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Author Topic: The fibrephile's lament....  (Read 1358 times)
Miss Indigo Darling
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« on: January 06, 2016, 10:13:21 pm »

 Hello, my friends,

 I have a question. I've been perusing some of the online Steampunk fashion blogs, also looking at fashion show photos from events, vendors, etc. I see many lovely and carefully crafted garments, some incredible looks, and a lot of creativty. What I do not see, (in every single place I've looked as of late,) are knitted items. Huh

 No lace shawls. No boleros, spencers, or shrugs. No spats, no hats, no cuffs, no gloves, no fichu.(Gezhundheit.)

 I see gorgeous evening corsets paired with awe inspiring skirts, that are simply shrieking for an intricate lace shawl, but there are none to be seen. Nattily attired folk, but not a single jabot in sight. Gritty adventurers  and Airship captains with nary a fingerless glove.  Woe.

 Can anyone tell me why this might be? Is it that no one is knitting these things for sale?  Is it that wool has a bad reputation?  It's no longer the itchy, horrid stuff that would be best suited to scrub pots with.   There is so much beautiful, soft wool out there, as well as the gorgeous blends of silk and alpaca which are spun into gossamer lace yarns, cotton, and many other non-allergenic fibres for the wool challenged among us.  Why, oh why does there seem to be such a dearth of knitwear on the Steampunk scene?  Help! Help!
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"Of all the fishes in the sea, my favourite is the bass. He climbs up on the tall sea weed, and slides down on his hands and knees."
Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
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Rogue Ætherlord
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09madasafish
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2016, 10:38:18 pm »

Oh there's knitted items out there in the SP community, for example there is/was a lady here in the UK who attended The Asylum and W(hitby)G(oth)W(eekend) who sold knitted steampunk items, and the patterns to make them (the ones that stick out in my mind were fascinators and knitted goggles for the steampunk pet). Not to mention the fact that a friend of mine was (once upon a time) attempting to crochet herself a kraken.

If I personally had to guess as to a reason why knitted items are rarely seen, I'd say it's probably because so few people these days know how to knit,and since those that do know are increasingly among the older generation (and therefore vulnerable to the consequences of advanced age, although my own mother does swear to the therapeutic effect knitting has on her arthritis), there's probably a certain amount of reluctance on the part of us youngsters who don't know how to knit to request items from those who can, I mean can you imagine the conversation you'd be likely to have with your mother/granny if you asked her crochet a kraken for you?
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Miss Indigo Darling
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« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2016, 10:57:57 pm »

Thank you for your reply. I can indeed imagine the interesting conversation which would ensue if I were to have asked my granny to knit for me a kraken- The first question she would have had, I daresay, would have been; "A kraken? As in the kraken?"(My granny was very well read.)  And upon hearing the answer, the next would have been; "And why ever would you want it around your neck?"

I am, however, one of the the "new era" knitters. We're absolutely mad for it, and there's an entire subculture of younger knitters going at it hammer and tongs ( Or should I say needles and wool?)  I even have a pattern for a neck kraken, it's absolutely adorable! I have been knitting intricate lace shawls, and some of the other items which I mentioned in my first post. At one time I had been considering the possibility of purveying such items, for reasonable prices. But there's a lot that goes into it, and I didn't want to leap onto the platform of that train if it's either left the station already, or the route has been discontinued.  Being such a fan of fine knitwear, it saddens me to see so little of it out there.

I must say, you would look quite good in a stylish jabot.
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LadyAsprin
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« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2016, 11:22:33 pm »

Lots of people knit but only for themselves.  I knit and sew but only for myself, there are a lot of knitters in the steampunk group on ravelry - http://www.ravelry.com/groups/steamy-stitches - although no posts recently.

I wear shawls at Lincoln and often have my knitting in my bag when at the Asylum but I kinda prefer that fact most of the knitwear is knitted by the wearer as it makes it more personal.

A SteamBear in a knitted outfit.

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Miss Indigo Darling
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« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2016, 11:31:24 pm »

Hello fellow knitter!
I'm in that group, there's not a lot of recent posting in there, but when I finish a steamy project I try to make sure that I link it to the group from my projects page.
(Your bear is very cute!)
I'd be so happy to be able to knit things for the  fashionably inclined Steampunks who find themselves knit-less because, for reasons of their own, they have chosen not to go the DIY knitted route. I have so much stuff I've made for myself, and want to share the love.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2016, 12:11:12 am by Miss Indigo Darling » Logged
MWBailey
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rtafStElmo
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2016, 03:06:10 am »

I do naalbinding, but mainly to darn socks, etc.; it's great for shoring up worn support and diabetic socks, and I've even darned a pair of pants or two that have had altercations with barbed wire or thorns. I have yet to complete a pair of socks or a cap, however.
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Miss Indigo Darling
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« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2016, 04:08:10 am »

I've heard of naalbinding,  I think it might be one of the earliest forms of fabric creation, if my understanding is correct. From the photos I've seen it looks very sturdy and durable, yet not overly bulky. You're the only person I've yet encountered who knows how to do it!
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Banfili
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« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2016, 04:40:07 pm »

As an uncoordinated lefty, any knitting attempts I have made in the past look like very bad macrame dragged through a hedge, backwards! (I do, however, embroider and occasionally make a tapestry or two. I have a rug in a box waiting for the right occasion to be made - winter by the fire springs to mind).

Ditto for crochet. Sigh! Grin
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LadyAsprin
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« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2016, 02:18:07 am »

As an uncoordinated lefty, any knitting attempts I have made in the past look like very bad macrame dragged through a hedge, backwards! (I do, however, embroider and occasionally make a tapestry or two. I have a rug in a box waiting for the right occasion to be made - winter by the fire springs to mind).

Ditto for crochet. Sigh! Grin
Im a Leftie-'English' knitter and I find this site very useful.

http://www.yarncraftsforlefties.com/ - It has videos for both English and Continental styles and can be watched over and over again.
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Cora Courcelle
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« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2016, 10:21:13 pm »

I learnt to crochet left-handed by putting a mirror next to the picture instructions so they were reversed; I can knit but so slowly that it's painful to watch. (I knitted a pair of baby bootees once and by the time I'd finished the child was toddling!)
I like embroidery best.
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Banfili
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« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2016, 01:52:16 pm »

Whilst accepting a necessity for the acquisition of some ladylike accomplishments, lest, perish the thought, one be thought unladylike, I do feel that embroidery, tapestry and the odd venture into making the occasional rug are perfectly adequate.

I would rather perform one or two such accomplishments with a certain measure of excellence, judged on the finished product, of course, than continue to attempt those known to induce a fit of unladylike language and result in the offending 'object' being cast into the fire!! I leave them to those gifted in those areas.
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Maudlin Hart
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« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2016, 03:17:26 pm »

Has anybody had a chance to try some of the patterns in Needles and Artifice? I might have to make the "Abundance" vest...
http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/sources/needles-and-artifice/patterns
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Ragamuffin
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Fabricator and temporally confused.


« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2016, 08:46:05 pm »

There is an odd dearth of knitted garments in steampunk given the very large number of knitting and crocheting patterns in Victorian ladies' magazines.

Personally I should like to see more fingerless mitts with suitable motifs.
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frances
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« Reply #13 on: February 27, 2016, 09:18:08 pm »

I wish someone was doing coloured fingerless gloves.  The only ones I could see at a recent event were those nylon stretchy ones.
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Banfili
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Australia Australia



« Reply #14 on: February 27, 2016, 11:24:12 pm »

I have a bright green pair, and a pair of sort-of fawn coloured ones with chocolate-coloured snowflakes, of fingerless gloves. Must locate them for the winter, although with the weather we are having at present, sinter seems an awfully long way off!
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