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Author Topic: The Guild of Icarus: Aerospace Engineering and Aeronautical Club  (Read 3372 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #100 on: December 10, 2016, 03:18:17 am »

Alright, this is really interesting. One of the biggest problems in space exploration is the ridiculous amount of garbage that humanity has launched to low Earth orbit and even up to geostationary orbit, much further away from the Earth's surface.
The Japanese have come up with and are now beginning to test a sort of orbital garbage sweeper

I'm just starting to read on the subject, but I had dreamed many times of tackling this very issue.  The problem is that speeds necessary to stay in orbit close to Earth are very high and even if most objects are orbiting more or less along the Equator in the same direction as the rotation of Earth, you still have orbits that are not perfectly circular or are at a significant angle with respect to the Equator. This means that the differential of speed between two objects could be many thousands of miles per hour, up to 5 digits for polar orbits intersecting equatorial orbits. At those speeds even the smallest most innocent objects become lethal projectiles.

So the question is how to deal with a gigantic cloud of deadly debris around the world. Not an easy issue to take because most orbiting garbage is undetectable. The United States Air Force keeps track of the most detectable objects in low Earth orbit but removing those objects is a completely different matter.

In this article below the BBC presents a description of Japan's latest bid to deal with the problem: an orbiting tether which will slow down objects enough so they can descend into the atmosphere and let aerodynamic drag slow them down out of orbit into a fiery death...

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-38265676
« Last Edit: December 10, 2016, 03:21:53 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
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« Reply #101 on: December 12, 2016, 12:10:50 am »

Alright, this is really interesting. One of the biggest problems in space exploration is the ridiculous amount of garbage that humanity has launched to low Earth orbit and even up to geostationary orbit, much further away from the Earth's surface.
The Japanese have come up with and are now beginning to test a sort of orbital garbage sweeper

I'm just starting to read on the subject, but I had dreamed many times of tackling this very issue.  The problem is that speeds necessary to stay in orbit close to Earth are very high and even if most objects are orbiting more or less along the Equator in the same direction as the rotation of Earth, you still have orbits that are not perfectly circular or are at a significant angle with respect to the Equator. This means that the differential of speed between two objects could be many thousands of miles per hour, up to 5 digits for polar orbits intersecting equatorial orbits. At those speeds even the smallest most innocent objects become lethal projectiles.

So the question is how to deal with a gigantic cloud of deadly debris around the world. Not an easy issue to take because most orbiting garbage is undetectable. The United States Air Force keeps track of the most detectable objects in low Earth orbit but removing those objects is a completely different matter.

In this article below the BBC presents a description of Japan's latest bid to deal with the problem: an orbiting tether which will slow down objects enough so they can descend into the atmosphere and let aerodynamic drag slow them down out of orbit into a fiery death...

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-38265676


The ESA are planning some experimental missions to the same end, using ideas such as capturing errant satellites using harpoons and nets. The real problem is, as you have identified, the small pieces like nuts and fragments of metal, but which still have enough kinetic energy to punch a hole through a spacecraft's side.

Yours,
Miranda.
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Peter Brassbeard
Zeppelin Captain
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« Reply #102 on: December 12, 2016, 05:16:11 pm »

If only we had an aether wave grappler beam to pull passing debris out of orbit.
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morozow
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« Reply #103 on: December 13, 2016, 10:26:27 am »

The airplane "Farman-IV", built according to the drawings 1910

Odessa

Аэроклуб "Одесса". Первый полёт Одесского "Farman IV"
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Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #104 on: December 16, 2016, 12:35:57 am »

If only we had an aether wave grappler beam to pull passing debris out of orbit.


Well, if the 21st century name for an "aether wave grappler beam" is a laser, then that might just be possible - have a look towards the end of this article http://www.space.com/35008-comet-strike-danger-to-earth.html.

Yours,
Miranda.
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J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #105 on: December 16, 2016, 06:42:10 am »

If only we had an aether wave grappler beam to pull passing debris out of orbit.


Well, if the 21st century name for an "aether wave grappler beam" is a laser, then that might just be possible - have a look towards the end of this article http://www.space.com/35008-comet-strike-danger-to-earth.html.

Yours,
Miranda.


Rather than a grapple, this would be a deflector beam. The idea of using a laser for comets makes sense when you consider that blasting energy to icy bodies can result in jets of vapour or gases acting as thrusters on the comet, deviating its orbit.

Other than that, barring any jets, a body that needs to be deflected would presumably need to receive enough momentum from the colliding photos to actually deviate it's orbit.

I have heard of long term exposure to laser radiation which can over time significantly alter the orbit of an object, or propel an object through space. Generally speaking, the photon pressure is extremely low, but in the relative vacuum of space, and over long periods of time, the idea is the basis for probes or spaceships that could be accelerated to very high speeds, some significant percentage (say 25% of the speed of light). So it's possible that you could focus a laser long enough on a satellite to knock it's orbit.  Buf off the top of my head I don't know how much pressure you can get from say a very intense burst or set of bursts of a laser beam. 

Among some job applications for jobs involving secret government-sponsored research programmes, I have heard of projects which aim to concentrate ridiculously large amounts of energy in an extremely short duration laser pulse (directed energy weapons based on power amplification), which could actually vaporize, melt or otherwise push larger objects. But I need to do some calculations to see what is realistic or not (I'm definitely not an expert in the subject, so I'd have to re-invent the wheel and rely on my generalized knowledge starting from first principles)
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Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #106 on: December 16, 2016, 06:08:23 pm »

If only we had an aether wave grappler beam to pull passing debris out of orbit.


Well, if the 21st century name for an "aether wave grappler beam" is a laser, then that might just be possible - have a look towards the end of this article http://www.space.com/35008-comet-strike-danger-to-earth.html.

Yours,
Miranda.


Rather than a grapple, this would be a deflector beam. The idea of using a laser for comets makes sense when you consider that blasting energy to icy bodies can result in jets of vapour or gases acting as thrusters on the comet, deviating its orbit.

Other than that, barring any jets, a body that needs to be deflected would presumably need to receive enough momentum from the colliding photos to actually deviate it's orbit.

I have heard of long term exposure to laser radiation which can over time significantly alter the orbit of an object, or propel an object through space. Generally speaking, the photon pressure is extremely low, but in the relative vacuum of space, and over long periods of time, the idea is the basis for probes or spaceships that could be accelerated to very high speeds, some significant percentage (say 25% of the speed of light). So it's possible that you could focus a laser long enough on a satellite to knock it's orbit.  Buf off the top of my head I don't know how much pressure you can get from say a very intense burst or set of bursts of a laser beam. 

Among some job applications for jobs involving secret government-sponsored research programmes, I have heard of projects which aim to concentrate ridiculously large amounts of energy in an extremely short duration laser pulse (directed energy weapons based on power amplification), which could actually vaporize, melt or otherwise push larger objects. But I need to do some calculations to see what is realistic or not (I'm definitely not an expert in the subject, so I'd have to re-invent the wheel and rely on my generalized knowledge starting from first principles)


The article did talk about using the laser to de-orbit space debris. I'd imagine the idea would be to heat one side of the debris causing vaporisation of material, the reaction force from this altering the orbit to one which, at some point in its cycle, grazes through the upper atmosphere. Then let friction do the rest.

Yours,
Miranda.
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
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United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #107 on: December 31, 2016, 06:04:33 pm »

Happy New Year! Let's hope I get a new stab at relevant jobs this year. I'm continuing my efforts to get an internship in smaller Aerospace outfits as a way to upgrade my underemployment situation...
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