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Author Topic: Reconstruction: The Second Civil War  (Read 1537 times)
GCCC
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States


« on: August 31, 2015, 02:31:29 am »

The ugly side of the American Civil War.

(It can be safely argued that we Americans are still struggling with the legacies of the "peculiar institution" which was the principal cause of the war.*)

Part 1:
Reconstruction The Second Civil War {1 of 2} (Full Documentary)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOJch5C8aEg

Part 2:
Reconstruction The Second Civil War {2 of 2}

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-KNhf3ZkSuU






*Discussion of same has a tendency to become heated, so let's be mindful of that in the comments. I am, of course, always open to more in-depth debate via PM.



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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2015, 01:48:48 am »

The ugly side of the American Civil War.

(It can be safely argued that we Americans are still struggling with the legacies of the "peculiar institution" which was the principal cause of the war.*)

Part 1:
Reconstruction The Second Civil War {1 of 2} (Full Documentary)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOJch5C8aEg

Part 2:
Reconstruction The Second Civil War {2 of 2}
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-KNhf3ZkSuU






*Discussion of same has a tendency to become heated, so let's be mindful of that in the comments. I am, of course, always open to more in-depth debate via PM.






All parts of history are important. The ugly side as you call it should not be forgotten as it is part of the learning process for humanity.  It is, however, a bit controversial at times, and right now issues on Civil War remembrance are becoming highly political in the US. A week ago or so, the statue of Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederate States was brought down at the University of Texas at Austin.

Years ago, as a UT student, I wondered why they let those statues be on the grounds. As it happens the University dates back to the 1880s, and the benefactors of the University, such as Major Littlefield were staunch supporters of the Confederate cause.  Littlefield, besides providing funds for the statues of Confederate heroes, had enough of an influence on the architectural design, to have all the main entrances of buildings face south, as a type of political statement, ridiculous as that may sound! I can only wonder what the motivation was when the University was being built and the kind of arguments made by administrators of the University. Perhaps their discussions were very heated as well back then.

Source: http://civilwar.wikia.com/wiki/Reconstruction_era_of_the_United_States
Quote
Reconstruction policies were debated in the North when the war began, and commenced in earnest after the Emancipation Proclamation, issued on January 1, 1863. Reconstruction policies were implemented when a Confederate state came under the control of the Union Army. President Abraham Lincoln set up reconstructed governments in several southern states during the war, including Tennessee, Arkansas and Louisiana, and experimented with giving land to ex-slaves in South Carolina. President Andrew Johnson continued Lincoln's lenient plans despite the widespread bitterness over Lincoln's assassination. Johnson appointed new governors in the summer of 1865, and quickly declared that the war goals of national unity and the ending of slavery had been achieved, so that reconstruction was completed. Republicans in Congress refused to accept Johnson's lenient terms, rejected the new members of Congress selected by the South, and in 1865-66 broke with the president. A sweeping Republican victory in the 1866 Congressional elections in the North gave the Radical Republicans enough control of Congress that they over-rode Johnson's vetoes and began what is called "Radical reconstruction" in 1867.

Congress removed the civilian governments in the South[2] in 1867 and put the former Confederacy under the rule of the U.S. Army. The army then conducted new elections in which the freed slaves could vote while those who held leading positions under the Confederacy were denied the vote and could not run for office.

In ten states,[3] coalitions of Freedmen, recent arrivals from the North (Carpetbaggers), and white Southerners who supported Reconstruction (Scalawags) cooperated to form Republican state governments, which introduced various reconstruction programs, offered massive aid to railroads, built public schools, and raised taxes. Conservative opponents charged that Republican regimes were marred by widespread corruption. Violent opposition emerged in numerous localities under the name of the Ku Klux Klan, which led to federal intervention by President Ulysses S. Grant in 1870 that closed down the Klan. Conservative Democrats calling themselves "Redeemers" regained control state by state, sometimes using fraud and violence to control state elections. A deep national economic depression following the Panic of 1873 led to major Democratic gains in the North, the collapse of many railroad schemes in the South, and a growing sense of frustration in the North.

The end of Reconstruction was a staggered process, and the period of Republican control ended at different times in different states. With the Compromise of 1877, Army intervention in the South ceased and Republican control collapsed in the last three state governments in the South. This was followed by a period that white Southerners labeled Redemption, which saw the enactment of Jim Crow laws and (after 1890) the disenfranchisement of most blacks. The Democratic Party dominated the "Solid South" with few breaks into the 1960s, when the civil rights and voting rights of African-Americans were restored by Congress.


The Reconstruction period must have been a very difficult one, whose wounds and resentment continued and gave rise to hatred, political and racial as well in the 20th C.  It was not until the 1960s when the late President Kennedy and his succesor, Lyndon B. Johnson, begn to forcefully start erasing that institutionalized hate. Too many years has passed and the South needed to move into the modern era. Remember that Johnson was from Texas. The Lyndon B Johnson Presidential Library is also at the University of Texas at Austin, and I always wondered about the irony of having both sides of history being embodied by the buildings on campus...
« Last Edit: September 14, 2015, 01:52:56 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

GCCC
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******
United States United States


« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2015, 04:53:38 pm »

I often refer to our current state constitution as the Racist Constitution, since it was written and adopted as a direct response to Gov. Edmund J. Davis' (our last Reconstruction governor) support for blacks. As an example, for some reason educating former slaves was particularly vehement to the traitors.

And so it goes.

I, too, often wondered why there were monuments to secessionists, especially non-Texas secessionists, anywhere in the state. But then, I grew up in an era where I was taught the difference between a n(that word) and a "colored" person. I remember having a black gentlemen introduced to me by having the elders of my family tell me, "Now, you don't ever call Mr. X a n-----; he's a colored man." I was so indoctrinated that I was horrified to learn that my fourth grade teacher was to be a black woman. She turned out to be one of the best teachers I ever had.

Indoctrination of any kind is hard to shake. That's why I tell my students it is the responsibility of each generation to be better than the one previous.

I'll stop now before I get too preachy. I'm very disgusted by what appears to be the majority attitude throughout the South, and especially in Texas.

(See? It's still ugly. But yes, it is also absolutely imperative that the ugliness not be forgotten, so that we may continue with positive progress for humanity.)
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Captain Lyerly
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Ukraine Ukraine


At the helm of the Frumious Bandersnatch


« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2015, 03:43:22 pm »

Yes, you already got too preachy.


Chas.
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Captain Sir Charles A. Lyerly, O.B.T.
Soldier of Fortune and Gentleman Adventurer
wire: captain_lyerly, at wire office "Yahoo dot Qom"

"You'd think he'd learn."
"Heh! De best minions neffer do!"
GCCC
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2015, 04:42:29 pm »

Indeed.

But surely I can be forgiven somewhat. I'll admit I don't know enough about Ukrainian history, but I live in a country where some states still fly flags that are suspiciously reminiscent of the flags of the secessionist states, thus helping to keep this wound open.

Like this one, for example:
(Behind the spoiler, so if this is a sensitive subject for any readers...)

But...Hey, look! A picture of a cat!


http://aliosh-k.com/?cat=1
« Last Edit: September 18, 2015, 08:05:15 pm by GCCC » Logged
Captain Lyerly
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Ukraine Ukraine


At the helm of the Frumious Bandersnatch


« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2015, 02:06:16 am »

Sorry, not from Ukraine - changed it a bit ago to reflect personal feelings.

I am from Chattanooga, Tennessee.  My family has lived there quite some time; a good part of my family has lived in that area for the best part of a thousand years (Cherokee, you know).  And, yes, there has been bad feeling on both sides of the subject, to the point that its current reflection in active, everyday politics, (redacted).  So, since I live very close to a military installation that was used for troops of a foreign occupation (perhaps not on paper, but if it looks like a duck and acts like a duck...)

In other words, YES, this is political.  And not just historical-political, but every day's news feed political. 

It is past time to drop this subject on a forum that has just as many people from one end of the political spectrum as the other, and we should all expect our political neutrality here to be respected.


Chas.
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GCCC
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United States United States


« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2015, 02:24:50 am »

Ah! The forbears of my name came to Texas from Tennessee (the three surviving brothers, who fought for the Confederacy; the other brother and the father fought for the Union). I see we share some common heritage, then.

I didn't catch some of your references, but that's okay, because I agree with you; the subject's touchy, and we need to respect everyone's opinions.

 
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2015, 06:05:50 am »

[mod hat]
Gentlemen! Play. Nice. Not saying it again.
[/mod hat]
« Last Edit: September 19, 2015, 06:09:17 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
GCCC
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States


« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2015, 05:06:20 am »

Believed I was. Couldn't find anything incendiary in my last post (Sept. 19, 2:24:50 am).
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J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2015, 05:25:27 am »

Believed I was. Couldn't find anything incendiary in my last post (Sept. 19, 2:24:50 am).

My warning is not aimed at a particular post or individual.
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GCCC
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United States United States


« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2015, 05:48:54 am »

'Kay.
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