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Author Topic: Jobs that don't exist anymore... but maybe should.  (Read 6008 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #75 on: April 30, 2014, 05:07:56 pm »

Have we touched on automaton makers?  Or is that considered to esoteric and perhaps even still a viable duty of a clockmaker?
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RJBowman
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« Reply #76 on: April 30, 2014, 10:30:18 pm »

Have we touched on automaton makers?  Or is that considered to esoteric and perhaps even still a viable duty of a clockmaker?

Robotocists are the descendants of automaton makers. These are the guys that program or design and build robots primarily for industrial use.
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pakled05
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« Reply #77 on: May 03, 2014, 03:08:00 am »

y'know, no one seems to have brought up the fabled 'buggy whip manufacturers'...have they? a rough trade to be sure...Wink
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rovingjack
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« Reply #78 on: May 03, 2014, 03:41:17 am »

y'know, no one seems to have brought up the fabled 'buggy whip manufacturers'...have they? a rough trade to be sure...Wink

Based on a conversation I had with a coworker some years back where he recounted how he broke into a new market in his leather working part time crafting. A costumer requested he make a saddle for the customers wife, so he asked what kind of riding she did... "She doesn't ride." was the reply. They had this exchange a few times before it dawned on him what was being said.

So I'd wager there is still some fair income to be made in the buggy whip making trade, if you know the right people.
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« Reply #79 on: May 04, 2014, 10:30:38 am »

Excelsior Maker.  There used to be Excelsior Factories in forested states like New England making shredded wood stuffing for all kinds of uses which are now taken over by foam shapes and pellets and bubble wrap.  Save the trees!

Unless you are an excelsior maker, in which case it would be, "Shave the trees!"
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RJBowman
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« Reply #80 on: May 05, 2014, 04:08:50 am »

I thought that excelsior stuffing was a by-product of lumber and furniture manufacture.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #81 on: May 07, 2014, 05:50:52 am »

 Gender specific job  - wet nurse.  Men need not apply
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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #82 on: May 07, 2014, 09:44:49 am »

The job of "Pox doctor's clerk" and the profession of "Pox doctor" probably still exist, but the titles have probably evolved over the years.

Around the 1930s to 1950s, they would have been an "Assistant to Doctor of Venereal Disease" and "Doctor of Venereal Disease", Abbreviated to "VD Dr's Asst." and "VD Dr" sometime in the 1960s.

No doubt the modern NHS would relabel them "Sexually Tramissible Infection Auxiliary Clinical Technician" and "Sexually Tramissible Infection Medical Consulting Specialist".
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George Salt
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« Reply #83 on: May 07, 2014, 11:35:01 am »

The job of "Pox doctor's clerk" and the profession of "Pox doctor" probably still exist, but the titles have probably evolved over the years.

Around the 1930s to 1950s, they would have been an "Assistant to Doctor of Venereal Disease" and "Doctor of Venereal Disease", Abbreviated to "VD Dr's Asst." and "VD Dr" sometime in the 1960s.

No doubt the modern NHS would relabel them "Sexually Tramissible Infection Auxiliary Clinical Technician" and "Sexually Tramissible Infection Medical Consulting Specialist".


No, it's the GUM clinic (genitourinary medicine) and it would be a GUM doctor or GUM nurse.  The NHS has a page on careers in this speciality (link).

Not even the modern NHS is so politically correct as to spell anything as "Tramissable".. Wink
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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #84 on: May 07, 2014, 12:12:20 pm »

The job of "Pox doctor's clerk" and the profession of "Pox doctor" probably still exist, but the titles have probably evolved over the years.

Around the 1930s to 1950s, they would have been an "Assistant to Doctor of Venereal Disease" and "Doctor of Venereal Disease", Abbreviated to "VD Dr's Asst." and "VD Dr" sometime in the 1960s.

No doubt the modern NHS would relabel them "Sexually Tramissible Infection Auxiliary Clinical Technician" and "Sexually Tramissible Infection Medical Consulting Specialist".


No, it's the GUM clinic (genitourinary medicine) and it would be a GUM doctor or GUM nurse.  The NHS has a page on careers in this speciality (link).

Not even the modern NHS is so politically correct as to spell anything as "Tramissable".. Wink



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Arabella Periscope
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« Reply #85 on: May 08, 2014, 12:54:33 am »

Shave the trees, indeed, von Corax!  I hope excelsior was a byproduct.  One of its uses was for 'feminine products,' so from that point of view I am glad it is obsolete as a job -creating industry.
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rovingjack
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« Reply #86 on: May 08, 2014, 02:16:31 am »

Gender specific job  - wet nurse.  Men need not apply


don't be so sure: http://www.momlogic.com/2009/08/men_who_breastfeed.php
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #87 on: May 18, 2014, 09:06:09 pm »

Knocker-Uppers & Pure Collectors
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« Reply #88 on: May 19, 2014, 01:11:14 am »

My Dears,
From the days of Ancient Rome until quite recently, light-bearers had to accompany travellers after dark. A Strange Law (http://www.vincelewis.net/law.html) dictates that even cars should be heralded: "If a self-propelled carriage is driven on the Queens highway (any road) then a man must walk four miles in front of it waving a red flag (by day) and a red lantern by night."
Question: If four miles ahead, when does the man with the flag know if the vehicle has stopped? He could go on indefinitely!
C.W.
P.S. There was also a job which involved rapping the heads of sleepers during a sermon.
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« Reply #89 on: May 19, 2014, 01:53:23 am »

My Dears,
From the days of Ancient Rome until quite recently, light-bearers had to accompany travellers after dark. A Strange Law (http://www.vincelewis.net/law.html) dictates that even cars should be heralded: "If a self-propelled carriage is driven on the Queens highway (any road) then a man must walk four miles in front of it waving a red flag (by day) and a red lantern by night."
Question: If four miles ahead, when does the man with the flag know if the vehicle has stopped? He could go on indefinitely!


One of many laws passed in an futile attempt to stop the adoption of cars.
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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #90 on: May 19, 2014, 08:24:45 am »

My Dears,
From the days of Ancient Rome until quite recently, light-bearers had to accompany travellers after dark. A Strange Law (http://www.vincelewis.net/law.html) dictates that even cars should be heralded: "If a self-propelled carriage is driven on the Queens highway (any road) then a man must walk four miles in front of it waving a red flag (by day) and a red lantern by night."
Question: If four miles ahead, when does the man with the flag know if the vehicle has stopped? He could go on indefinitely!
C.W.
P.S. There was also a job which involved rapping the heads of sleepers during a sermon.


Except that the erudite Mr Lewis is wrong. The Locomotive Acts required the man with the red flag to be "not less than sixty yards" ahead of the vehicle.

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Camellia Wingnut
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Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #91 on: May 19, 2014, 10:16:50 am »

My Dear Mr. Beef,
Such a relief! I pictured the poor fellow ending up at John O'Groats and looking around, waiting for a vehicle that never came.
C.W.
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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #92 on: May 19, 2014, 11:37:02 am »

My Dear Mr. Beef,
Such a relief! I pictured the poor fellow ending up at John O'Groats and looking around, waiting for a vehicle that never came.
C.W.


After further research, Mr Lewis's assertion seems even more flawed. He insists that "a self-propelled carriage" must be preceded by a man with a red flag and that this statute is still in force. In fact this requirement in section three the Locomotive Act of 1865 was intended to apply to road-going steam engines, commonly known as traction-engines or locomobiles.

According to the article in the Fount of All Knowledge this section was repealed as part of the Highways and Locomotives (Amendment) Act of 1878. And yet the same Fount recounts an example of a man being fined for not meeting the red flag requirement more than fifteen years later.

Quote
"In the same year, 1895, I made my little petrol car to carry two (one besides the driver). It weighed a little under 5 cwt., but the engine did not develop much more than 1 h.p. It was fairly successful, but it brought me into the clutches of the law, and both my man, who was driving at the time, and myself were fined 2s. 6d. and costs for driving a locomotive (in legal phraseology a traction engine) without a licence and without a red flag!"


The chap was unlucky, as the red flag requirement was definitively repealed in the Locomotives on Highways Act of 1896.
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pakled05
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« Reply #93 on: May 19, 2014, 04:54:40 pm »

Locomotives on highways?...Now there's 'the road less traveled'...Wink

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Athanor
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« Reply #94 on: May 20, 2014, 06:41:59 am »

One job that existed until about the 1960s but no longer does is "knocker-up".

This doesn't mean what some of you might think it means; it was a first job for a young boy employed at a railway locomotive depot. He was issued with a long wooden pole and his job was to go to the houses of loco drivers and firemen an hour or so before their shifts were due to start, and tap with his pole on their bedroom windows to wake them up.

The job became obsolete when telephones came into general use.

Athanor.
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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #95 on: May 20, 2014, 08:30:28 am »

One job that existed until about the 1960s but no longer does is "knocker-up".

This doesn't mean what some of you might think it means; it was a first job for a young boy employed at a railway locomotive depot. He was issued with a long wooden pole and his job was to go to the houses of loco drivers and firemen an hour or so before their shifts were due to start, and tap with his pole on their bedroom windows to wake them up.

The job became obsolete when telephones came into general use.

Athanor.

I didn't think that knockers-up (or knocker-uppers) would have been around until as late as the 1960s. I had thought that they would have disappeared as alarm clocks became affordable for the working classes.

But for the railway engine drivers, I can see the point of going round to knock up a replacement driver when the scheduled one is unable work his shift through illness or injury.
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George Salt
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« Reply #96 on: May 20, 2014, 10:28:25 am »

I can't find the 1865 act (it may not have been added to the digital archives yet), but the Locomotive Act 1861 and the Highways and Locomotives (Amendment) Act 1878 are available online (as is all current and much historic UK legislation).

Interestingly, section 7 of the 1861 Act "Damage caused by locomotives to bridges to be made good by owners" was only repealed by the Statute Law (Repeals) Act 2004.
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #97 on: May 20, 2014, 05:10:44 pm »

Dog Muck collector (Pure collecting), as it was used in the leather industry (tanning).
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