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Author Topic: Things that make you go WTF? MkII  (Read 71619 times)
MWBailey
Rogue Ætherlord
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United States United States


"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #1025 on: May 23, 2020, 03:24:20 pm »

In other, largely insignificant news, my favorite longsleeved shirt has developed a hole in the left elbow. Trying to decide whether to patch it or darn it, but it's only been six months since i bought it! W the actual F?!
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Walk softly and carry a big banjo...

""quid statis aspicientes in infernum"
SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
***
England England



« Reply #1026 on: May 23, 2020, 04:14:27 pm »

Hmmmm, see I was brought up in the early 60's, 2 eggs in a mug topped with full fat milk beaten with a fork, the milk makes it fluff up and makes it appear bigger and shoved between 2 slices of bread fills yer tummy.

Beef dripping on toast, covered with salt was another regular.

Raw bacon rind was considered a treat.

Then we found the first Vesta chow mein in the 70's. A monthly grand feast.

Welcome to the new world.........

Uuum, as for coffee, I'm an out of the jar, instant man myself, In France years ago I had the most intense coffee experience from the smallest of cups........... Strong to say the least.

« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 04:29:12 pm by SeVeNeVeS » Logged

Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #1027 on: May 23, 2020, 11:43:25 pm »

There are some people out there who can't even boil water, let alone an egg! And as for a nice omelette ....!

My dad taught all three of we kids how to cook basics, so at least we wouldn't starve while he was away working, and two of us took to to it like ducks to water, and even my older brother cooks for himself now, and keeps his little flat nice! Wasn't always the way. My younger brother is chef quality, and I'm a pretty good cook. The cooking gene is strong in my dad's side of the family - a bit like the force! And as for coffee ... has to be pretty good to pass the test!

And speaking of ... I just may go and make myself a cheese omelette for breakfast, and coffee!
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 11:57:58 pm by Banfili » Logged
Darkhound
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



« Reply #1028 on: May 24, 2020, 12:44:22 pm »

In my Junior High School (@12-14 year olds), every boy took a course called Domestic Survival. Grocery shopping, simple cooking, basic ssewing repairs for thick-fingered batchelors, etc. I have been grateful for this many times!
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"Stupidity is a curse with which even the Gods struggle in vain. Ignorance we can fix."
Sorontar
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia


All ideas should have wings


WWW
« Reply #1029 on: May 24, 2020, 01:12:51 pm »

In junior high school, we had to do a subject called home economics. The only numbers it discussed was how much flour in the recipe, how many calories per serving and how many wads of dough can you throw onto the ceiling when the teacher isn't watching.

What they should have been teaching us was how the taxation and electorial systems worked so we could fill out our own taxation reports and understand how to elect a politician (and minimise the chances of the rival getting elected). Both are skills that most Aussies have to use (by law). We have to pay tax and vote! Instead they thought they better focus on teaching us how to cook.

Sorontar
who also had to do typing, technical drawing, needlework, metalwork and woodwork, of which the needlework has been most beneficial over the years for costumes.
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Sorontar, Captain of 'The Aethereal Dancer'
Advisor to HM Engineers on matters aethereal, aeronautic and cosmographic
http://eyrie.sorontar.com
Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #1030 on: May 24, 2020, 01:49:14 pm »

When I hit high school Home Economics had just been dropped from the curriculum the year before, as had typing and commerce - three indispensable subjects that everyone should learn!(IMHO!)

I picked up typing in 1970, had already learned how to cook and budget, and did a Cert III in Public Administration a bit later on. The best subject in the Cert III was 'Government and the Public Service', which I think should be compulsory for every Australian public servant (civil servant for the UK) and every existing and aspiring politician. Brilliant subject altogether. I went to a convent school for girls only, so no metalwork or woodwork, which I would have loved, but I did carry art all the way through. Sewing was the alternative to art.
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Deimos
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #1031 on: May 24, 2020, 01:50:03 pm »

In the 70s (when I was in High School) neither shop nor Home Ec (as it was called) was required, nor was typing.
I took typing as an elective.
I learned woodworking and "handyman" type repairs and how to use hand and power tools from my dad, an electrical engineer by profession, but a tinkerer by choice. Learned cooking and sewing from my Mom, learned how to budget, balance a cheque book  and do my own taxes just from living with frugal parents.
Learned electronics in the military and how to fabricate stuff by watching the techs in the [aerospace] labs build prototypes.  
  
ALL OF IT has proven useful, and given me confidence in my ability to do something or learn something new.

"Whether you think you can do something, or think you can't, you're probably right."  
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Here is a test to find out if your mission in life is complete:
If you're alive, it isn't. -- Lauren Bacall

"You can tell a man's vices by his friends, his virtues by his enemies."

"Only the paranoid survive."
Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #1032 on: May 24, 2020, 10:15:33 pm »

In the 70s (when I was in High School) neither shop nor Home Ec (as it was called) was required, nor was typing.
I took typing as an elective.
I learned woodworking and "handyman" type repairs and how to use hand and power tools from my dad, an electrical engineer by profession, but a tinkerer by choice. Learned cooking and sewing from my Mom, learned how to budget, balance a cheque book  and do my own taxes just from living with frugal parents.
Learned electronics in the military and how to fabricate stuff by watching the techs in the [aerospace] labs build prototypes.  
  
ALL OF IT has proven useful, and given me confidence in my ability to do something or learn something new.

"Whether you think you can do something, or think you can't, you're probably right."  

My dad was a believer in learning and doing - and early 'lifelong learning' enthusiast. So, I learned to strip down and maintain a lawn mower, including changing the blades, basic maintenance on a car, changing a tyre, solder, basic timber repair and maintenance, put new glass in windows (in the days of putty!) and all those useful, practical things.

A family friend later taught me some electronics. Self-taught artist. More 'ladylike' activities such as hand sewing I picked up along the way, along with machine sewing, needlework in the form of embroidery and tapestry, and beadwork. Pottery and enamelling were also added a bit later on. What you might call 'a well-rounded education', which is still ongoing!

I have used all of it, and am still learning more skills - what better life can there be!
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J. Wilhelm
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United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #1033 on: November 24, 2020, 09:35:12 am »

Metallic monolith found in a desert in the State of Utah. Maybe the powers that be have decided humans need another evolutionary push.

CNN: Utah helicopter crew discovers mysterious metal monolith deep in the desert.
https://www.cnn.com/2020/11/23/us/utah-monolith-trnd/index.html
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von Corax
Squire of the Lambda Calculus
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
Canada Canada

Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #1034 on: November 24, 2020, 12:21:30 pm »

Metallic monolith found in a desert in the State of Utah. Maybe the powers that be have decided humans need another evolutionary push.

CNN: Utah helicopter crew discovers mysterious metal monolith deep in the desert.
https://www.cnn.com/2020/11/23/us/utah-monolith-trnd/index.html
Looks like an infestation of artists to me.
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By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
By the Beans of Life do my thoughts acquire speed
My hands acquire a shaking
The shaking becomes a warning
By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
The Leverkusen Institute of Paleocybernetics is 5838 km from Reading
von Corax
Squire of the Lambda Calculus
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
Canada Canada

Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #1035 on: December 21, 2020, 12:36:18 pm »

VOC-25 - A conceptual vocal synthesizer

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Mercury Wells
Rogue Ætherlord
*
I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #1036 on: January 07, 2021, 12:15:46 am »

[REDACTED].
« Last Edit: January 07, 2021, 12:17:35 am by Mercury Wells » Logged

Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

The Ministry of Tea respectfully advises you to drink one cup of tea day...for that +5 Moral Fibre stat.
SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
***
England England



« Reply #1037 on: January 07, 2021, 03:13:31 pm »

[REDACTED].
And so now everyone is wondering what was considered too extreme or not to forum rules.

Could it be.........?


[REDACTED].
 
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Rockula
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Nothing beats a good hat.


« Reply #1038 on: January 07, 2021, 04:04:14 pm »

[REDACTED].
And so now everyone is wondering what was considered too extreme or not to forum rules.

Could it be.........?


[REDACTED].
 

I reckon it was the [REDACTED] and the scenes of [REDACTED] at the [REDACTED]..
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The legs have fallen off my Victorian Lady...
Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #1039 on: January 07, 2021, 04:15:37 pm »

[REDACTED].
And so now everyone is wondering what was considered too extreme or not to forum rules.

Could it be.........?


[REDACTED].
 

I reckon it was the [REDACTED] and the scenes of [REDACTED] at the [REDACTED]..

Not to mention the [REDACTED] of the [REDACTED] about the [REDACTED] insomuch as it's relevant to the [REDACTED].

And to quote the eminent Mr Fry, 'behave or I shall have to whip it out and put my pencil through it'.
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I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."
Sir Henry
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Poking the i's and drinking the t's


« Reply #1040 on: January 07, 2021, 06:33:42 pm »

To be honest, I hadn't noticed anything being DACTED in the first place, let alone it happening again. But twice in one day? What times we live in!
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I speak in syllabubbles. They rise to the surface by the force of levity and pop out of my mouth unneeded and unheeded.
Cry "Have at!" and let's lick the togs of Waugh!
Arsed not for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for tea.
Mercury Wells
Rogue Ætherlord
*
I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #1041 on: January 08, 2021, 04:13:41 pm »

War of the words: HG Wells coin also features false quote.


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J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #1042 on: January 09, 2021, 03:17:25 am »

There are some people out there who can't even boil water, let alone an egg! And as for a nice omelette ....!

My dad taught all three of we kids how to cook basics, so at least we wouldn't starve while he was away working, and two of us took to to it like ducks to water, and even my older brother cooks for himself now, and keeps his little flat nice! Wasn't always the way. My younger brother is chef quality, and I'm a pretty good cook. The cooking gene is strong in my dad's side of the family - a bit like the force! And as for coffee ... has to be pretty good to pass the test!

And speaking of ... I just may go and make myself a cheese omelette for breakfast, and coffee!

I'm blessed the same way. I have no clue why I took to cooking. I blame it on the social life I had when raised by my grandparents. We were always inviting family, godparents and friends to dinner. We had Christmas and new year dinners of 10 to 20 people regularly. Birthday parties, first communions, and the like.Being raised in a Latin country is fantastic that way - it all revolves around food. My great grandmother was French and she passed an awful lot of tradition (and strange kitchen utensils, some of which I still have) to my mother
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
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United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #1043 on: January 09, 2021, 03:19:05 am »

[REDACTED].
And so now everyone is wondering what was considered too extreme or not to forum rules.

Could it be.........?


[REDACTED].
 

I reckon it was the [REDACTED] and the scenes of [REDACTED] at the [REDACTED]..

Not to mention the [REDACTED] of the [REDACTED] about the [REDACTED] insomuch as it's relevant to the [REDACTED].

And to quote the eminent Mr Fry, 'behave or I shall have to whip it out and put my pencil through it'.

That sounds very painful.
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Synistor 303
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #1044 on: January 09, 2021, 03:37:06 am »



I'm blessed the same way. I have no clue why I took to cooking. I blame it on the social life I had when raised by my grandparents. We were always inviting family, godparents and friends to dinner. We had Christmas and new year dinners of 10 to 20 people regularly. Birthday parties, first communions, and the like.Being raised in a Latin country is fantastic that way - it all revolves around food. My great grandmother was French and she passed an awful lot of tradition (and strange kitchen utensils, some of which I still have) to my mother
[/quote]

The strange kitchen utensils remind me of a time when my mother went to visit her sick mother and my dad decided to 'clean out the kitchen of all the things he never saw her use'. A lot of very useful and marvellous things were thrown out. This resulted in many loud words being spoken, and my mother threatening to go out to the shed and throw out all the tools she had never seen my father use...
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Deimos
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #1045 on: January 09, 2021, 05:20:46 am »

The strange kitchen utensils remind me of a time when my mother went to visit her sick mother and my dad decided to 'clean out the kitchen of all the things he never saw her use'. A lot of very useful and marvellous things were thrown out. This resulted in many loud words being spoken, and my mother threatening to go out to the shed and throw out all the tools she had never seen my father use...

I know of 2 or maybe three couples where the spouses have done that; i.e, got rid of something (or things) of the other's that the "cleaner outer" [arbitrarily] decided  his/her spouse "doesn't use".
 I think that if my spouse did that (I live alone, btw, so this is a hypothetical surmise) I would be enraged....might even consider getting divorced.
It is most definitely passive-aggressive behaviour of the partner doing the clean-out, and would lead me to wonder, in fact, to conclude that my spouse/partner  lacks the normal consideration one should feel for the other person (me) in the relationship.

Just thinking about it nearly sets me off.  Angry 
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SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
***
England England



« Reply #1046 on: January 12, 2021, 10:37:49 am »

I know a lot of members have been here longer, but I just realized  I've been here for 10 years.

Giddy gawd how time flies by................. WTF!  Shocked
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Sir Henry
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Poking the i's and drinking the t's


« Reply #1047 on: January 12, 2021, 11:38:24 am »


The strange kitchen utensils remind me of a time when my mother went to visit her sick mother and my dad decided to 'clean out the kitchen of all the things he never saw her use'. A lot of very useful and marvellous things were thrown out. This resulted in many loud words being spoken, and my mother threatening to go out to the shed and throw out all the tools she had never seen my father use...

A variation on that:
One summer, when I was a teenager, my uncle rented a French farmhouse for a fortnight and we all went to stay for a holiday. It was wonderfully rustic, and the kitchen had a collection of pots and pans that looked as if they had survived the Flood. A hundred or more years of patina, carefully built up over the generations. They were glorious.

My aunt, however, was of a different opinion. For the fortnight we were there she spent about an hour every morning with a metal scourer, scrubbing them until they shone. She was so proud.

The owner, when she arrived on the last day, was apoplectic! The rest of us just waited outside by the cars while they had a screaming argument in the kitchen in a frenzied mix of French and English for about an hour. My French vocabulary must have almost doubled in that time, but thankfully I have never since needed to use such language. In French or English.
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
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United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #1048 on: January 12, 2021, 09:29:32 pm »


The strange kitchen utensils remind me of a time when my mother went to visit her sick mother and my dad decided to 'clean out the kitchen of all the things he never saw her use'. A lot of very useful and marvellous things were thrown out. This resulted in many loud words being spoken, and my mother threatening to go out to the shed and throw out all the tools she had never seen my father use...

A variation on that:
One summer, when I was a teenager, my uncle rented a French farmhouse for a fortnight and we all went to stay for a holiday. It was wonderfully rustic, and the kitchen had a collection of pots and pans that looked as if they had survived the Flood. A hundred or more years of patina, carefully built up over the generations. They were glorious.

My aunt, however, was of a different opinion. For the fortnight we were there she spent about an hour every morning with a metal scourer, scrubbing them until they shone. She was so proud.

The owner, when she arrived on the last day, was apoplectic! The rest of us just waited outside by the cars while they had a screaming argument in the kitchen in a frenzied mix of French and English for about an hour. My French vocabulary must have almost doubled in that time, but thankfully I have never since needed to use such language. In French or English.

Trust me, you need a whole other vocabulary set when instead of pots and pans you're talking about cleaning a collectible French bottle of wine. That indeed happened to a distant family member. The only other time I heard such adjectives and not that I heard them personally, but rather my grandmother when she was a child, it was when my French great grand mother learned that the Germans had marched under the Arc de Triomphe on Paris during the invasion of France. According to my grandmother (they were living in an apartment in New York City at the time) she screamed for two hours while wielding a large butcher knife.
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E.J.MonCrieff
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #1049 on: January 18, 2021, 12:57:51 am »


Not the first time there's been a mistake on  one of our £2 coins...

I seem to recall that some time ago someone pointed out that the meshed cogs on the reverse of the coin wouldn't turn...

I got one in some change today, and, yes, it's true...  There are nineteen meshed cogs' so the array would be locked solid
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