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Author Topic: Things that make you go WTF? MkII  (Read 65197 times)
MWBailey
Rogue Ætherlord
*
United States United States


"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #1025 on: May 23, 2020, 03:24:20 pm »

In other, largely insignificant news, my favorite longsleeved shirt has developed a hole in the left elbow. Trying to decide whether to patch it or darn it, but it's only been six months since i bought it! W the actual F?!
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Walk softly and carry a big banjo...

""quid statis aspicientes in infernum"
SeVeNeVeS
Immortal
**
England England



« Reply #1026 on: May 23, 2020, 04:14:27 pm »

Hmmmm, see I was brought up in the early 60's, 2 eggs in a mug topped with full fat milk beaten with a fork, the milk makes it fluff up and makes it appear bigger and shoved between 2 slices of bread fills yer tummy.

Beef dripping on toast, covered with salt was another regular.

Raw bacon rind was considered a treat.

Then we found the first Vesta chow mein in the 70's. A monthly grand feast.

Welcome to the new world.........

Uuum, as for coffee, I'm an out of the jar, instant man myself, In France years ago I had the most intense coffee experience from the smallest of cups........... Strong to say the least.

« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 04:29:12 pm by SeVeNeVeS » Logged

Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #1027 on: May 23, 2020, 11:43:25 pm »

There are some people out there who can't even boil water, let alone an egg! And as for a nice omelette ....!

My dad taught all three of we kids how to cook basics, so at least we wouldn't starve while he was away working, and two of us took to to it like ducks to water, and even my older brother cooks for himself now, and keeps his little flat nice! Wasn't always the way. My younger brother is chef quality, and I'm a pretty good cook. The cooking gene is strong in my dad's side of the family - a bit like the force! And as for coffee ... has to be pretty good to pass the test!

And speaking of ... I just may go and make myself a cheese omelette for breakfast, and coffee!
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 11:57:58 pm by Banfili » Logged
Darkhound
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



« Reply #1028 on: May 24, 2020, 12:44:22 pm »

In my Junior High School (@12-14 year olds), every boy took a course called Domestic Survival. Grocery shopping, simple cooking, basic ssewing repairs for thick-fingered batchelors, etc. I have been grateful for this many times!
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"Stupidity is a curse with which even the Gods struggle in vain. Ignorance we can fix."
Sorontar
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia


All ideas should have wings


WWW
« Reply #1029 on: May 24, 2020, 01:12:51 pm »

In junior high school, we had to do a subject called home economics. The only numbers it discussed was how much flour in the recipe, how many calories per serving and how many wads of dough can you throw onto the ceiling when the teacher isn't watching.

What they should have been teaching us was how the taxation and electorial systems worked so we could fill out our own taxation reports and understand how to elect a politician (and minimise the chances of the rival getting elected). Both are skills that most Aussies have to use (by law). We have to pay tax and vote! Instead they thought they better focus on teaching us how to cook.

Sorontar
who also had to do typing, technical drawing, needlework, metalwork and woodwork, of which the needlework has been most beneficial over the years for costumes.
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Sorontar, Captain of 'The Aethereal Dancer'
Advisor to HM Engineers on matters aethereal, aeronautic and cosmographic
http://eyrie.sorontar.com
Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #1030 on: May 24, 2020, 01:49:14 pm »

When I hit high school Home Economics had just been dropped from the curriculum the year before, as had typing and commerce - three indispensable subjects that everyone should learn!(IMHO!)

I picked up typing in 1970, had already learned how to cook and budget, and did a Cert III in Public Administration a bit later on. The best subject in the Cert III was 'Government and the Public Service', which I think should be compulsory for every Australian public servant (civil servant for the UK) and every existing and aspiring politician. Brilliant subject altogether. I went to a convent school for girls only, so no metalwork or woodwork, which I would have loved, but I did carry art all the way through. Sewing was the alternative to art.
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Deimos
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #1031 on: May 24, 2020, 01:50:03 pm »

In the 70s (when I was in High School) neither shop nor Home Ec (as it was called) was required, nor was typing.
I took typing as an elective.
I learned woodworking and "handyman" type repairs and how to use hand and power tools from my dad, an electrical engineer by profession, but a tinkerer by choice. Learned cooking and sewing from my Mom, learned how to budget, balance a cheque book  and do my own taxes just from living with frugal parents.
Learned electronics in the military and how to fabricate stuff by watching the techs in the [aerospace] labs build prototypes.  
  
ALL OF IT has proven useful, and given me confidence in my ability to do something or learn something new.

"Whether you think you can do something, or think you can't, you're probably right."  
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Here is a test to find out if your mission in life is complete:
If you're alive, it isn't. -- Lauren Bacall

"You can tell a man's vices by his friends, his virtues by his enemies."

"Only the paranoid survive."
Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #1032 on: May 24, 2020, 10:15:33 pm »

In the 70s (when I was in High School) neither shop nor Home Ec (as it was called) was required, nor was typing.
I took typing as an elective.
I learned woodworking and "handyman" type repairs and how to use hand and power tools from my dad, an electrical engineer by profession, but a tinkerer by choice. Learned cooking and sewing from my Mom, learned how to budget, balance a cheque book  and do my own taxes just from living with frugal parents.
Learned electronics in the military and how to fabricate stuff by watching the techs in the [aerospace] labs build prototypes.  
  
ALL OF IT has proven useful, and given me confidence in my ability to do something or learn something new.

"Whether you think you can do something, or think you can't, you're probably right."  

My dad was a believer in learning and doing - and early 'lifelong learning' enthusiast. So, I learned to strip down and maintain a lawn mower, including changing the blades, basic maintenance on a car, changing a tyre, solder, basic timber repair and maintenance, put new glass in windows (in the days of putty!) and all those useful, practical things.

A family friend later taught me some electronics. Self-taught artist. More 'ladylike' activities such as hand sewing I picked up along the way, along with machine sewing, needlework in the form of embroidery and tapestry, and beadwork. Pottery and enamelling were also added a bit later on. What you might call 'a well-rounded education', which is still ongoing!

I have used all of it, and am still learning more skills - what better life can there be!
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