd Wright), they're following on from the Futurists who made it out of WW1 intact.

There's also Dada, which leads into Surrealism, theBauhaus school emerges in Germany as a successor to the Arts and Crafts Movement and in Russia there's the arrival of Constructivism, tangentilly this links to Cosmism, which really shouldn't be confused with Cosmicism.


 Thanks for those  hunting hints. There was more than Art Deco  & Art Nouveau going on  through those years.  The military and  industrial influence and experience was strong in that era.
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Hez
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Canada Canada


aka Miss Primrose C Leigh


« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2016, 03:41:04 am »

Do you remember the BBC show "House of Elliot" about two sisters in ~1920 who open a fashion house.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2016, 05:26:13 pm »

Do you remember the BBC show "House of Elliot" about two sisters in ~1920 who open a fashion house.

 Yes , that rings a bell. The  story lines around married men  must have stuck n my mind.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_Eliott
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2016, 06:14:50 pm »


Just William. The boy who terrorised and English village for  50 years.[  these books  would now be deemed offensive for the racial and misogynistic  slurs ]

 http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51jLz1Sij4L._AC_UL320_SR226,320_.jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Just_William_(book_series)



 For  a jolly good listen to  proscribed BBC English
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmEcUabNmYQ
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Atterton
Time Traveler
****

Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2016, 11:09:05 pm »

I like the website called The Fedora Lounge. It's a board for aficinados of the 30s and 40s.
As a new zealander, I assume you are aware of the town called Napier and it's architecture.
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Resurrectionist and freelance surgeon.
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2016, 11:11:39 am »

I like the website called The Fedora Lounge. It's a board for aficinados of the 30s and 40s.
As a new zealander, I assume you are aware of the town called Napier and it's architecture.


 Thank you for sharing the site.

  I have never been to Napier, one day I will. My dad used to visit there a lot.  He loved it there.  It was rebuilt after a major mega thrust earthquake in  1931. The books make it look lovely there with all the Deco  buildings .

 Have you been there ?



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Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2016, 07:15:00 pm »

I have a love of the Art Deco travel posters of that era. Also, although I know the airship is the preferred mode of aerial transport around here, I have a  particular soft spot for flying boats. So put the twp together... https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=1930s+travel+posters+flying+boat&hl=en-GB&gbv=2&prmd=ivns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjk_ai6gb7KAhUCJhoKHXJvA30QsAQIFA.

Yours,
Miranda.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2016, 07:55:05 am »

I have a love of the Art Deco travel posters of that era. Also, although I know the airship is the preferred mode of aerial transport around here, I have a  particular soft spot for flying boats. So put the twp together... https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=1930s+travel+posters+flying+boat&hl=en-GB&gbv=2&prmd=ivns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjk_ai6gb7KAhUCJhoKHXJvA30QsAQIFA.

Yours,
Miranda.


 Miss Miranda
 You fairly made my day with that link . I too have a secret penchant for  flying boats and    vintage travel posters of that era.

 I have had the good fortune to travel on a flying boat some years  ago.  It was a  marvelous landing !   

One day I shall do it again !

 New Zealand  was at the fore front of air travel  in the early days of aviation, because it was so far away . Air ship moorings  were planned  for here  after the WW1,  events  meant that   development was  stopped.
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Atterton
Time Traveler
****

Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2016, 03:17:01 pm »

I have a 1930s travel poster with an airship, hanging over my bed. I bought it at the Zeppelin museum in Friedrichshafen.
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Fairley B. Strange
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Australia Australia


Relax, I've done much dumber things and survived..


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« Reply #14 on: January 24, 2016, 08:34:32 pm »

And of course there are the airship liners.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=1930s+travel+posters+flying+boat&hl=en-GB&gbv=2&prmd=ivns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjk_ai6gb7KAhUCJhoKHXJvA30QsAQIFA#hl=en-GB&tbm=isch&q=1930s+travel+posters+airship
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Choose a code to live by, die by it if you have to.
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #15 on: January 25, 2016, 10:34:10 am »



 Zeppelin, dirigible, airship  ... the  sound of the words as they trip off the tongue , the curving shape  and contours , the  intriguing history lend these craft a certain romance that makes it  difficult to remember they were real   and may well be a regular feature in our future skies.


 They are just beautiful




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chironex
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


The typing jellyfish monster


« Reply #16 on: March 03, 2016, 08:20:49 am »

Miss Fishers Muder Mysteries (who says crime doesn't play?)
(also, the original books by Kerry Greenwood. Which turn out differently, therefore if you've read them the series will, reportedtly, not make much sense.)

Aviation was such a big element in the culture of the world then, it would be worth looking up those pioneering flyers, Bert Hinkler, Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith and so many others, some of whom had purchased Kingsford-Smiths redundant aircraft! Especially look up the "Coffee-Royal Affair".

As for architecture, in much of the world there were still Gothic revivals being built, Some even new, although many were simply such large projects that some were started in the 1910s and still in progress until the 1990s. Mission Revival went until the mid-1930s in the New World, as was Mayan Revival, and after WW! the Clifornia Bungalow style spread from the US to Australia, where it was adapted into the Ashgrovian style Queenslander, then to the rest of the world. Functionalism continued until the 1930s, as did Bauhaus, and Streamline Moderne was in style in the early '30s.

Of course, the culture of the era was not evenly distributed all over the world; some imports were impractical, such as Hollywood-style houses in northern Australia which had the pool deck developed over; while the world had moved on from the anachronistic Model T, half the worlds motorists were still driving them, and had to contend with the same dirt track roads, which they had to share with horses and oxen, as you would see in a Wild West cowtown; and while railways across the word adopted streamliners such as the Flying Hamburger, A4, Princess Coronation and the Hiawathas, Australia, despite the Spirit of Progress, still had the old Ghan, Forty-two Up and the Aramac-Barcaldine. Which, when the track was actually usable, still drove at a snails pace...
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #17 on: March 03, 2016, 08:53:21 am »


New Zealand and Australia were at the fore front of aviation  due to the long distance from the Northern Hemisphere and their  isolated locations.  There  are amazing travel posters and photos from back in the day ; along with  some very interesting books on the history of flight in the Antipodes.

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morozow
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Russian Federation Russian Federation



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« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2016, 09:29:30 am »

Maybe someone will be interested, a selection of Soviet posters and paintings of the 20's 30-ies.



http://photochronograph.ru/2013/05/18/plakaty-20-x-30-x-godov/#more-9034

http://monk.com.ua/interesting_and_incredibly/2013/06/26/podborka-plakatov-20-h---30-h-godov.html
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Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?
SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
***
England England



« Reply #19 on: March 03, 2016, 10:17:47 am »

I'm liking this one..........



Kinda reminds me of David Uhl in a way.

http://ostariz.blogspot.co.uk/2014/06/david-uhl.html
« Last Edit: March 03, 2016, 10:26:44 am by SeVeNeVeS » Logged

Crescat Scientia
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Fabricator and temporally confused.


« Reply #20 on: March 04, 2016, 12:58:08 am »

Ah yes, the first historical timeperiod I fell in love with.  I have many books and artifacts from and about those years.
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chironex
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


The typing jellyfish monster


« Reply #21 on: March 04, 2016, 12:02:04 pm »


New Zealand and Australia were at the fore front of aviation  due to the long distance from the Northern Hemisphere and their  isolated locations.  There  are amazing travel posters and photos from back in the day ; along with  some very interesting books on the history of flight in the Antipodes.




Check out the second part of this 1936 newsreel footage, showing an alleged recruitment centre for flight attendants in 1936 (there is a lot fishy about this) once they began to allow women to be flight attendants. In fact, the site itself is full of old newsreel footage from the era.
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J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #22 on: March 04, 2016, 12:31:10 pm »



Well, not really my favourite style, or political inclination.  But here is one painted by Diego Rivera to match those other paintings...

Mexico City. Palacio de Bellas Artes: Mural "El Hombre en la encrucijada" ( 1934 ) by Diego Rivera

Aztec production of gold

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diego_Rivera

And who can forget his wife, Frida Kahlo?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frida_Kahlo


« Last Edit: March 04, 2016, 12:45:38 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #23 on: March 04, 2016, 12:32:11 pm »

I'm liking this one..........



Kinda reminds me of David Uhl in a way.

http://ostariz.blogspot.co.uk/2014/06/david-uhl.html


There is something  striking about that one.  There is eye catching  soviet propaganda art from that era
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #24 on: March 04, 2016, 12:33:29 pm »



Well, not really my favourite style.  But here is one painted by Diego Rivera to match those other paintings...
Mexico City. Palacio de Bellas Artes: Mural "El Hombre en la encrucijada" ( 1934 ) by Diego Rivera


That is quite a piece
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