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Author Topic: 11 Rarely Seen Moments Of Our History  (Read 1860 times)
chicar
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Student in Techno-Shamanism and Lyncanthrope

Chicar556
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« on: November 19, 2014, 12:47:47 am »

Warning, that in Ebausmworld , but that not the surreal stuff:
http://www.ebaumsworld.com/pictures/view/84359912/
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The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
jonb
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England England



« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2014, 04:38:38 pm »

I have been wondering where to put this little story in and this seems like a nice spot for amazing incidents.



This is the front cover from the Illustrated London News, for the parade held in London after the Zulu war. It shows King Cetshwayo kaMpande. Who was  paraded through London in the Victory Parade to celebrate the end of the Zulu war. This was the last time an enemy leader was ever paraded in a victory celebration in London.
Firstly I would like to draw your attention to the feathers. There is no photograph of Cetshwayo with feathers in his hair, and it would not have been part of his state dress. As such why were they added. This might be interesting in the conversations about steampunkers using indigenous costumes. It might well be that the illustrator of this picture put the feathers in to give his sitter a more 'native' look to emphasize the subject is not European, the otherness of Cetshwayo. But it could be that as feathered plumes were being used in European military hats of this period to denote rank, another explanation could be they were added to give some rank to the King.  So the use of feathers in steampunk dress could well be seen as fitting more to a Victorian European culture than anything else. Now lets look at the man himself.



We have a picture of Victorian Society, we might know there were 15 assassination attempts on Queen Victoria, and we know it was a hugely inequitable society, but we presume that although there might be a few agitators around the edge most people in Britain were very loyal to the crown. So it might surprise you that the London crowds cheered the king who's armies caused one of the biggest ever colonial defeats the British army ever suffered. It might also surprise you that the same crowd booed the British Generals and Officers. Think about that the British people, not immigrants to Britain, but indigenous British people booing their own army. Americans might think of the unpopularity of the Vietnam war, but is it not a whole different ball game when the population is not just against the war but actively applaud the Enemy?
This action of the London Crowds shook the establishment to the roots, and could well be why there has not been a parade of captured enemy leaders in London again.

Lastly as a side note Vincent van Gogh was in London at this time, hoping to either become a preacher, or an illustrator in London and watched the Parade, He was impressed by the spectacle and colour, and it is said that the hue of red he insisted on using in his paintings after that was the scarlet of those British army jackets on that day.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2014, 04:42:08 pm by jonb » Logged
Argus Fairbrass
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So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2014, 07:25:15 pm »

^^ superb post. I've actually been looking for a decent picture of Cetshwayo in that suit for years. I only have a tiny postage stamp sized one in an old book, so thanks for sharing. Yes that was an extraordinary event, particularly as certain history books will often intimate that British empire building was done as much to boost moral at home, as it was to expand interests abroad. Clearly it didn't always work as well as some would have us believe.
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Have her steamed and brought to my tent!
jonb
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« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2014, 01:48:47 am »

Thank you for saying that.
The great book on the Zulu wars is 'The washing of the Spears' by Donald R. Morris, in fact it is to my mind the best history book I have ever read, and I can't recommend it too highly! In that book is the argument I agree with that nobody wanted the war, but through cultural misunderstandings and the length of time messages took to go from London to the Cape and back the fools just walked into it.
I can't take credit for the picture I just whipped it off the net, and I noticed there are a few other slightly different poses taken at the same time, if you cant find them PM me and I will get all the links for you.

PS a good book about the Zulus is

My People: Writings of a Zulu Witchdoctor by  Vusumazulu Credo Mutwa. It is out of print now, but old copies can be found.
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VampirateMace
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Mein Hexapod


« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2014, 04:42:36 am »

I'm going to agree with the 'less European' theory for the feathers. This was the same culture that had 'parks', human zoos, where tribe's people lived in mock villages, so 'civilized' man could observe their culture.
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jonb
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England England



« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2014, 06:00:25 am »

I don't think the two are necessarily mutually exclusive. In America the use of feathers in head gear is associated with indigenous populations, but look back at Europe feathers in helmets and hats goes back to at least the Greeks.



Horse hair is used for the common troops plumes, but often for the top ranks feathers were used. And as in the example above eagles feathers for Kaiser Bill because of the association with Prussia and the Imperial Eagle. Now a Zulu king does not wear feathers, so were they put in by the artist to give the picture of Cetshwayo an idea of rank like a crown that could be recognised by a British audience? and then in such a way to look primitive?

We might even speculate, with stories of the wild west being popular in Britain at that time was the artist distorting Cetshawayo to look like Sitting Bull and making comparison of the Battle of the little Bighorn 1876 and the battle of Isandlwana 1879.

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VampirateMace
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Mein Hexapod


« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2014, 06:46:49 am »

Suppose that's a good point too.
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Vagabond GentleMan
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« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2014, 07:54:01 pm »

Thought-provoking posts, jonb!

You have me waxing philosophical on the implications and connotations of feathered headwear...for as you say, it is paradoxically both true (as you've said) that we Westerners tend to view it as something "primitive" people do, yet we've a long and glorious history of meaningfully doing it ourselves...feathered helms and hats from soldiers to hunters to fancy ladies...feathered headwear seems to have inherent meaning to us in spite of that meaning's ambiguity...would you care to elaborate?  I'm finding it quite fascinating... Smiley
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Well that wolf has a dimber bonebox, and he'll flash it all milky and red.  But you won't see our Red Jack's spit, nug, cuz he's pinked ya, and yer dead.
jonb
Snr. Officer
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England England



« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2014, 01:58:09 am »

I was looking at a link Mr Wilhelm made to blue corn, which the Hopi Indians used and in the link it talked about how many symbolic meanings it had for that tribe. That got me thinking nobody as far as I know from European culture has copied those Hopi symbols or at least they are not used in our cultures, probably because those symbols would not mean anything to us. So was the reason why the Plains Indian feathered headdress has become such a potent symbol for European and non-native American cultures that these cultures already understood to an extent the meaning of feathered headdresses. Whereas as these cultures have no familiarity with blue corn so would not understand blue corn symbolically.
So did Europeans copy indigenous American headdresses because they already knew about feathered crests like this for the Prince of Wales?


As an artist yourself V.G. you will know that if you wanted to say something in a picture you will not invent a symbol that nobody understands, but will use a symbol that already exists. You might be creative and use the symbol in a new way but if you are going to use a symbol in an image to say something you are going to use a symbol which the audience will already understand has a meaning. So if I wanted to show 'windy' I might think of this as a symbol

and not something new like this

which nobody would understand.

This is what most people with conspiracy theories do not understand, when they look at symbols for something new they cannot conceive why it is not a new symbol, but is derived from an older symbol. Why does the president of the USA have a symbol that is the same as a Babylonian King? Once we understand the Eagle is a symbol of power we are not going to invent a new symbol to mean power.

So how old are our symbols?


This image of death is 35-40 thousand years old.
A bull spilling its spiralling entrails, A broken spear, a man on his back, and a bird which nearly every culture understands to be a symbolic representation of the spirit.
Given evidence for some symbols goes back that far, we have to ask ourselves what belongs to who?
« Last Edit: December 02, 2014, 02:14:26 am by jonb » Logged
Mercury Wells
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I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2014, 09:52:44 pm »

For all we know, the wearing of feathers/shells et cetera could've be a result of a drunken dare.






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Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

The Ministry of Tea respectfully advises you to drink one cup of tea day...for that +5 Moral Fibre stat.
jonb
Snr. Officer
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England England



« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2014, 12:57:43 pm »

For all we know, the wearing of feathers/shells et cetera could've be a result of a drunken dare.









But is not that the sole driving force behind human history? Least-ways I know of no other coherent explanation for everything.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2014, 01:01:21 pm by jonb » Logged
jonb
Snr. Officer
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England England



« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2014, 02:09:51 pm »

Looking into Tiki style I came across this about;

Princes David Kahalepouli Kawanaankoa and Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole set a UK first when they went surfing in Bridlington, Yorkshire, of all places, in 1890



and the first woman to surf in Britain



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2127579/How-Hawaiian-princes-brought-surfing-Yorkshire-1890.html
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jonb
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #12 on: January 02, 2015, 01:00:01 pm »

I thought I should share this with you all, strictly it is of the dieselpunk era but . . .

It is a photograph of an event that took place in the 1930s from the Book 'African Drums' written by Richard St. Barbe Baker. The Author, Barbe Baker was the Assistant Conservator of forests in Kenya Colony and the Southern Provinces of Nigeria. Mr Barbe Baker got it into his head that the only way to get Africans to plant trees was to organise tree planting dances. An American friend of his who was visiting decided to dress up for the dance. This is the Photograph from the book of that event.


Sadly there are no pictures of the Cossack dancing that apparently everybody at the event tried.
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