The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
March 04, 2021, 07:43:59 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Seapunk - My Steampunk Experiment  (Read 1333 times)
drumwvu
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« on: November 25, 2013, 12:30:21 pm »

I am a bit of a mad scientist when it comes to stories. My latest concoction attempts to take Steampunk out to sea. I would love to get some feedback from everyone on the flash fiction story below. Does my subgenre still have enough Steampunk elements to remain true to its parent? I'm kicking around doing some more work to help create this subgenre within Steampunk, but I wanted to get some solid feeback first. Thank you for your time.


Cat and Mouse: A Seapunk Adventure
By Joshua Dyer
 


The Captain of the USS Endeavor fixed his blue stare on the rippling horizon. The massive ninety-foot paddlewheel of the carrier plodded a frothy course through the Atlantic’s undulations.
“He’s out there,” Captain Walker said peering through the large glass observation dome.
The ginger-haired skipper flicked the first two digits of his upturned hand.
“The spyglass.”
“Aye, sir.” One of his Junior Officers set the small brass tube in Walker’s meaty palm.
He scanned the choppy waters for any sign of his foe.
“Right paddle, half-stop,” he barked to his crew in the observation dome. “Bring her around to starboard.”
Two of Walker’s First Classes echoed his order. The taller of the two slammed the paddle lever down to the large ‘half-stop’ in red lettering, and then brought it back up to its neutral position.
“Right paddle, half-stop, sir.”
“Very well, Jones,” Walker said as he studied the seas.
“Coming around to starboard, sir,” the Quarter Master said.
Walker set down his telescope and put the receiver to his right ear.
“Lookout,” he said watching his other shipmates scurry across the foredecks of his vessel, “anything from your vantage point?”
The young Seaman rotated his large set of binoculars around on their post. “Nothing from here, sir.”
It’s not going to get any easier once the sun sets, he thought eyeing the orange and black clouds to the west. Might be time for aerial –
The Endeavor’s warning sirens cut the still of the evening air.
A cluster of white tees and dungarees amassed amidships off the port side. “Enemy sub off port!” several sailors exclaimed jabbing fingers to Walker’s eleven o’clock.
Walker flipped the switch on his console and picked up the small receiver.
“Battle stations, battle stations! All hands.” His voice rang out over every nook and cranny on the massive aircraft carrier.
“Get me a line of bearing on that fish,” he said pointing his spyglass in the direction of the sighting.
“Sir,” a Second Class said from behind her position, “I have them at 74 degrees, four minutes, two seconds at a distance of six miles.”
“Copy that,” Walker said. He turned to the short portly man to his left. “Commander?”
“Sir,” the Endeavor’s Executive Officer said.
“Get three of our birds airborne on that line!”
“Aye, aye, sir,” his short sidekick said.
Walker watched as three planes made their way out onto the flight deck. An aviation deckhand fired up the front propeller on the first bi-plane. Its narrow-spaced pairs of wings unfolded as four more handlers locked them into place. The pilot shot a thumbs-up from his cockpit to the handler in front of his plane. The jet engine on the underbelly of the fighter fired to life pushing the restraining cables to their limits. The handler stepped to port and motioned his hands down the flight deck. Each of the AC-231 Avengers bolted down the runway and darted off into the darkening skies en route toward the enemy.
“Left paddle half-stop,” he commanded. “Bring us around on their bearing.”
His able crew executed the order with precision as the observation dome slowly spun counterclockwise.  Once the bow of the vessel had reached the desired point, the Endeavor sped all ahead into the fray.
The three Avengers wove narrowing circles around the last known position of the enemy submarine.
“Any sign of them from above?” Walker asked. His inquisitive gaze rolled toward his XO.
“Nothing yet, sir,” a pilot said through broken static.
“Get me another line of --”
A bright blue bulb flashed over the copper map of the Endeavor on his console.
“Direct hit off starboard, sir,” a Lieutenant said studying the map.
“Damn!”
The hand receiver next to the blue bulb rang into his bridge. Walker knew who was on the other side and what they wanted.
He placed the handset to his ear. “Walker here.”
“Looks like I win this round, Tim,” the voice said over the weak connection.
Walker watched as the black metal body of a giant swordfish broke the surface a quarter of a mile over his right shoulder. The boat’s clear bubbles glared back at him like a huge pair of insect’s eyes.  
“I won’t go as easy on you next time, Mike,” he said watching the sub bob on the waves.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2013, 12:56:56 pm by drumwvu » Logged
Atterton
Time Traveler
****

Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2013, 12:43:53 pm »

Why do you think having the story take place out at sea will change anything?
Logged

Resurrectionist and freelance surgeon.
drumwvu
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2013, 12:49:27 pm »

You could ask the same thing about Cyberpunk yet it still exists and does quite well. 
Logged
Cpt. Vanderstorme
Officer
***
Netherlands Netherlands


It's the Captain, Lilith Vanderstorme!


WWW
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2013, 05:20:42 pm »

Have you tried googling seapunk? Hilarious imagery, just give it a try!
Logged

drumwvu
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2013, 05:34:14 pm »

The sub-culture of music? Yeah, I've seen just about all of it.
Logged
Siliconous Skumins
Server Monk
Governor
Rogue Ætherlord
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2013, 05:36:50 pm »

You could ask the same thing about Cyberpunk yet it still exists and does quite well. 

I think you missed the point of the question...

If it's Steampunk, generally speaking it involves a Victorian / Edwardian time period and / or aesthetic of the 19th to very early in the 20th centuries, although futuristic and dystopian themes are accepted. It will generally consist of most technology relying on steam power in some form. It may include any form of transport, such as space travel.

Cyberpunk is set in the near to distant future, involves heavy use of electronics and computers, and typically is of a dystopian nature. Futuristic power sources and complex crossover of human and machine are common themes. Again any form of transport is accepted, though generally futuristic in nature.


Both genres can be set on a ship at sea without changing anything that is already accepted...



The question was - "Why does setting it at sea make it different?"
I refer you to 'Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea' - accepted as both Steampunk and set at sea... Wink


SS
Logged

[Server Prayer]
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
drumwvu
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2013, 06:07:01 pm »

I see. Then it would fall under Steampunk by that set of rules. I understand. I'm here to share stories not win arguments. I hope you enjoyed it whatever label suits it best.
Logged
Siliconous Skumins
Server Monk
Governor
Rogue Ætherlord
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2013, 07:52:04 pm »

I see. Then it would fall under Steampunk by that set of rules. I understand. I'm here to share stories not win arguments. I hope you enjoyed it whatever label suits it best.

Oh no arguments here, and the "rules" of steampunk are not set in stone either. Apologies if it came off that way. Smiley
We were simply curious as to why you thought a sea theme made it different, that's all.

SS
Logged
drumwvu
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2013, 07:57:16 pm »

A misunderstanding on my part. No hard feelings at all. I'd be happy to share my scribblings and tighten up my knowledge if you ladies and gentlemen will have it. Thank you again for the insights.
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2013, 07:49:46 pm »

The trick is not conflicting with other movements/trends which have already adopted the name:

From the New York Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/04/fashion/Seapunk-a-Web-Joke-With-Music-Has-Its-Moment.html
Quote
Sprouting from the digital petri dish of social networking, seapunk is a whimsical style that mashes together cartoonish aquatic themes, rave culture and a nostalgia for ’90s Internet imagery. The iconography, which exists almost entirely online, includes clip art of dolphins jumping through pyramids, aquamarine-haired mermaids with SpongeBob T-shirts, and psychedelic orbs flying over computer-generated waves.

“The surprising thing is that it really was cohesive,” Lil Internet said by iChat; he declined to use his legal name, saying he is now known solely by his Twitter handle. He also described seapunk’s vibe as “Venice Beach Acid Rave 1995,” and cited surf-wear logos, yin-yang symbols and round holographic sunglasses as part of its look.

*snip*

Started online last year by a tiny sect of social media geeks, seapunk gathered momentum as it echoed on Twitter, Facebook and especially Tumblr. It has occasionally surfaced, in the real world, with seapunk-themed parties and bands, but the real joy remains in tagging and sharing the trippy nautical images.

*snip*

Seapunk has also given rise to a tiny music sub-genre, although the “punk” element would not be recognized by Joey Ramone. The spacey electronic dance music borrows from Witch House, Chiptune, Drum & Bass and southern rap. Some tracks remix songs from R&B acts like Beyoncé and Aaliyah.

Despite their subculture status, seapunkers insist that their sensibility has been appropriated by the mainstream, or at least leeched by celebrity stylists. There’s no concrete evidence of piracy, but pop culture has indeed seen recent splashes of aquamarine: Nicki Minaj painted her skin blue for a Vogue shoot; Katy Perry wore a turquoise bob; a Google Image search of “seapunk” pulls up a photo of Lady Gaga with a neon blue wig.




.....

I'm not sure what to make of it...  but I finally see why the aquatic themes on Pop singers.  This seems to be a Pop Music-related subculture/fashion trend (and I'm not sure it rises to status of subculture).

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/04/fashion/Seapunk-a-Web-Joke-With-Music-Has-Its-Moment.html

See last picture
http://style.mtv.com/2013/08/25/lady-gaga-applause-vmas/
« Last Edit: November 26, 2013, 07:57:32 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.287 seconds with 16 queries.