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Author Topic: Things that make you go WTF? MkII  (Read 60252 times)
Keith_Beef
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« Reply #275 on: March 11, 2016, 10:25:51 pm »

I lived in Newcastle upon Tyne for a few years; I had no trouble understanding the accent when I arrived up there and can still pull off a reasonable imitation of it. Years of watching Auf Wiedersehen Pet must have helped.

In that clip I heard a few instances of 'gadger' for 'bloke' that I always associate more with either Mackam or Gypsy speech than proper Geordie. The rest was proper gibberish.

As a whole, it is almost as if it was done tongue in cheek… how could it have been accidentally so bad?

Oh, and the pipes… maybe they were meant to be Northumbrian smallpipes.

Maybe somebody had done a little bit of research (and a little learning being a dangerous thing, and all that).
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« Reply #276 on: March 12, 2016, 04:11:45 am »

WHAT THE FLYING FLIPPITY F**K IN THE NAME OF ALL THAT'S HOLY IN CHRISTENDOM WAS THAT?!

I mean I know Americans have trouble with British accents in general, and more specifically 'Northern' accents (as do a lot of actors, see Russell Crowe in Robin Hood, or Jude Law in the remake of Sleuth) but seriously? The vibe I got off the guy was more 'Irishman with brain damage' than 'Geordie'. If this is what the Yanks are going to keep doing to us, I reckon whenever an American TV/film producer wants a character with a regional British accent, they should be dropped in the middle of that place i.e. Manchester/Tyneside/Rural Yorkshire and LEFT until such time as they can pass for a local.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVjL0i74Drw

my wtf is the fact that the new housemate came back from the emergency room a couple days ago, distraught. Apparently there has been a mix up after changing doctors after the move. One of her prescriptions was given in 1/3 the usual doses, and she's been taking them at the same amouts as usual. Thus they ran out 3 times as fast as expected and they won't give her more... because they are powerful psychoactive meds with a heavy risk of dependence and addiction and whose withdrawl symptoms are said to be worse than cocaine addicts. She figured it would be a chance to try and get off the meds anyway. Five days in and she went to the emergency room after many phone calls to many doctors to try and sort out a better approach that doesn't carry the risk of psychotic episodes and seizures.

The ER had told her they wouldn't give here anything for it and wouldn't fill the presription. I helped her go through the data on the drug and risks ect, and form a plan of action. 1 hour later she went back to the ER in the midst of a panic attack.

3 hours later she returned with 4 doses to tide her over until she could get things worked out. She went to bed.

It's been two days, her room is wide open and there has been no sign of her since then. She had mentioned that she has previously checked herself in to inpatient care before and would do it again if need be. I'm assuming that is what happened.

I'm mostly feeling like WTF is the right reaction for this going forward? we have somebody on massive doses of downers (more than just this one med, she has others) for emotional health problems, and now her meds have been disrupted and she's talking about wanting to quit them... I'm not sure that's a good situation to have in this household with the rest of us here, including a toddler and an elderly man. This seems like the kind of thing one should discuss with prospective roommates before one moves in.

I can't exactly hold it against her, I'm going through my own emotional issues right now, but man this really isn't a great time or place for this. Sign, WTF?
« Last Edit: March 12, 2016, 05:25:35 am by rovingjack » Logged

Sir Henry
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« Reply #277 on: March 12, 2016, 08:40:57 am »

You don't like "English" accent in American films? You from this pain?

HAHAHA!

Treat it with humor. Without it, I would have burst with anger looking at the Russian in your movies.
The first time I went to Russia we had a guide with the most wonderful accent - she had been taught English by a Geordie and the two combined to create a beautiful lilt that I've never heard anything else like.
A later Russian teacher who learned English from a Glaswegian had somehow only managed to pick up the harsher tones, but was equally surreal.  Smiley
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Banfili
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« Reply #278 on: March 12, 2016, 12:52:09 pm »

There are regional variations in accent in Australia. Not quite as pronounced, and possibly non-Australians may not pick up the subtleties.
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Drew P
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« Reply #279 on: March 12, 2016, 02:56:28 pm »

It's a TV show, not a real account whatsoever, not even close, made up story, made up this and that, errors everywhere.....it shouldn't be taken so seriously, ever. If they were to get the accents correct, what about the rest of the stories? 
Most TV is useless anyhow so......


Now try a Chicago accent, bet you get that wrong, too.
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« Reply #280 on: March 12, 2016, 07:06:16 pm »

You don't like "English" accent in American films? You from this pain?

HAHAHA!

Treat it with humor. Without it, I would have burst with anger looking at the Russian in your movies.
The first time I went to Russia we had a guide with the most wonderful accent - she had been taught English by a Geordie and the two combined to create a beautiful lilt that I've never heard anything else like.
A later Russian teacher who learned English from a Glaswegian had somehow only managed to pick up the harsher tones, but was equally surreal.  Smiley

If only the language. The language is funny. The film "Red heat", Schwarzenegger has even spawned a few memes.

The simplest and most common:

1) we are not eternal winter, when snow, slush, and frost. We also have summer, when the heat around the greens and the sun.

2) we bearded men is not much. And before that, while wasn't hipsters, they were even smaller.

3) We don't run system. And KGB does not run system. And even military, systems go only when it is necessary.
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Siliconous Skumins
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« Reply #281 on: March 13, 2016, 12:14:03 am »

For a reference to a real Geordie accent for those who have never heard it, here is a Geordie comedian from the 70's / 80's. This is Bobby Thompson, and most of his comedy (and most other north-east comedians) is based around a common issue at the time - Debt and lack of money. Mind you everything he says is true - he really was always in debt, and the bailiffs were always round his house. He used to live in the same street as my Grandad, so I know for a fact that most of his comedy is based around real events.  Grin

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« Reply #282 on: March 13, 2016, 06:09:53 am »

I don't know what the problem is.  I understood at least 8 words. 




maybe 7.
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« Reply #283 on: March 14, 2016, 07:16:10 pm »

It's a TV show, not a real account whatsoever, not even close, made up story, made up this and that, errors everywhere.....it shouldn't be taken so seriously, ever. If they were to get the accents correct, what about the rest of the stories? 
Most TV is useless anyhow so......

Now try a Chicago accent, bet you get that wrong, too.

If they're too lazy to bother with the suspension of disbelief in a detective show. Then I also expect

a) all the actors to change on a show by show basis. Including the "regular" ones twice per episode.
b) one entire episode shot with the camera pointed at peoples feet.
c) people to die and get magically resurrected with monkey masks on 5 seconds later.

It's the thin end of the wedge. There is no excuse for shoddy workmanship and lack of preparation. This is both.
There people are too lazy to get it right. I for one cannot abide sloth when there's a job to be done.
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« Reply #284 on: March 15, 2016, 07:24:05 am »

I'm going to play psychologist and read the subtext here. Indignation is more related to a deep seated fear for loss of culture. There is no excuse for shoddy workmanship,  that is true,  and part of the reason I never watched Castle regularly was it's low grade treatment of Steampunk and other subcultures. I got the impression that their TV show was garbage. Nevertheless I read far more indignation in these responses.

The question is how harmful or significant is for the British people,  and more specifically the people from Newcastle that an American TV show can't or won't bother to differentiate between a very specific regional English accent and presumably some Celtic accent stereotype.  Something to ponder about. 

Pardon me if I seem a bit insensitive here. But how many times have English speakers been responsible for mangling someone else's culture on TV or radio? Even amongst each other. Sometimes I think that humans are wired to be prejudiced.  But in reality that is that is the way humans fill in the blank lines in our knowledge about other's cultures.

What the UNITED STATES thinks of EUROPE (by Aleix Saló)


 "Throw a shrimp on the barbie?" You mean Australians don't wrestle alligators for fun? Texans wear wide hats and guns like Cowboys and are very hot tempered. French men always wear funny thin moustaches, and everyone knows New York city is a post apocalyptic wasteland.

In a way I can understand the cultural insult.  I really can.  Trust me, I know.  But in the end, what is the significance of the damage? Perhaps Brits feel the sting of prejudice more than say French, Russians or Mexicans,  because the latter three are far more accustomed to the insults,  and after all, the British invented the language both Americans and British are supposed to speak.  I see it's a bit more personal when the one insulting you speaks your language. More inexcusable, shall we say?

Look. This in the end is a problem stemming from IGNORANCE. The only solution to the problem is EDUCATION.  I'm not throwing the ball back to the injured party,  but in a sense Mr. Skummins suggested the right thing,  which is to complain,  clarify and educate without insulting.
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« Reply #285 on: March 16, 2016, 12:35:43 am »

In parts of the USA, especially it seems in NY and Boston areas, there are a great number of people who are fiercely proud of their Irish roots. St.Patricks Day is something of a big deal, and rivers get dosed with a few thousand gallons of green food colouring to celebrate. Irish themed pubs and bars are common, and even sections of the cities are devoted to Irish culture.

Now then - suppose a TV company made an episode of a popular TV show that featured an Irish character. Now if that character was factually portrayed as a stereotype who spoke in an incomprehensible babble that didn't even sound remotely like it was an Irish accent, and that ALL Irish talk and act like that.....I'm sure there would be more than a little outrage from those of Irish decent. Pretty sure it would make a news report or two, and result in some form of public apology.

Or from another perspective: Same production company features an African character, and this character is shown to be some kind of "spear-chucking native" who only speaks with "Oooga-muga wallawalla bingbang" as he's from "Bongo-bongo Land", and that ALL African people speak and act like that...  Yeah, there would be an interesting result for sure! Because that can only be described as '"Racist", and that's putting in mildly.  Undecided



In the case of the Castle episode, I think (speaking as a Geordie) that all the indignation we Geordies show in regards to the portrayal of the Geordie character is due purely to the fact that is just SO piss-poor despite the fact they obviously did actual research to find real Geordie words. I mean a BAD attempt at the Geordie accent is forgivable - there are loads of bad imitations, we are used to it. But this was just so far off the mark, that it actually does feel quite insulting. Then the production staff added the Celtic flavour to the incidental music, because anything with an accent must be Irish OR Scottish right? That music score really does come across as though they are taking the piss.

To get an idea at just how bad the accent was, if that actor was to arrive here in Newcastle, and he was to to try that accent here - I doubt he would survive more than 10 minutes before somebody punched him in the face because they assumed he was taking the piss out of them. I mean really, somebody would take offense at that and he would end up in hospital. Try that on a Friday night in Newcastle's Bigg Market (a popular drinking area with many pubs and clubs) and it would be a DEATH SENTENCE.  Undecided



Don't get me wrong, we Geordies and the British at large, can all take a bit of ribbing about our accents and mannerisms - hell, we all take the piss out of ourselves and each other all the time. We don't mind a bit of parody or even direct poking fun about the way we speak and act, infact Geordies are well known to poke fun at our own expense.
Now if we were talking about an episode of Family Guy or South Park with a satirical Geordie character that nobody understands, this would be a non-issue. But that Castle episode was something else. Even non Geordie British people felt it was so awful as to not even be funny, and felt equally as insulted by it.


Compare the Castle episode with this clip of two real Geordies talking (clip from a 1980's TV show called 'Auf Wiedersehen, Pet'):

Auf Wiedersehen, Pet - Classic Clip


Castle: The Geordie




Now I grant you that it may be somewhat hard to follow a Geordie accent, but you should be able to understand enough to follow along with the conversation and know what they are talking about (mostly). Now try listening to that castle episode again. I'm a Geordie, and even I could only pick out a few words. What you hear in the Castle episode, is exactly what *I* hear too... It's not just a poor imitation of an accent, it's actually incomprehensible gibberish - he could be saying ANYTHING or nothing at all, I just can't tell. Undecided
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« Reply #286 on: March 17, 2016, 08:19:59 am »

Now then - suppose a TV company made an episode of a popular TV show that featured an Irish character. Now if that character was factually portrayed as a stereotype who spoke in an incomprehensible babble that didn't even sound remotely like it was an Irish accent, and that ALL Irish talk and act like that.....I'm sure there would be more than a little outrage from those of Irish decent. Pretty sure it would make a news report or two, and result in some form of public apology.

Or from another perspective: Same production company features an African character, and this character is shown to be some kind of "spear-chucking native" who only speaks with "Oooga-muga wallawalla bingbang" as he's from "Bongo-bongo Land", and that ALL African people speak and act like that...  Yeah, there would be an interesting result for sure! Because that can only be described as '"Racist", and that's putting in mildly.  Undecided


The sad thing is that those two scenarios you painted have already happened -many times- exactly as you described, and involving the same peoples you describe. I've seen it all before in history books as well as my own lifetime. It is a part of history, and especially true of American history.

You see, stereotypes had a more nefarious origin other than just plain ignorance. The ugly racist stereotype was a necessary tool to dehumanize those whom you wished to marginalize, and it was oft used in anti-immigrant political cartoons of the 19th. C.  When you need political power, all you need to do is turn toward the mentally weak and misinformed, and then paint ugly pictures about the group you wish to marginalize. This is as true today as it was in the 19th. C.

https://books.google.com/books?id=pvzAZS4sT8sC&pg=PA46&lpg=PA46&dq=Chicago+History+newspaper+Immigrants+are+offal+of+Europe#v=onepage&q=Chicago%20History%20newspaper%20Immigrants%20are%20offal%20of%20Europe&f=false

This process of negative stereotyping was and currently is repeated in waves throughout American history.  Waves of migrants would come in and then become ostracised or marginalized under the pretext that they were taking American jobs and exhaust the available resources. The ugly stereotypes often followed the migrant waves across history. Africans, Irish, Italians, Chinese, Poles, and Mexicans to name a few.

http://www.nytimes.com/1986/10/26/weekinreview/resentment-against-new-immigrants.html

Worse - this being a nation of immigrants, once your own group was safely incorporated into the social fabric, it was usually your group (whoever that might be, the Irish, Italian, etc.) the one who would most viciously attack a new incoming immigrant group... This is a historical fact.

As a reminder, racial caricatures were common throughout the 20th C, until rather recent times, and most often directed against people living in the same country (!)  Not always necessarily malicious, these caricatures nevertheless did have hateful origins, dating back to politically charged times, and regardless of intent, they always offend and polarize. Today a number of children's TV episodes from the 20th. C are no longer considered politically correct to run on TV.

How do I feel about that?  I don't know. I do miss Speedy Gonzales, but I understand why some would be very offended by that character.



« Last Edit: March 17, 2016, 09:21:51 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Sir Henry
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« Reply #287 on: March 17, 2016, 01:32:11 pm »

I do miss Speedy Gonzales, but I understand why some would be very offended by that character.
But Speedy was a winner, so not a particularly negative stereotype. The Warner Brothers cartoons tended not to dwell on the negative racism, thankfully.
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« Reply #288 on: March 17, 2016, 05:40:01 pm »

I do miss Speedy Gonzales, but I understand why some would be very offended by that character.
But Speedy was a winner, so not a particularly negative stereotype. The Warner Brothers cartoons tended not to dwell on the negative racism, thankfully.

True, he was the hero and not portrayed as the daft one. The bad guy was the "gringo" cat, played by Sylvester, and he represented greed living in the large Hacienda (because that's the only type of dwelling Mexicans live in, apparently).

Nevertheless the appearance and manner of speech were highly stereotypical. A highly stylized Mexican accent - that is far from actual speech. Small stature and dark skin. Other mice colleagues were portrayed as lazy or drunk, and as not all stereotypes are negative, the female mice were all sexy, because we all know Latin women are hot. The country side is invariably a sleepy hot desert with cacti or a beach.


It still is a caricature that many Mexicans, will reject. A highly stylized stereotype of Mexicans in the mid 20th C.  Stereotypes today are much worse.
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« Reply #289 on: March 19, 2016, 01:09:40 am »

I'm going to play psychologist and read the subtext here. Indignation is more related to a deep seated fear for loss of culture. There is no excuse for shoddy workmanship,  that is true,  and part of the reason I never watched Castle regularly was it's low grade treatment of Steampunk and other subcultures. I got the impression that their TV show was garbage. Nevertheless I read far more indignation in these responses.

The question is how harmful or significant is for the British people,  and more specifically the people from Newcastle that an American TV show can't or won't bother to differentiate between a very specific regional English accent and presumably some Celtic accent stereotype.  Something to ponder about. 

Pardon me if I seem a bit insensitive here. But how many times have English speakers been responsible for mangling someone else's culture on TV or radio? Even amongst each other. Sometimes I think that humans are wired to be prejudiced.  But in reality that is that is the way humans fill in the blank lines in our knowledge about other's cultures.

 "Throw a shrimp on the barbie?" You mean Australians don't wrestle alligators for fun? Texans wear wide hats and guns like Cowboys and are very hot tempered. French men always wear funny thin moustaches, and everyone knows New York city is a post apocalyptic wasteland.

In a way I can understand the cultural insult.  I really can.  Trust me, I know.  But in the end, what is the significance of the damage? Perhaps Brits feel the sting of prejudice more than say French, Russians or Mexicans,  because the latter three are far more accustomed to the insults,  and after all, the British invented the language both Americans and British are supposed to speak.  I see it's a bit more personal when the one insulting you speaks your language. More inexcusable, shall we say?

Look. This in the end is a problem stemming from IGNORANCE. The only solution to the problem is EDUCATION.  I'm not throwing the ball back to the injured party,  but in a sense Mr. Skummins suggested the right thing,  which is to complain,  clarify and educate without insulting.

Well, there is taking insult, and there is being thrown out of the story through breaking the suspension of disbelief.

For example, many years ago I sae a BBC production of, oh, some ghost story or other based on a Victorianish short story with a couple of young newlywed Americans in Britain.

The actors playing the Americans had not great but not the worst fake American accents.  I was willing to allow for them as characters.

Then they named the town in the US they were from, which I chance to be familiar with from summer vacations:  Waukesha, Wisconsin.

Only, instead of pronouncing it with the proper, local, Native-American-based pronunciation, roughly "WAHK-shah", they pronounced it "waw-KEE-sha".

That threw me badly out of the story.  It was like the time my friend heard a visiting celebrity call Menomonee Falls "MEE-noh-MAHN-ee" rather than the local "m'NAH-m'nee".

Mispronouncing names is pretty common, and even if one is not offended by it, it can make it harder to take characters seriously as what they are supposed to be.

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« Reply #290 on: March 20, 2016, 06:20:16 am »

...Then they named the town in the US they were from, which I chance to be familiar with from summer vacations:  Waukesha, Wisconsin.

Only, instead of pronouncing it with the proper, local, Native-American-based pronunciation, roughly "WAHK-shah", they pronounced it "waw-KEE-sha".

That threw me badly out of the story.  It was like the time my friend heard a visiting celebrity call Menomonee Falls "MEE-noh-MAHN-ee" rather than the local "m'NAH-m'nee"...


That may be a case of "Not Their Fault". If you've never heard the word pronounced by the locals, then "waw-KEE-sha" and "MEE-noh-MAHN-ee" make perfect sense. I would probably even expect tourists to mispronounce the name, especially if none of the locals corrected them. (This may, in fact, be the point, to mark them as outsiders.) No one unfamiliar with the place who hears "NAG-a-ditch" is going to be able to find Natchitoches, Louisiana on a map. Anyone familiar with proper German pronunciation who's looking for the Witte Museum in San Antonio, Texas is going to be rather snippily corrected by the locals telling you it's the "Witty". Refugio, Texas is pronounced "reh-FURY-oh" for no reason I've ever heard explained. If you've never encountered a member of the Atakapan tribe, you'd never know they pronounce it "ata-KWAP-uhn". In America we say "KER-nahl" for the military rank "colonel" and the English say "leff-TEN-ahnt" for "lieutenant".

This phenomenon is dealt with humorously in the following:

Shibboleth

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOd3lwluQIw
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« Reply #291 on: March 20, 2016, 07:29:11 am »

I would go as far as not necessarily letting the locals have the last word on pronunciation.  Some of the local Texas Spanish names are pronounced the way an old cowboy would pronounce them. Clearly the local pronunciation is flat out wrong considering the names are Spanish names, and already have their own correct pronunciation.

Manchaca, correctly pronounced "man-chah-cah" in Spanish is "man-chack" for the local non Mexican locals.

Guadalupe, correctly pronounced "goo-ah-dah-loo-peh" in Spanish is shortened to "Guah-dah-loop" by the locals

Pedernales, which is "peh-dur-nah-lehs" in Spanish is pronounced "peh-dur-nah-lees" by the locals

Tamal ("Tah-mahl") corn cakes in spanish are known as "tah-mah-lee cakes" by the locals.

I can tolerate it as long as they don't say "tohr-tee-las" instead of "tohr-tee-yahs" (Tortillas) or when the poser Spanish speaking chef who is trying to impress (eg Bobby Flay), adds a gratuitous "gn" sound (eg lasaGNa), to the name Habanero (the chile pepper, literally meaning "from Habana"*), so you hear the incorrect "ha-bah-gneh-roh" instead of the proper "ha-bah-ney-roh."

*Havana is English spelling, Habana is Spanish spelling

Perhaps the latter being a confusion between the letters n (pronunce as in the English "n") and ñ (pronounced as in "gn" in Italian), which in fact are two different letters in the Spanish alphabet.  

Also probably due that there is another chile pepper called Jalapeño (lit. "from the State of Jalapa") which rightfully uses the ñ (gn) sound,as in many other names referencing geographic locations

Usage example:

Chihuahueño (e.g. Chihuahua ("chee-wah-wah") as in the Mexican hairless dog) <-> Literally from State of Chihuahua

Tampiqueño ("tahm-pee-keh-GNoh") <-> Lit. from the State of Tampico.

Contrast to the usage in

Aduanero ("Ah-doo-ah-neh-roh") as in "customs officer" <-> literally meaning (implied male) "from the customs office" (Aduana)

OK Spanish lesson over. Homework is due on Tuesday.  Grin
                  
« Last Edit: March 20, 2016, 07:35:19 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #292 on: March 20, 2016, 01:26:27 pm »

While on the subject of Spanish names, I got pulled up by a Mexican colleague when I pronounced Oaxaca as ɔaːʃˈaka; she pronounces it waˈxaka.
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« Reply #293 on: March 20, 2016, 04:34:46 pm »

^^^^
the above confuses me XD

but then again most dutch will say Gor-in-kem to Gorinchem, while it's obviously Gor-kum
and Woudrichem is now Wow-dri-kem but woor-kem
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« Reply #294 on: March 20, 2016, 09:44:46 pm »

^^^^
the above confuses me XD

but then again most dutch will say Gor-in-kem to Gorinchem, while it's obviously Gor-kum
and Woudrichem is now Wow-dri-kem but woor-kem

Those Dutch town names remind me of English towns like Worcester (wʊstər), Leicester (ˈlɛstər), Howick (ˈhoʊ.ɪk) and Warwick (ˈwɒrɪk). When I talked to American friends about going apple-picking in New York state, they didn't understand where I'd been until I pointed out the place on the map… over there they really do pronounce it ˈwɔɹwɪk.
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« Reply #295 on: March 20, 2016, 10:18:28 pm »

While on the subject of Spanish names, I got pulled up by a Mexican colleague when I pronounced Oaxaca as ɔaːʃˈaka; she pronounces it waˈxaka.

It's the difference between modern Spanish and the Original Native Mexican pronuciation. I imagine you are using the intergral symbol as an English phonetical symbol for "sh". The "sh" sound is the way pronounced before the arrival of the Spanish.

In the 16th. C. the Spanish clergy used the letter "X" (from the Greek letter xi) to denote any sound they couldn't pronounce easily in the New World (mostly the New Spain). As a consequence there are a lot of Mexican names that have the letter "x."

The original pronunciation by the natives in most of those words was a very soft "sh" sound.  So technically Mexico is "Meh-she-coh" in the original Nahuatl (Aztec) tongue.  The State of Tlaxcala then becomes something like "tlah-shcah-lah" which is  a bit off from the way it's pronounced today.

BUT the Spanish could not pronounce the "sh' sound properly, and instead would pronounce it like a "j" in Spanish, or like a hard "h" in English so Mexico was pronounced "Meh-he-coh" by the Spanish, which is the way we pronounce it today (noting in Spanish the J is always pronounced like a hard H in English).

Most of the names with X are pronounced in the Spanish way, and only those who are trying to be politically correct will use the original "sh" sound.

            Spanish/modern Mexican pronunciation        Native (mostly Nahuatl) Pronunciation
                                                                              (use a very soft sh sound)

Mexico                 "Meh-he-co"                                       "Meh-she-coh"
Tlaxcala                "Tlah-ska-lah"                                    "Tlah-shka-lah"
Huixquilucan         "Who-is-key-loo-can"                           "Who-ish-key-loo-can"
Oaxaca                 "Wah-ha-kah"                                   "Oh-ah-sha-ka"

Try to pronounce in the Native American pronunciation in vowels and you will see that it fits very well with known Native American accents

Some places changed their spelling over time; I imagine (I'm not certain) for example, that Tabaxco, became Tabasco.

The practice of using X also has many other origins, but mostly Christian from antiquity usage, where the shape of the cross was instrumental in its choice as an abbreviation for "Christ" or  "Saviour" (Remember  "Xmas" in English?)

                          Spanish pronunciation   modern Spanish spelling   Traditional Mexican Spelling
Xavier (Saviour)         "Ha-vee-er"                     Javier                            Xavier

You will see both Xavier and Javier commonly in usage in Mexico.
And Xavier is also used in other languages (most notably the X-Men  Tongue  Grin)

Your home quiz in Nahuatl etymology will be due on Wednesday  Grin
« Last Edit: March 20, 2016, 10:38:58 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
creagmor
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« Reply #296 on: March 21, 2016, 08:13:19 am »

While I have, unfortunately, never been to Scotland, I have seen several videos, DVDs, and TV programs on it. I was more than a little surprised when I discovered that, even among the Scots, there didn't seem to be a consensus on the pronunciation of the word Celtic. Although I don't speak much Afrikaans, one thing I like about their language is that there is no C. e.g. circus is spelt sirkus. 
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“Love is an emotional thing, and whatever is emotional is opposed to that cold true reason which I place above all things.” Sherlock Holmes, in The Sign of Four.
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« Reply #297 on: March 21, 2016, 08:56:38 am »

While I have, unfortunately, never been to Scotland, I have seen several videos, DVDs, and TV programs on it. I was more than a little surprised when I discovered that, even among the Scots, there didn't seem to be a consensus on the pronunciation of the word Celtic. Although I don't speak much Afrikaans, one thing I like about their language is that there is no C. e.g. circus is spelt sirkus. 

#LearningEdinburghispronouncedEmbrah

And i think Afrikaans is weird XD
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« Reply #298 on: March 21, 2016, 09:53:14 am »

While I have, unfortunately, never been to Scotland, I have seen several videos, DVDs, and TV programs on it. I was more than a little surprised when I discovered that, even among the Scots, there didn't seem to be a consensus on the pronunciation of the word Celtic. Although I don't speak much Afrikaans, one thing I like about their language is that there is no C. e.g. circus is spelt sirkus.  
Not to worry, it's very simple.
'Seltic' is the sports team (be it soccer (Glasgow) or (in the plural for some reason) basketball (Boston)).
'Keltic' is the language, ethnicity, culture, art and absolutely everything else.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2016, 09:56:34 am by Sir Henry » Logged
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« Reply #299 on: March 21, 2016, 09:58:04 am »

While I have, unfortunately, never been to Scotland, I have seen several videos, DVDs, and TV programs on it. I was more than a little surprised when I discovered that, even among the Scots, there didn't seem to be a consensus on the pronunciation of the word Celtic. Although I don't speak much Afrikaans, one thing I like about their language is that there is no C. e.g. circus is spelt sirkus.  
Not to worry, it's very simple.
'Seltic' is the sports team (be it soccer (Glasgow) or (in the plural for some reason) basketball (Boston)).
'Keltic' is the language, ethnicity, culture, art and absolutely everything else.

unless my dad sais it, then it's always seltik.
Granted: my dad doesn't speak English.
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