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Author Topic: Victorian/SP photographer  (Read 3815 times)
frances
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #25 on: April 09, 2014, 10:58:06 pm »

The round thing on the left-hand side of the chatelaine is a pin-cushion.  It is a padded circle and the pins are stuck around the circumference at even intervals.  The knobs sticking out are porcelain heads of the pins.  Parts of ladies dress would be pinned together so additional pins were needed incase of emergencies when you were out and about.

Thanks for the close-ups.
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George Salt
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #26 on: April 09, 2014, 11:16:35 pm »

Thanks frances, could the second item be a needle case?
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George Salt
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« Reply #27 on: April 17, 2014, 02:31:39 pm »

This morning's post brought an unusual example to add to my collection, a cabinet card, and it's interesting enough to bump my planned carte for this week.  These are significantly larger than carte de visite, the backing card being 4.25" x 6.5".  They didn't become popular until the second half of the 1860s, but there is significant over-lap with the date range of carte de visite.



The sitter is an older gentleman in three piece suit, with prominent medals/fobs on his watch chain and a delicate buttonhole of rosebud and fern frond.

The reverse of the card is blank, and the text and typeface on the front are unlike any other I have examples of from this studio.  It's another image from the studio of John Inskip of Scarborough, there is no indication of which of his studio addresses the image is from, the name of the sitter or the date.  I'm hoping there may be some fashion clues as to date that someone can identify.  The glimpses of details of the chair and table may allow me to relate these props to images from known studio addressees.



The larger size of the print allows some very fine detail to be made out, even the texture of the weave can be distinguished, the fabric covered buttons and piping and ribbon details on the jacket.



More interesting hand details in close-up.  There is a distinctive striped signet ring on the right hand and a wedding band on the left hand.

Of the two watch fobs one appears to be reversible, whist the other looks is very familiar but I can't place where I have seen it before.  Is it a religious medal or a symbol of membership of an order or organisation?


Notes for the fauxtographer:

There's just a hint of movement blur on the watch fobs, the exposure duration is at least a couple of breaths.
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #28 on: April 17, 2014, 10:49:21 pm »

"could the second item be a needle case?"

I'd be guessing if I said yes.  There is not really enough detail is there.
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ColeV
Gunner
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United States United States



« Reply #29 on: April 18, 2014, 01:56:16 pm »

Yep, all sewing implements. Pin cushion, needle case, embroidery scissors, and a thimble cup. The Met Museum has a large number of these on their site if you want to see better details: http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections?&ft=chatelaine&what=Chatelaines&pg=1
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Argus Fairbrass
Rogue Ætherlord
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England England


So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #30 on: April 19, 2014, 12:34:19 pm »





Wish I'd spotted this post earlier, bit late to the party but nevertheless this is a great picture. I don't see these turn up very often. It's a lounge jacket or smoking jacket if you prefer. Adopted as casual evening dress as frockcoats were technically day wear at this time. These days they are commonly referred to as "Prince Edward" (Victoria's son as opposed to the one who later abdicated) jackets. In the fifties the drape coats worn by "Edwardians" or Teddy Boys were inspired by them. Although curiously I've yet to see a picture of Edward actually wearing one.

Eventually this more drape style of tailoring would become standard, and long line jackets remained for a brief period before everything shortened to today's standards.



They're now most commonly found in wedding shops as they're still popular with bridegrooms and often inaccurately referred to as frock coats. I wouldn't say the silk tape was that unusual, I have many pictures of various frock suits and sack suits that are hogwild with it.

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Have her steamed and brought to my tent!
frances
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #31 on: April 19, 2014, 07:19:28 pm »

Is this an old photograph?  The reason I ask is the creases down the front of the trousers.  I believe that these were a post-Victorian fashion statement.
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Argus Fairbrass
Rogue Ætherlord
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England England


So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #32 on: April 20, 2014, 11:32:50 am »

As I say it was a transitional fashion, so most likely Edwardian era, possibly early 1920's at the very latest.
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Will Howard
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States



« Reply #33 on: April 20, 2014, 01:57:56 pm »

As I say it was a transitional fashion, so most likely Edwardian era, possibly early 1920's at the very latest.

I'd agree with you on that, Mr. Fairbrass.
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