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Author Topic: Inspirations for Steampunk Costumes...Photo Gallary.  (Read 6126 times)
RJBowman
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« on: May 02, 2014, 03:48:35 pm »

This is not for photos of steampunk costumes. This is for vintage photos, or possibly photos of vintage clothing an equipment, that might inspire someone to make a costume.

Photos may be of people in dressed in specialized occupational gear, or wearing experimental equipment, or even wearing theatrical or fantasy costumes from a past era.

I will post a few examples to illustrate the idea and get the ball rolling.

First photo:


A very early radio-patrolman. (radio equipped policeman) Germany, circa 1925. The equipment is very distinctively of the early era of amplified sound; note the earphones and the "loudspeaker" horn. Even the aerial antenna evokes the era. And the police uniforms have that old military look.
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RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
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« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2014, 03:52:53 pm »

Now something very different:


Siberian Bear Hunting Armor.
A leather suit with nails to discourage mauling by large, dangerous animals. A few years ago an Alaskan inventor made the news with his bear-proof armor incorporating chain mail and heavy vulcanized rubber; the nineteenth century Russians adopted a different approach for a different purpose.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2014, 03:58:11 pm »

Something more fantastical:




L. Frank Baum's character "Tik-Tok" appeared in several books, but originated in a stage play. Rights to the Wizard of Oz characters were tied up in an earlier stage play, so Baum created characters that were essentually replacements for Dorothy and her companions. Tik-Tok, who in later illustrations had a roly-poly design, began his life as a Tin Woodsman imitator.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2014, 06:16:25 pm by RJBowman » Logged
RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
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« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2014, 04:01:40 pm »


An early directional listening device, “Professor Mayer’s topophone”, invented and patented by A. M. Mayer in 1879. Similar devices were used by plane spotters in the First World War, but were made obsolete by radar during WWII.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2014, 04:14:15 pm »

More fantasy:



You are probably familiar with Fritz Lang's Metropolis, but not as well known is this Soviet silent film from a few years earlier, Aelita, Queen of Mars. This was a lush production with a lot of costume images to be found on the internet; one site even has the costume designer's original drawings. Who would have thought that the Soviets would have produced something so whimsical and fun?
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Argus Fairbrass
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So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2014, 05:56:58 pm »

Now something very different:


Siberian Bear Hunting Armor.
A leather suit with nails to discourage mauling by large, dangerous animals. A few years ago an Alaskan inventor made the news with his bear-proof armor incorporating chain mail and heavy vulcanized rubber; the nineteenth century Russians adopted a different approach for a different purpose.


Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Don't wanna spam too much, but finally this is purely because sausage curls drive me crazy and I want to see more of 'em. So c'mon ladies, get the tongs out!

« Last Edit: May 02, 2014, 07:39:35 pm by Argus Fairbrass » Logged

Have her steamed and brought to my tent!
Drew P
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« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2014, 03:53:47 am »

She looks so happy.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2014, 06:25:32 am »

She looks so happy.

Actually more like stoned  Grin  Laudanum anyone?
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Argus Fairbrass
Rogue Ætherlord
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So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2014, 07:06:40 am »

Lol, poor kid probably had to sit for hours while they ragged her hair to oblivion, then longer when they made her pose for the photo. Spectacular end result but she does look like she'd rather be elsewhere.  Cheesy
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Herbert West
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Director of Preternatural Research, Arkam Museum


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« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2014, 08:11:15 am »

Want happy? I've got happy...



This cheerful fellow never fails to make me smile. Smiley

I'm also struck at how contemporary his jacket looks. It really isn't that different from something you'd find today (poor Steampunkers who can only afford to buy a suit from Goodwill, rejoice!)
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"I'm not a psychopath Anderson, I'm a high-functioning sociopath. Do your research!" ~Sherlock Holmes
Argus Fairbrass
Rogue Ætherlord
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England England


So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2014, 10:04:08 am »

Yes I'm rather hoping they're going to make a comeback. I'm sick of this short skinny suit fashion. I almost forgot as i think this thread is supposed to have a kind of zeerust angle. Behold, the radio pipe!



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RJBowman
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« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2014, 05:24:17 pm »


19th century French deep sea diving suit. It weighs 800 pounds, and has ball joints like modern deep sea suits. Circa 1882, designed by Alphonse and Théodore Carmagnolle, on display at the National Marine Museum in Paris.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2014, 08:07:43 pm by RJBowman » Logged
Herbert West
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Director of Preternatural Research, Arkam Museum


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« Reply #12 on: May 03, 2014, 06:02:26 pm »


19th century French deep sea diving suit. It weighs 800 pounds, and has ball joints like moders deep sea suits. Circa 1882, designed by Alphonse and Théodore Carmagnolle, on display at the National Marine Museum in Paris.


All thats missing is a little girl in a blue dress.
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RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
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« Reply #13 on: May 04, 2014, 10:25:58 pm »

Since I included photos from Aelita, I thought that I should include a photo of the maschinenmensch (machine-person) from Metropolis.


The robot shell was sculpted from Plastic Wood brand wood filler over a plaster cast of actress Brigitte Helm's body, and the actress wore the stiff, uncomfortable costume for the filming. It was the best and most recognizable piece of design work from the film, and inspired the design of C-3PO from Star Wars.

I have seen models, action figures, and full scale statues, but never a wearable costume; maybe some very skilled costume maker will take up the challenge.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #14 on: May 04, 2014, 11:13:33 pm »

I was looking for information about the Metropolis robot and found this:
http://www.walter-schulze-mittendorff.com/

Official website for Walter Schulze-Mittendorff, costume designer for Metropolis and other classic films. The page includes original design sketches.
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montysaurus
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« Reply #15 on: May 04, 2014, 11:26:07 pm »

http://www.therpf.com/f24/metropolis-robot-completed-aug-18-2011-a-52763/ Some made the Metropolis Robot
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RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
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« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2014, 01:52:18 am »

The guy has a Flicker page for his Maria project:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/25213497@N06/sets/72157605244330088/
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RJBowman
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« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2014, 06:34:03 pm »

Buck Rogers, as the character originally appeared in 1929:




The early Buck Rogers was a First World War veteran, and his costume was influenced by early aviation gear.

The fantastic machinery of the future had a very functional look in these early strips; lots of visible wire coils and gears. Flash Gordon would debut six years later and start a trend toward more stylish, design-oriented sci-fi illustration. Buck Rogers was certainly the more steampunk of the two heroes.

If you'd like to see how it might translate into a costume, check out this 12-inch-tall action figure:
http://www.mwctoys.com/REVIEW_091609a.htm
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
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« Reply #18 on: May 05, 2014, 07:00:53 pm »



Hand tinted frame from George Melies' "A Trip to the Moon". You can see the insect/skeleton details of the moon men in this picture.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #19 on: May 05, 2014, 07:06:12 pm »


George Melies sketch: "Les Selenites".
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RJBowman
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« Reply #20 on: May 05, 2014, 07:09:36 pm »


More Moon Men
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Argus Fairbrass
Rogue Ætherlord
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England England


So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #21 on: May 05, 2014, 10:39:38 pm »

A snazzy spacesuit from Czech cinematic effects pioneer Karel Zeman's Baron Prášil (English title Baron Munchausen). Obviously a huge influence on Terry Gilliam amongst others, and still criminally unknown by many. If you're unfamiliar with Mr Zemen's work I suggest you do yourself a favour and get acquainted forthwith.



THE MAGIC WORLD OF KAREL ZEMAN - short documentary - part 1


THE MAGIC WORLD OF KAREL ZEMAN - short documentary - part 2
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ColeV
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« Reply #22 on: May 06, 2014, 03:47:59 am »



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RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
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« Reply #23 on: May 08, 2014, 05:29:36 pm »

A reminder that not everything was brown and tan; the earliest known color film:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1V0Vc5iRoLY


This process, developed by Edward Turner, filmed frames through a sequence of color frames. Playback of the film at the time failed to produce a true impression of color, but through modern digital processing the true colors were reassembled to produce the above-linked video.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2014, 04:25:30 am by RJBowman » Logged
RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
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« Reply #24 on: May 08, 2014, 05:40:57 pm »


https://www.google.com/patents/US420179?dq=Nicholas+yagn&hl=en&sa=X&ei=gLFrU4_5JoPIsASxhoKABA&ved=0CEAQ6AEwAQ
Apparatus for assisting walking patented in 1890 by Nicholas Yagn. This is the predecessor to strength enhancing "exoskeleton" suits developed by General Electric, DARPA, Tony Stark, and others. I can find no photos of Yagn's apparatus, so it is possible that the device was patented but never built.
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