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Author Topic: For the mathematicians.  (Read 770 times)
Rory B Esq BSc
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« on: August 06, 2014, 02:03:44 pm »

100 years ago WW1 started, it lasted 4 years.
In some sectors of the Western Front 1,000 artillery shells landed in every square meter.
Assuming an average caliber of 75mm and length of 250mm per shell how much of the 'red zone' would have enabled man to build a ladder to the moon had the iron been used for peaceful purposes instead?

A rather sobering thought!
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Atterton
Time Traveler
****

Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2014, 02:44:59 pm »

Nah, we should have used to make a giant cannon and travel to the Moon in a large projectile.
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Resurrectionist and freelance surgeon.
Fairley B. Strange
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Australia Australia


Relax, I've done much dumber things and survived..


WWW
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2014, 10:15:05 am »

Actually 75mm was about the lower limit for field artillery, not anywhere near the average size.

http://postalheritage.org.uk/uploads/Q_030040.jpg
http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/72397000/jpg/_72397046_154419800_10_getty_munitionsworker.jpg
http://www.halinaking.co.uk/Location/Yorkshire/Frames/History/1914%20World%20War%20I/Images/Munitions%20Factory.jpg

That's a lot more iron to add to the pile, but I'd second Atterton re melting it all into a Trans-Lunar cannon instead.

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