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Author Topic: Assistance in finding or making parts of my costume.  (Read 1824 times)
V-Fib
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« on: November 27, 2015, 10:45:16 pm »

Hey all!  So, I'm planning out my next outfit for Teslacon next year, and my girlfriend came up with the brilliant idea for me to go as a firefighter (my actual job).  So, I've been doing some research both online and at my station (looking at all of the antique equipment), and I've got an idea of all the things I need for my costume.  However, fashion isn't my strong suit (at all), and I'm still rather new at Steampunk.  I've found pictures of what I plan on doing for a costume, and I'm wondering if anyone can give me any tips in finding or making the parts of the costume.  Here are a few reference pictures.

http://www.phfire.com/files/news/4/1800s.jpg
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/62/49/f6/6249f6a25bc376b20b9f261ddb7be582.jpg
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a1/The_American_Fireman_by_Louis_Maurer_1858.jpg
http://imageweb-cdn.magnoliasoft.net/bridgeman/fullsize/pnp386810.jpg

They are, as follows:

Helmet - This part is rather simple.  I know where to buy actual leather helmets that were used in the 1800's, but they run a few hundred dollars and I'd be afraid of damaging them.  I'm looking for replicas that are hopefully cheaper.

Shirt - I'm not sure what to call the double-button shirt that I'd wear, but I know there is a name for it.

Coat - If possible, I'd love for it to be made of wool and have a rubber exterior (I'm a stickler for trying to make things as historically accurate as possible) 

Pants - I think I might just utilize tan dress pants.

Boots - All of the pictures I've seen of firefighters from this era have the boots at or just below the knees (not the full three-quarter boots used in the 1900's or the 14" boots we use today).  Preferably made of rubber. 

I've done my best to search for these articles of clothing, but alas, I've yet to turn up good sources.  I'd appreciate any help that you guys can provide.
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Stella Gaslight
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« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2015, 01:18:37 am »

how big is your head?  I have a fairly small one and can wear children's hats so I can get a foam fireman's hat fairly simply and make it look like leather.  I have been going to teslacon since the first one and I will say it gets hot sometimes and the lighter the hat the better.
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Crescat Scientia
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« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2015, 02:02:53 am »

That kind of button arrangement on a shirt or jacket is called "double breasted."

The cheapest double breasted shirts I have seen are chef's jackets sold to the restaurant trade.  You can get one for about $17.  Long-sleeved red ones are a little rarer than black or white ones.
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Drew P
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« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2015, 03:17:39 pm »

It's a good thing Teslacon is in November.
You would need to go outside a few times to releave yourself from the heat of being encased in wool/rubber/etc.
 Wink
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montysaurus
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« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2015, 03:42:50 pm »

To me, the Shirt in the picture looks more like a Bib Front Shirt. Like this http://www.riverjunction.com/Shirt--Frontier-Bib-Front-Shirt--Six-Button--Cotton--Heritage-Brand_p_37.html. These are available at Western Wear Stores and on line.
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Crescat Scientia
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« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2015, 03:55:24 pm »

To me, the Shirt in the picture looks more like a Bib Front Shirt. Like this http://www.riverjunction.com/Shirt--Frontier-Bib-Front-Shirt--Six-Button--Cotton--Heritage-Brand_p_37.html. These are available at Western Wear Stores and on line.



That's as may be, but thanks to the restaurant trade you can get double-breasted chef's jackets very inexpensively.  Their fabric is generally lightweight for the hot kitchen environment, so they really are more like shirts than jackets.
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montysaurus
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« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2015, 03:59:55 pm »

http://www.hamiltondrygoods.com/clothing/bib-front-cowboy-shirt/ Here is another example. The Bibs came in different shapes. You could get a Shield Shape one and put the Hose company Logo or number on it. Like this: https://www.google.com/search?q=Antique+Firefighter+uniforms&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjjgqfQsLPJAhXGWj4KHbtlCnAQ_AUICSgD&biw=1366&bih=643#imgrc=dmEMoHqnuFm5PM%3A
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montysaurus
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« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2015, 06:42:43 pm »

You can also easily make a Bib front shirt from an existing shirt by getting more fabric and creating a bib. Add button holes. sew Buttons on shirt .
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Crescat Scientia
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« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2015, 07:21:27 pm »

You can also easily make a Bib front shirt from an existing shirt by getting more fabric and creating a bib. Add button holes. sew Buttons on shirt .

It's a great way to do it if you have the sewing skills and some reasonably matching fabric.
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Kensington Locke
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« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2015, 10:56:35 pm »

the rubber coated coat seems like that would get extra hot.  Is that really what a fireman would wear?   Wouldn't it melt?  I would have expected some slick/treated leather.

the boots look sort of like farmer's rubber boots.  Wrong material, but I wonder if that might be a viable alternative or clue to another source.

If you can only source white chef's shirts, consider dyeing it red to solve the problem...

Neat idea for an outfit.
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Major Wolfram Quicksilver
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« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2015, 11:23:19 pm »

Why go for a leather fireman's helmet?  You can get modern replicas of the brass ones for a fraction of the cost, just check ebay for example.  They're made in India, and look pretty good at a glance.
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« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2015, 11:56:32 pm »

Why go for a leather fireman's helmet?  You can get modern replicas of the brass ones for a fraction of the cost, just check ebay for example.  They're made in India, and look pretty good at a glance.

Leather would be a lot more comfortable, I would think.
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« Reply #12 on: December 04, 2015, 05:03:33 am »

Volcanized rubber (most likely the kind use due to availability) is able to withstand very high heats, more so than leather. Also, the fire's heat plus the hose's water can cause the leather to shrink and harden, like armor, making something so necessary for protection and movement not the ideal medium for this.
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Kensington Locke
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« Reply #13 on: December 04, 2015, 05:14:47 pm »

Volcanized rubber (most likely the kind use due to availability) is able to withstand very high heats, more so than leather. Also, the fire's heat plus the hose's water can cause the leather to shrink and harden, like armor, making something so necessary for protection and movement not the ideal medium for this.

Good info.  I've learned something new.

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Cmdr. Storm
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« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2015, 11:01:36 pm »

The Jacket is called a Turnout Coat, You may want to Check with Uniform Supply Shops/Stores to see if they have Any. My Dad used to be a Fire Fighter, so i know some of that Stuff. You may also want to check with a Leather Good Store maybe able to help you something Similar. Hope this Helps.
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V-Fib
Swab

United States United States



« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2015, 05:03:01 am »

the rubber coated coat seems like that would get extra hot.  Is that really what a fireman would wear?   Wouldn't it melt?  I would have expected some slick/treated leather.

the boots look sort of like farmer's rubber boots.  Wrong material, but I wonder if that might be a viable alternative or clue to another source.

If you can only source white chef's shirts, consider dyeing it red to solve the problem...

Neat idea for an outfit.

Rubber coats were worn to keep firefighters warm in the winter months, and also allow for water to run off of the uniform. 

As for using leather helmets, it's mostly due to the historical accuracy.  Thanks for the information, guys.  I'll keep an eye out!
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