The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
April 27, 2018, 08:23:27 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Steampunk Caricatures, Cliches & Stereotypes  (Read 9781 times)
Vagabond GentleMan
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Clockwork Sepia


WWW
« Reply #25 on: September 29, 2013, 01:29:14 am »

This could easily turn into a "what is Steampunk" discussion, ya know?

Who cares that corsets were once-upon-a-time underwear?  They ain't now.  We're steamPUNKS, not re-enactors.

Goggles aren't hatbands.
Zepps aren't so great.  There are better ways to fly.  We also probably talk about them far too often for people who don't have access to them.
Flintlocks?  AND with gears?  Really?  There's nothing right about that, historically or practically.

But who cares?

...not to say we aren't allowed pet peeves...cuz we have a right to 'em.  e.g. Goggles as a hatband is steampunk cliche and I don't much like it.  But even I don't care that I don't like it...  Tongue

In fact, wow, I don't care that I don't like it SO much that I'm not gonna change my profile pic from half-a-decade ago in which I'm wearing goggles as a hatband...  Grin
Logged

Well that wolf has a dimber bonebox, and he'll flash it all milky and red.  But you won't see our Red Jack's spit, nug, cuz he's pinked ya, and yer dead.
LadyHelena
Swab

United States United States


« Reply #26 on: September 29, 2013, 04:33:36 am »

As a friend of mine stated - if Superman can go around in his underwear, I shall go around in mine as well.

But my half-imagined character likes to shock and scandalize others, so I guess it works. The fact that I wear pants would have my labeled as a lady of the evening no matter what I wore on top, so I might as well go all out.
Logged
Fairley B. Strange
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Australia Australia


Relax, I've done much dumber things and survived..


WWW
« Reply #27 on: September 29, 2013, 09:17:42 am »


Flintlocks?  AND with gears?  Really?  There's nothing right about that, historically or practically.

But who cares?

"Flint-locks? AND with gears" are Wheel-locks, historically, practically and pedantically...  Cheesy
Logged

Choose a code to live by, die by it if you have to.
Sludge Van Diesel
Zeppelin Captain
*****
England England


SteampunkDJ.co.uk


WWW
« Reply #28 on: September 29, 2013, 12:44:09 pm »

Goggles aren't hatbands.
They are when they've got clock faces & the like where the lens should be, because you sure as hell can't see through the damn things.
Logged

Better to study for one hour with the wise, than to drink wine with the foolish

www.steampunkdj.co.uk  Please follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/SteampunkDJ & Facebook https://www.facebook.com/steampunkdj
Argus Fairbrass
Rogue Ætherlord
*
England England


So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #29 on: September 29, 2013, 02:46:02 pm »

I get a bit confused about the whole goggles things, peoples attitudes about it I mean. I tend to choose different styles that I think suit different outfits. I had a small exchange with a guy on Facebook, because he didn't understand goggles on top hats for example. He was basically asking how fast do you think you're going to go wearing a topper?

I just basically said there are different styles of goggles for different purposes just like glasses. They're not all about speed necessarily, the ones I wear on my top hat look more scientific. They have loupes so they can be used for assistance with detailed work, or reading or shooting or looking for clues haha. They also offer eye protection from city smog, or all sorts of situations one might encounter while dressed in what was essentially semi formal day wear.

If I'm dressed a bit more old western (which in my case tends to mean changing the top hat for a cowboy hat) then I wear ones that look more designed for dust protection. It actually surprises me that you don't see them more in historical photos. I have an old picture of British workers and foreman in a quarry for example. The foreman are dressed pretty smartly, but there's dust billowing up everywhere and no eye protection in evidence at all.

I get that folks do sometimes wear styles that seem quite out of context with their outfits, and personally I've always tried to avoid that. But I guess I don't find them as inappropriate as some people seem to, and the brim of your hat seems as good a place as any to keep them when not in use.
Logged

Have her steamed and brought to my tent!
Vagabond GentleMan
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Clockwork Sepia


WWW
« Reply #30 on: September 29, 2013, 10:08:04 pm »


Flintlocks?  AND with gears?  Really?  There's nothing right about that, historically or practically.

But who cares?

"Flint-locks? AND with gears" are Wheel-locks, historically, practically and pedantically...  Cheesy

Hahaha!  Well-played, sir!

...but you know what I'm talking about...wheel-locks are wheel-locks, flintlocks with gears glued on them are...props, I guess.  Smiley


Logged
MWBailey
Rogue Ætherlord
*
United States United States


"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #31 on: September 30, 2013, 01:09:11 am »

Flintlocks?  AND with gears?  Really?  There's nothing right about that, historically or practically.

But who cares?
"Flint-locks? AND with gears" are Wheel-locks, historically, practically and pedantically...  Cheesy
Hahaha!  Well-played, sir!
...but you know what I'm talking about...wheel-locks are wheel-locks, flintlocks with gears glued on them are...props, I guess.  Smiley




Nah, they're pedantlocks. Don't get me started on dogheads (the 'hammer' part of a wheelock), or hammer-chains...



I get a bit confused about the whole goggles things, peoples attitudes about it I mean. I tend to choose different styles that I think suit different outfits. I had a small exchange with a guy on Facebook, because he didn't understand goggles on top hats for example. He was basically asking how fast do you think you're going to go wearing a topper?

I just basically said there are different styles of goggles for different purposes just like glasses. They're not all about speed necessarily, the ones I wear on my top hat look more scientific. They have loupes so they can be used for assistance with detailed work, or reading or shooting or looking for clues haha. They also offer eye protection from city smog, or all sorts of situations one might encounter while dressed in what was essentially semi formal day wear.

If I'm dressed a bit more old western (which in my case tends to mean changing the top hat for a cowboy hat) then I wear ones that look more designed for dust protection. It actually surprises me that you don't see them more in historical photos. I have an old picture of British workers and foreman in a quarry for example. The foreman are dressed pretty smartly, but there's dust billowing up everywhere and no eye protection in evidence at all.

I get that folks do sometimes wear styles that seem quite out of context with their outfits, and personally I've always tried to avoid that. But I guess I don't find them as inappropriate as some people seem to, and the brim of your hat seems as good a place as any to keep them when not in use.




You have to put 'em somewhere, and in your pocket becomes problematic once you start using your pockets to hold things other than air. Caps are more 'likely' to my mind as  headgear worn in conjunction with goggles, but then again I do tend to wear my everyday ones (an all purpose pair made from a pair of fits-over sunglasses) with the widebrim palmleaf hat I don for yardwork and especially mowing or tractor driving (long story), so I can see why one would be wearing goggles with whatever headgear one is apt to wear.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2013, 08:29:25 am by MWBailey » Logged

Walk softly and carry a big banjo...

""quid statis aspicientes in infernum"
Camellia Wingnut
Snr. Officer
****
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands


Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #32 on: September 30, 2013, 11:23:44 pm »

My Dear Fairy Penguin,
It is hard to make missionaries cool. And can Colonel Gudgeon be real?
At the Polynesian Cultural Centre on Oahu there is displayed a list of the garments to be brought to Hawaii by Victorian missionaries. (Steam evangelism, you might say.) It is a counter-trousseau of sorts, but it makes clear the attitude that only one's clothes stood between the Christian and 'going native.' Thus, there was a requirement that one dressed exactly as one would in New England, for the changing seasons, with unthinkable layers of perspiration-steamed wool.
However, that fact makes a valid point about Steam clothing, and Victorian clothing generally. The Queen's fanatical mourning influenced the choice of dark colours - except, as you say, for Tartan - and many layers even of white summer muslin and cotton. Basically, the clothing of the Steam era was too hot. I suppose that is why Steampunk ladies see no alternative than to limit their garments to petticoats and corsets and stop there. (Grinding sound of missionaries turning in their graves.)
This is a problem for South Seas Steampunk. Our outfits are, one way or another, too Steamy!
C.W.
Logged

Take my camel, dear, said my aunt Camellia, climbing down from that animal on her return from high mass. The camel, a white Arabian Dhalur (single hump) from the famous herd of the Ruola tribe, had been a parting present, its saddle-bags stuffed with low-carat [sic] gold and flashy orient gems, from a rich desert tycoon. . . .
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #33 on: October 01, 2013, 12:31:27 am »

Indeed Miss Wingnut, outfitting oneself for  the southern colonies  did involve layers upon layers of extraneous clothing, for reasons of  fashion, tradition and modesty.

 The missionaries  staid and conservative.  Au Contraire . Many of of the churchmen sent out  were involved with scandals involving  overly intimate and inappropriate liaison with native folk [both genders] and sailors.  Some left the colony under a cloud  or were banished to the cold barren ,  further flung islands.

  Covert relationships with  Maori housekeepers were maintained over decades, children appearing  unspoken.  A changing stream of young male "pupils" or wards in a continuous flow.  A prior native wife abandoned by the way side wen a "suitable bride" or clergy sanction wife  arrived from the old country.

 Often those sent out  were remittance men, shadowed by ill famed behaviours and addictions.

  Betwixt the couture of the day and menfolks proclivities  it is no wonder women of the day were plagued with regular  attacks of the 'vapours'
 
« Last Edit: October 01, 2013, 08:11:53 am by Hurricane Annie » Logged
Sludge Van Diesel
Zeppelin Captain
*****
England England


SteampunkDJ.co.uk


WWW
« Reply #34 on: November 09, 2013, 02:19:14 am »

While we're at it, what's th deal with ray-guns?
Logged
Vagabond GentleMan
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Clockwork Sepia


WWW
« Reply #35 on: November 09, 2013, 09:05:56 pm »

Ray guns?  Well, Tesla probably designed the prototype (SP cliche) for the air-pirates (again) he hired to defeat Edison and protect themselves against air-krakens (again).  The larger versions are mounted on the their zeps (uh-huh) and are made of brass and hardwood with elaborate gearing (you know it).  The intense light generated by the weapons require the marksmen to wear elaborate goggles (yep).
When they are particularly poorly crafted and uninspired, they're sold on Etsy and we wax snooty about the Steampunk aesthetic.
Logged
polyphemus
Zeppelin Captain
*****

« Reply #36 on: November 09, 2013, 09:27:31 pm »

Wax Snooty is a particularly good steampunk name.
Logged

Polphemus Pomfret
"Don't be silly. He wouldn't write,"Aaarrgghhh!"
"Perhaps he was dictating."
frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #37 on: November 09, 2013, 11:48:58 pm »

Sounds like a Victorian puppet / fantoccini to me!
Logged
walking stick
Zeppelin Admiral
******
England England


« Reply #38 on: November 10, 2013, 10:57:34 am »

Sounds more like a superior brand of moustache grooming product to me.
Logged
Arabella Periscope
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Edwardian summer


« Reply #39 on: November 10, 2013, 09:30:29 pm »

Yes! For that stiff upper lip!
Logged

Kenneth: 'If you're so hot, you can tell me how to say she has ideas above her station.'
Brian:'Oh yes, I forgot. It's fairly easy, old boy.
Elle a des idees au-dessus de sa gare.'
Kenneth: 'Idiot.  It's not that kind of station.'

Terence Rattigan 'French Without Tears.'
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.156 seconds with 15 queries.