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Author Topic: Jobs that don't exist anymore... but maybe should.  (Read 6024 times)
pakled05
Officer
***
United States United States



« Reply #50 on: April 19, 2014, 07:08:41 pm »

...and all we'd need beyond that would be a flint-knapper, and someone with a cart saying 'Bring out yer dead...Wink'
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #51 on: April 19, 2014, 07:14:04 pm »

I'd not heard the term gong farmer before.  Seems to be an Elizabethan (16th century) term.  In Victorian times this would be a night soil collector.  There are various business cards on-line from these people.

I believe that in some parts of India this job is still being done by hand by certain castes.
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Will Howard
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



« Reply #52 on: April 19, 2014, 08:19:20 pm »

...and all we'd need beyond that would be a flint-knapper, and someone with a cart saying 'Bring out yer dead...Wink'


Flint knappers still exist, making gunflints for reproduction muskets as well as arrowheads.
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"I'm a Barbarian by choice, not ancestry..."
Keith_Beef
Snr. Officer
****
France France


« Reply #53 on: April 19, 2014, 09:22:38 pm »



Crossing-sweeper -- the lads who swept up after the horses in the days of horse-drawn conveyances.... not really a bad job, and good for the gardens they doubtless sold to.  But then sweeping is something I enjoy doing, about the only kind of housework that seems satisfying.


An even older- but related- job is the "gong farmer".  This individual would empty cess pits & latrines & use or sell the resulting "product" as fertilizer.


In England, there used to be the Night Soil Man, who would go around emptying earth closets in the days before there were water closets.

Around Paris, I was told, the human waste used to be carted off to Chambourcy where it was spread in the cherry orchards. I've not been able to find any corroboration for the story, though.
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--
Keith
Will Howard
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



« Reply #54 on: April 20, 2014, 01:30:19 am »

I'd not heard the term gong farmer before.  Seems to be an Elizabethan (16th century) term.  

Actually the term is earlier- "gong" refers to a privy or its contents, & dates to the 11th century.  But the job I described is Tudor, as you surmised.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2014, 01:34:42 am by Will Howard » Logged
Kryss LaBryn
Snr. Officer
****
Canada Canada


aka Lady Amelia Cottington


« Reply #55 on: April 20, 2014, 06:03:35 pm »

Dowsers? Someone who uses a sticklike device to find water...

In the various rural areas of BC I have lived in, "witchers" who would come out and dowse for your well was still a fairly regular thing; my Dad hired one to help find the septic field shortly after we moved into my childhood home, and we had two out--in 2003 and 2005--to help find good locations for our well.

The one my Dad hired did a good job; the two we hired in the Interior were both crap. We eventually sunk a very productive well by locating it where our horticultural friend suggested (look for alder trees; they need actual water and their root systems only go down 40-60 feet; the reason you see them in lines so often is because they are following underground water courses) backed up by the experience of our driller (you want to take samples of what you are digging through every 10' of depth or so; you should be seeing different layers/colours/textures. The water runs between the layers; if you're drilling and it's all the same stuff all the way down you won't get anything. If you've nothing but pines around as well--they can survive strictly on rainfall and don't require below-ground water--then you won't find water).

Those two bits of advice, to look for alders and layers, cost us over $10,000 to obtain, so make good use of it *Grin*. Both witchers in the Interior did come very highly recommended, though; most people there would not risk the expense of drilling a well without bringing one in to find the best location first.

Quote
Heck, I'd be happy if live tech support doesn't disappear...Wink

If it's any consolation, I work live tech support and the business seems to be thriving. Pretty sure that as long as electronics are a thing, live tech support will also be a thing, if only for that 10% of problems a reboot doesn't fix (and those people who haven't heard "Have you tried restarting it?" yet, ha ha).
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"Be clean and courteous; raise your hat, And wipe your boots upon the mat: Such proofs of gentlemanly feeling Are to the ladies most appealing." The Professor's Manuscript - Dorothy L. Sayers
Camellia Wingnut
Snr. Officer
****
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands


Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #56 on: April 20, 2014, 08:48:17 pm »

My Dears,
Both flint-knappers and dowsers still work in Wiltshire. Also, in loads of flint used for roads you can find knapped flint tools from the distant past mixed in. And I once watched a demonstration of stone-axe flaking for which I suppose the artisan was paid.
C.W.
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Take my camel, dear, said my aunt Camellia, climbing down from that animal on her return from high mass. The camel, a white Arabian Dhalur (single hump) from the famous herd of the Ruola tribe, had been a parting present, its saddle-bags stuffed with low-carat [sic] gold and flashy orient gems, from a rich desert tycoon. . . .
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #57 on: April 20, 2014, 09:02:02 pm »

spinsters -

"Spinning

    According to the Spinsters Treadle website, the word "spinster" used to mean a person who spun cotton, wool or flax into yarn. This process was extremely time-consuming and women with children did not have time to create fine, high-quality yarn. This process was usually left to single females. Spinsters were usually unmarried women, which is the genesis of the current definition of spinster. Girls from age 6 to 9 also typically worked at this trade and were paid low wages. "

 here are some snippets from a BBC History site -  come join me and pull up  your Soap Boxes Ladies

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/victorians/womens_work_01.shtml

"As the mid-Victorian boom got underway the demand for female and juvenile labour expanded, particularly where new technologies or patterns of work were resented by skilled men. "


"Sometimes it was illegal (as with prostitution) or performed in unregulated sweatshops (a further reason for failure to record). Women may have also have preferred to keep their income-earning a secret from their husband. An occupational designation, for whatever reason, meant something very different for men than for women. With the emphasis primarily upon their role as wives and mothers, women workers did not usually see their occupation as a centrally defining characteristic of their lives, and therefore frequently failed to declare it. "


"Women were prominent in many sectors which underwent considerable technological and organisational change partly because employers at first found it easier to recruit women and juveniles to new practices in the face of opposition from established, unionised or skilled adult male workers. "

" Some new technologies were adapted and modified with young female workers in mind, while the cheap labour of women and children could also hold back mechanisation in favour of traditional labour intensive methods. "


« Last Edit: April 21, 2014, 09:40:27 am by Hurricane Annie » Logged
Will Howard
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



« Reply #58 on: April 20, 2014, 10:39:56 pm »

spinsters -

"Spinning

    According to the Spinsters Treadle website, the word "spinster" used to mean a person who spun cotton, wool or flax into yarn. This process was extremely time-consuming and women with children did not have time to create fine, high-quality yarn. This process was usually left to single females. Spinsters were usually unmarried women, which is the genesis of the current definition of spinster.

The suffix "ster" indicates a female worker.  A "spinner" was male, a "spinster", female.  Likewise, a "brewer" was a man who brewed ale or beer, while a "brewster" was a woman with the same job.  For sewing, men were elevated to "tailor" while a woman was a "seamstress".  Thus, a job description described the job AND delineated the gender of the worker. 






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frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #59 on: April 23, 2014, 07:06:23 pm »

oakum picker

Oakum is a preparation of tarred fiber used in shipbuilding, for caulking or packing the joints of timbers in wooden vessels and the deck planking of iron and steel ships, as well as cast iron pipe plumbing applications. Oakum was at one time recycled from old tarry ropes and cordage, which were painstakingly unraveled and taken apart into fiber; this task of picking and preparation was a common penal occupation in prisons and workhouses. (from wiki)
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Keith_Beef
Snr. Officer
****
France France


« Reply #60 on: April 23, 2014, 09:37:08 pm »

oakum picker


"Il n'y a plus de calfats, il n'y a plus de calfats"
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Camellia Wingnut
Snr. Officer
****
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands


Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #61 on: April 24, 2014, 10:52:29 pm »

N.B. So I could be a caulkster?
C.W.
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Will Howard
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



« Reply #62 on: April 24, 2014, 11:03:54 pm »

N.B. So I could be a caulkster?
C.W.

or a prankster (I guess a male would be a pranker).
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Camellia Wingnut
Snr. Officer
****
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands


Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #63 on: April 24, 2014, 11:20:42 pm »

Oh, yes. And I could be a gangster! Sawn-off parasols. What a picture that would make!
C.W.
P.S. How about being a Pioneer Nose-Shaping Specialist?
Or, I could be a gangster with a sawn-off parasol who will offer to reshape your nose for free!
« Last Edit: April 24, 2014, 11:29:08 pm by Camellia Wingnut » Logged
Arabella Periscope
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Edwardian summer


« Reply #64 on: April 25, 2014, 12:00:26 am »

Excelsior Maker.  There used to be Excelsior Factories in forested states like New England making shredded wood stuffing for all kinds of uses which are now taken over by foam shapes and pellets and bubble wrap.  Save the trees!
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Kenneth: 'If you're so hot, you can tell me how to say she has ideas above her station.'
Brian:'Oh yes, I forgot. It's fairly easy, old boy.
Elle a des idees au-dessus de sa gare.'
Kenneth: 'Idiot.  It's not that kind of station.'

Terence Rattigan 'French Without Tears.'
Will Howard
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



« Reply #65 on: April 25, 2014, 04:04:06 am »

Oh, yes. And I could be a gangster! Sawn-off parasols. What a picture that would make!
C.W.
P.S. How about being a Pioneer Nose-Shaping Specialist?
Or, I could be a gangster with a sawn-off parasol who will offer to reshape your nose for free!



A nose shapester?  (by the way, I guess "gangster" is the exception to the rule- not a gender-based word).
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Fairley B. Strange
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Australia Australia


Relax, I've done much dumber things and survived..


WWW
« Reply #66 on: April 26, 2014, 02:17:45 am »

Ms Wingnut,
                 Etymologically, if a lady who spins is a spinster, then the male equivalent would logically be a spinner.
A man who leads a work-gang is the Ganger, so a female head of such a group would be your Gangster.

However, this is assuming that the gang involved is a work-gang, if it is some other form of group activity being the female focus of a gang activity may have certain unusual connotations.

Yrs,
     F.B.S

« Last Edit: April 26, 2014, 03:26:23 am by Fairley B. Strange » Logged

Choose a code to live by, die by it if you have to.
Camellia Wingnut
Snr. Officer
****
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands


Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #67 on: April 26, 2014, 09:14:23 am »

Mr. Strange,
Indeed; hence the need for a sawn-off parasol. And what if I were a mobster? Do you think that is why Great-Aunts wear mob-caps?
Cordially,
C.W.
P.S. I now find that 'mob' means (feminine) 'mab' or 'slut', which is a profession certainly still extant, and one for which Great-Aunts do not qualify. They would, however, make exceedingly dangerous gangsters.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2014, 09:17:19 pm by Camellia Wingnut » Logged
Rory B Esq BSc
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #68 on: April 26, 2014, 08:38:46 pm »

Resurrection man...Night work, must have own shovel.
Pay on 'piece rate' 1 guinea per delivery.
(probably now called 'anatomical recovery engineer').


                                                                                                                   
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Camellia Wingnut
Snr. Officer
****
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands


Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #69 on: April 26, 2014, 09:22:28 pm »

My Dear Sir,
If only one were sure that this job no longer existed! One drawback, if you are tempted; consider what happens when your employment is "terminated." You would be "let go" from a scaffold. . . .
C.W.
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Maets
Immortal
**
United States United States

Gravatar

Airship Builder


WWW
« Reply #70 on: April 28, 2014, 02:30:35 am »

Americas Most Common and Least Common Jobs

http://247wallst.com/special-report/2014/04/24/americas-most-and-least-common-jobs/2/
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Arabella Periscope
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Edwardian summer


« Reply #71 on: April 28, 2014, 08:30:10 am »

There is a clock-winder at Windsor Castle who winds the 400 clocks and then starts again at the first clock.
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George Salt
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #72 on: April 28, 2014, 12:35:27 pm »

There are a number of office roles/titles that the nineteenth and twenty-first century office would both recognise by name, but perhaps not by function..

- The Victorian secretary is today's executive assistant.
- The Victorian computer was a man that is today replaced by a machine.
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Rory B Esq BSc
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #73 on: April 29, 2014, 07:37:18 pm »

One you won't see now in 'situations vacant' is 'General Skivvy', although many employers seem to desire them.
Others include 'Scullery maid', 'slave' (plantation or household), fishwife and so on, Now they're called other things to make them sound more attractive.
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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #74 on: April 29, 2014, 08:32:56 pm »

One you won't see now in 'situations vacant' is 'General Skivvy', although many employers seem to desire them.
Others include 'Scullery maid', 'slave' (plantation or household), fishwife and so on, Now they're called other things to make them sound more attractive.

A 'slave' is these days in the professional world called "an intern" (although it comes minus the food and accommodation.
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I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."
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