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Author Topic: Jobs that don't exist anymore... but maybe should.  (Read 6023 times)
rovingjack
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States


https://youtube.com/c/RovingJack


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« on: April 12, 2014, 06:22:40 am »

http://imgur.com/a/S3lOX

bowling pin setter

Knocker-upper/ door to door wake up service.

ice cutters

pre radar plane listeners

rat catchers

lamp lighters

milk men

log drivers

switch board operator

resurrectionist

lectors


I would totally be a lector, and totally wouldn't mind a human switch board operator, and who doesn't want lamp lighters back.
We actually could get milk delivered here, but I can't drink it and the guy I share this floor with is lactose intolerant. And sending logs by river is probably a more ecologically sound idea than using petrol guzzling trucks. I'd also had the idea some time ago that making a modern day Ice house just made sense for this region. we have winters enough to freeze tap water into blocks of ice that could make a great enough supply to last year round with modern insulation techniques.
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When an explosion explodes hard enough, the dust wakes up and thinks about itself.
Alexis Voltaire
Rogue Ætherlord
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United States United States


Shàlle We Dànce?


« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2014, 07:57:32 am »

Fire lookouts.

Where I grew up, the land was very mountainous and 90% forest, and about half of that was uninhabited national forest. The forest service, IIRC, used to have people manning lookout towers during the dry months to spot smoke after thunderstorms and such. These towers were generally on the top of the highest peak in a given area, in places that were sparsely populated and wouldn't usually have anyone around to see a fire if it started.

When my family was traveling around the backwoods several years ago, we happened across the last manned lookout tower in the county, and got invited up into it by the lady working there. The tower was basically a 14 x 14 one room shack with living quarters and windows that gave a 360 view for 50 miles in any direction. In the center of the tower was a pedestal with a manual rangefinder over a map of the surrounding area, which the spotter could use to find the approximate location of any smoke trails they saw.

This is all done by satellite nowdays, and I think the tower is at a local fairground now.
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FenrisWolf
Officer
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



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« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2014, 08:18:44 am »

Some of these still exist, well two of them anyway... rat catchers and milk men.

I know the rat catchers, a father and son team. They still use Jack Russell's for catching/killing the rats on farms and they also use Ferrets for rabbit trapping.
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Fenris Wolf
Iconographic Capturer of Ætheric Personalities™
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Keith_Beef
Snr. Officer
****
France France


« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2014, 10:10:48 am »

Some of these still exist, well two of them anyway... rat catchers and milk men.

I know the rat catchers, a father and son team. They still use Jack Russell's for catching/killing the rats on farms and they also use Ferrets for rabbit trapping.


Rat catchers are now "pest and vermin controllers"… they tend not to use dogs, tongs, buckets of water or rifles; they set traps and poison and they clear up the dead animals a couple of days later.

Milk men are still widespread in the UK, though for a number of years they've taken to delivering more than just milk and cream; my mum can get orange juice, bread and potatoes from hers. They apparently still exist in some parts of the US, too, at least there are some in New Jersey.

When I was a small boy, there was one permanently lit gas lamp at the top of the hill, all the others in the town had been electrified long before, probably in the 1940s or 1950s. This lamp, we were told, was burning off excess gas from the sewers. Apparently there were loads of these in Sheffield.
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Keith
SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
***
England England



« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2014, 10:31:02 am »

I remember when I was a kid a man knocking on the door offering to sharpen knives for a small fee.

On his push bike was a treadle operated grind wheel.

Proper rag n bone men, not some gypo trying to grab ya scrap metal.

~SeVeN~
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MWBailey
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United States United States


"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2014, 11:30:30 am »

Ditch Digger - I mean the one man with a shovel thing, not the five men standing around a backhoe and drinking coffee thing.

Stump Blaster - person or team that blows stumps out of the ground with either powder or dynamite or both. Quick and easy, if slightly loud and dangerous. Anyone who's tried to use a stump-grinding service will understand the need for a Stump Blaster.

Dog Walker - Scratch that, I live three doors down from one. Sorry.
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Walk softly and carry a big banjo...

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George Salt
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2014, 03:59:55 pm »

I remember when I was a kid a man knocking on the door offering to sharpen knives for a small fee.

On his push bike was a treadle operated grind wheel.

Proper rag n bone men, not some gypo trying to grab ya scrap metal.

Still get both of those round here, although the knife grinder uses an estate car rather than his bike (and I hope he comes around again soon, I've a few things need sharpening) and the rag'n'bone man now shouts using a megaphone from his transit tipper rather than a horse cart.

I can remember the rag'n'bone man with his horse and cart from when we'd visit my grandparents in Bradford during the early-'80s.
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Keith_Beef
Snr. Officer
****
France France


« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2014, 04:22:44 pm »

I remember when I was a kid a man knocking on the door offering to sharpen knives for a small fee.

On his push bike was a treadle operated grind wheel.

Proper rag n bone men, not some gypo trying to grab ya scrap metal.

~SeVeN~

I've seen knife grinders in France, but never in England. I remember the rag and bone man coming round with his horse drawn cart, shouting in a very nasal voice something that sounded like "ack bo, ack bo". He sounded a lot like the evening newspaper sellers in the streets shouting "onny" ("Chronny", for "Chronicle") in Newcastle and "ay'ar" (for "Late Star", i.e. the last very evening edition  of the "Star") in Sheffield.

Another that I remember from France is the barrel-organ player, who used to come into the apartment building yard and play his music. He didn't have a monkey, so he had to hope people would throw money close enough to him that he could scoop it all up quickly.
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Boxofbits
Deck Hand
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2014, 04:59:31 pm »

Fire lookouts.

During WW2 my Grandad was a fire lookout, stationed in a tiny room in the middle of the cross on top of the dome of St Paul's Cathedral. London He was a proper Victorian, would have made a great SP'er. I still have some of his tools etc.
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2014, 06:37:30 pm »

Brewers dray drover (not sure of the correct name.  But the chaps who delivered barrels of beer to local pubs using a 2-horse-drawn wagon.  There used to be a couple of breweries in London that delivered this way up until fairly recently.)
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Mr. Boltneck
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #10 on: April 12, 2014, 07:26:05 pm »

There is a knife-sharpener who works around here. He has a regular gig at one of the local markets, up in Mountain View. A fairly elderly man with a low-speed wet-abrasive setup, and what appear to be very steady hands. A lot of Silicon Valley foodies appreciate having properly-sharpened knives, I guess.
I can remember totters with carts in Islington at the start of the 1970s, and I remember seeing a horse-drawn brewer's dray on Baker Street one morning in 1980.
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Keith_Beef
Snr. Officer
****
France France


« Reply #11 on: April 12, 2014, 07:30:36 pm »

Fire lookouts.


During WW2 my Grandad was a fire lookout, stationed in a tiny room in the middle of the cross on top of the dome of St Paul's Cathedral. London He was a proper Victorian, would have made a great SP'er. I still have some of his tools etc.


Mine was on fire watch duty, too. In a reserved occupation (making crankshafts for Merlin engines at Shardlow's), and almost blind in one eye, so when he tried to sign up he was refused…

I was very young when he died, so I heard about this from my grandmother and mother; part of his job was supposedly to walk around on the roof making sure that there were fire buckets full of sand in case an incendiary bomb landed on the roof. I'm not sure what good a bucket of sand would have been against an incendiary bomb, though.

A couple of breweries had drays when I was in my teens; I think Vaux in Sunderland kept one until the early eighties, and Tetley in Leeds had a dray until 2006.

But how about this for a unique job: elephant drover.

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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
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09madasafish
« Reply #12 on: April 12, 2014, 07:55:40 pm »

Fire lookouts.


During WW2 my Grandad was a fire lookout, stationed in a tiny room in the middle of the cross on top of the dome of St Paul's Cathedral. London He was a proper Victorian, would have made a great SP'er. I still have some of his tools etc.


Mine was on fire watch duty, too. In a reserved occupation (making crankshafts for Merlin engines at Shardlow's), and almost blind in one eye, so when he tried to sign up he was refused…

I was very young when he died, so I heard about this from my grandmother and mother; part of his job was supposedly to walk around on the roof making sure that there were fire buckets full of sand in case an incendiary bomb landed on the roof. I'm not sure what good a bucket of sand would have been against an incendiary bomb, though.

A couple of breweries had drays when I was in my teens; I think Vaux in Sunderland kept one until the early eighties, and Tetley in Leeds had a dray until 2006.

But how about this for a unique job: elephant drover.




Ey up, that's Tommy Ward's Elephant! Technically Lucy (the Elephant in the picture) didn't pull a dray (you can just see the wagon says "Thos W Ward. LTD, Albion Works Sheffield"), she belonged to a circus that wintered in Sheffield during the First World War and was hired out by a local steel works when their wagon horses were requisitioned as part of the War effort, becoming a bit of a publicity stunt (another local works hired the circus' zebras) and giving rise to a local phrase 'Looking like Tommy Ward's Elephant' meaning someone pulling/carrying a heavy load.

And on another note, incendiary bombs (in particular those used by the Luftwaffe during the Second World War) were quite small cylinders (around 4-5 inches long 2 inches in diameter) with a phosphorus 'core' and were dropped several hundred at a time. Because of the use as phosphorous as the actual incendiary material the best way to extinguish one was by covering it with sand (thereby smothering the flame) and leaving it to cool.
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Will Howard
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



« Reply #13 on: April 12, 2014, 08:03:55 pm »

http://imgur.com/a/S3lOX







lectors


I would totally be a lector, and totally wouldn't mind a human switch board operator, and who doesn't want lamp lighters back.
We actually could get milk delivered here, but I can't drink it and the guy I share this floor with is lactose intolerant. And sending logs by river is probably a more ecologically sound idea than using petrol guzzling trucks. I'd also had the idea some time ago that making a modern day Ice house just made sense for this region. we have winters enough to freeze tap water into blocks of ice that could make a great enough supply to last year round with modern insulation techniques.


If you became a lector & came from Carthage (North Africa or North America) you might be named Hannibal-
HANNIBAL LECTOR!!!
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RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #14 on: April 12, 2014, 08:24:45 pm »

Quote
bowling pin setter
milk men

Both of these jobs still exist in Detroit.

The pin setters are volunteers at a small bowling alley recently discovered and reopened on the basement of a long-empty storefront in the Corktown neighborhood. The building has been made into a community center.

The milkmen work for Calder Dairy, a small storefront diary in the suburb of Lincoln park; the delivery area is limited and the service is a bit more expensive than buying it at the grocery store.
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Rory B Esq BSc
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #15 on: April 12, 2014, 09:14:10 pm »

I think the Park estate in Nottingham still has a lamplighter, and the Thames mud-larks are still goin.
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Keith_Beef
Snr. Officer
****
France France


« Reply #16 on: April 12, 2014, 09:24:53 pm »

Ey up, that's Tommy Ward's Elephant! Technically Lucy (the Elephant in the picture) didn't pull a dray (you can just see the wagon says "Thos W Ward. LTD, Albion Works Sheffield"), she belonged to a circus that wintered in Sheffield during the First World War and was hired out by a local steel works when their wagon horses were requisitioned as part of the War effort, becoming a bit of a publicity stunt (another local works hired the circus' zebras) and giving rise to a local phrase 'Looking like Tommy Ward's Elephant' meaning someone pulling/carrying a heavy load.

And on another note, incendiary bombs (in particular those used by the Luftwaffe during the Second World War) were quite small cylinders (around 4-5 inches long 2 inches in diameter) with a phosphorus 'core' and were dropped several hundred at a time. Because of the use as phosphorous as the actual incendiary material the best way to extinguish one was by covering it with sand (thereby smothering the flame) and leaving it to cool.

"Lizzie", not Lucy. And going out "dressed up like Tommy Ward's elephant" is going out on the pull dressed in your finery: look at the straps and brass bits that Lizzie's wearing in that glamour shot.
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Moderator
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #17 on: April 12, 2014, 09:41:51 pm »

Some of these still exist, well two of them anyway... rat catchers and milk men.

I know the rat catchers, a father and son team. They still use Jack Russell's for catching/killing the rats on farms and they also use Ferrets for rabbit trapping.

Rat catchers?  We definitely need one in these apartment building complexes full of students in Austin.  The rental market is so inflated in this city that landlords are nearing tenament/slum level when they overprice old dilapidated buildings - and yes all manner of critters live inside the walls as all American wall construction is typically hollow with wood and plaster.

I had the displeasure of killing a rat 3 weeks ago with a giant wooden mousetrap, and one week later rolling over a mouse with the casters (wheels) of a chair.

On the other hand... just buy a cat.
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #18 on: April 12, 2014, 10:38:25 pm »

Tailor's apprentice.

These are few and far between these days.

House maid - I need one of these.
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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #19 on: April 12, 2014, 10:42:41 pm »

Ey up, that's Tommy Ward's Elephant! Technically Lucy (the Elephant in the picture) didn't pull a dray (you can just see the wagon says "Thos W Ward. LTD, Albion Works Sheffield"), she belonged to a circus that wintered in Sheffield during the First World War and was hired out by a local steel works when their wagon horses were requisitioned as part of the War effort, becoming a bit of a publicity stunt (another local works hired the circus' zebras) and giving rise to a local phrase 'Looking like Tommy Ward's Elephant' meaning someone pulling/carrying a heavy load.

And on another note, incendiary bombs (in particular those used by the Luftwaffe during the Second World War) were quite small cylinders (around 4-5 inches long 2 inches in diameter) with a phosphorus 'core' and were dropped several hundred at a time. Because of the use as phosphorous as the actual incendiary material the best way to extinguish one was by covering it with sand (thereby smothering the flame) and leaving it to cool.

"Lizzie", not Lucy. And going out "dressed up like Tommy Ward's elephant" is going out on the pull dressed in your finery: look at the straps and brass bits that Lizzie's wearing in that glamour shot.

I've never heard that usage, and (I'll admit I'm no ossler) but that looks like a perfectly normal harness that would be used on a horse, albeit adapted to accommodate a larger animal.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #20 on: April 13, 2014, 12:23:08 am »

In New Zealand   where  logging is still a primary industry ,  logs are still usually sent  via river or  other water course.  We still have bowling  pin  setters. There has been the odd resurrectionist catering to a black market.

 Possibly milkmen in some areas.  Lectors in some churches .  Pre  radar plane listeners  left in a few isolated areas

- Along with a  plethora of other quaint quirks
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #21 on: April 13, 2014, 12:28:27 am »

recent employment ads in NZ

http://www.unijobs.co.nz/job/4DPZ/Lector+in+Arabic+28Part+Time29

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pakled05
Officer
***
United States United States



« Reply #22 on: April 13, 2014, 12:32:50 am »

Dowsers? Someone who uses a sticklike device to find water...

Heck, I'd be happy if live tech support doesn't disappear...Wink
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Moderator
Immortal
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United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #23 on: April 13, 2014, 04:06:59 am »

I was going to suggest Chimney Sweep, but I remembered we have many chimney sweeps here in Austin.  I did not know that wearing a top hat was customary for Chimney Sweeps:

http://areawidechimneysweep.com/index.shtml
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #24 on: April 13, 2014, 10:28:31 am »

I was going to suggest Chimney Sweep, but I remembered we have many chimney sweeps here in Austin.  I did not know that wearing a top hat was customary for Chimney Sweeps:

http://areawidechimneysweep.com/index.shtml



 The  grim tales of the fates of young chimney sweeps of a previous era  give the heebee geebees to think of them.  Larger houses had twisting turning complex networks of  chimneys and flues. Small children were often lost in them when sent up.  There was no way of locating them  with out dismantling   houses so they  were left in there.
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