The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
April 25, 2018, 02:07:14 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: The "perceived need for a persona to be Steampunk"  (Read 3593 times)
Vagabond GentleMan
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Clockwork Sepia


WWW
« Reply #50 on: September 28, 2013, 04:54:56 am »

Missed ya, Von Corax... Smiley
Logged

Well that wolf has a dimber bonebox, and he'll flash it all milky and red.  But you won't see our Red Jack's spit, nug, cuz he's pinked ya, and yer dead.
hardlec
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Solutions do not need Problems


« Reply #51 on: September 28, 2013, 04:34:06 pm »

I work with developmentally delayed adults.  For the time I am incarcerated in reality I see the real, the cruel, the ugly and the nasty.  I try to make life better for the helpless and disenfranchised, and it works a little.  There is some joy and good stuff.

For a little while I get to have a chance to dwell in a fantasy realm. I try not to overthink it.

I like to make things and steampunk gives me a purpose.

I am assembling costumes. Each costume has a character attached. The story helps the design of the costume. If this is a persona, well, I have three. 

When I see how much people spend on sports trend, or "current" fashion, or cars, or (whatever) I can only suggest that there is no mundane and we all have personas.

I need more absinthe.
Logged

Whatever happens we have got
The Maxim gun and they have not;
Technology is no substitute for Valor
Both are true.
Vagabond GentleMan
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Clockwork Sepia


WWW
« Reply #52 on: September 29, 2013, 12:46:59 am »

Hardlec does touch on something...we might need to define (or at least wax philosophic upon the definition of) "Persona".

If you were at a con and some American comes up in some elaborate costume introducing themselves as "Sir Capt. Rev. Von Pompous III, Esq." in an affected accent, it's easy.  Yes, that person is in persona.

Hardlec is assembling costumes, each with a character in mind.  Is that necessarily persona?

When I assemble an outfit in the morning, I certainly have themes....this outfit is more American west so I wear this waistcoat, these trousers, this hat.  This outfit is more Gangs of New York, so I wear THIS waistcoat, trousers, hat.  Etc.

Because Hardlec calls them costumes and I call them outfits or because Hardlec thinks 'character' and I think 'theme', how different are our approaches, really?

Hardlec also illustrates a more 'metaphysical' question about persona...it's said we all wear masks, or alternatively, we all don 'hats'.  Simply put, we adjust behavior depending on what is and what is not appropriate in any given social situation, to a greater or lesser degree veering from our imagined 'True Self'.

I'm a tattoo artist.  We have a long and glorious tradition of adopting Jolly Pirate Nicknames or Nomme de Guerres or Pen Names or what have you (Sailor Jerry, Jack Dracula, Mr. Cartoon, et al).  My Mentor had one and I modified and adopted it in homage, as will my apprentice when she becomes a career tattoo artist.  So, every day I introduce myself with a name that has nothing to do with the scribbles on my birth certificate.
Furthermore, to be effective as a tattoo artist, you MUST have developed some combination of Bedside Manner and Showmanship.
So, for a good portion of my every day life, I'm "On" and pseudo-performing.

Kinda sounds like persona...but (arguments aside), it isn't.  It's my daily life.  It's part of my identity. It's ALL me, as integrated into my Self as anyone.

...so where are the lines drawn?  Where does persona begin and end?
Logged
Sludge Van Diesel
Zeppelin Captain
*****
England England


SteampunkDJ.co.uk


WWW
« Reply #53 on: September 29, 2013, 03:03:15 am »

OK then for the purpose of this thread (ie what I was talking about): Steampunks that go into character was soon as they don their SP togs & remain so until they've taken them off.
Logged

Better to study for one hour with the wise, than to drink wine with the foolish

www.steampunkdj.co.uk  Please follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/SteampunkDJ & Facebook https://www.facebook.com/steampunkdj
MWBailey
Rogue Ætherlord
*
United States United States


"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #54 on: September 30, 2013, 06:32:28 am »

Oh. Well, that knocks me out. I'm me, whatever I wear. (Yes, I really am like this in everyday life, though sometimes my speech is somewhat less refined and has a definite Texan 'twang').
Logged

Walk softly and carry a big banjo...

""quid statis aspicientes in infernum"
lingarn
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #55 on: October 01, 2013, 10:24:17 pm »

Earlier in the thread, or in a related one, I saw someone post something to the effect "I am not pretending to be a steampunk; I am a steampunk".

It is here, I think, that the divergence occurs.

I find the likelihood that whomever wrote that is, in fact, a member of a Neo-Victorian society in which technology is primarily powered through steam engines to be quite low.  "Steampunk" as an aesthetic has branched out to impact many aspects of life, but many people are cognizant of the fact that Steampunk is a literary genre, a fictional representation of a world that never was.  The extent to which people choose to engage that fiction varies -- for some, it is just an attraction to the style of brass, leather, and wood.  For others, the concept of applying Victorian and maker values to everyday life is appealing.  For some, the act of dressing up goes beyond this, to pretending that you are a member of such a society while you are wearing your costume -- they engage with and become part of the fiction.

This kind of phenomenon is not limited to "real life".  If you have ever played an MMORPG, you will know that while some people are content to talk about politics, memes, gearscores, and so on, other people form communities of roleplayers who act as though they are their avatars.  Rather than behaving as a person playing a game, their enjoyment comes from pretending to be the character on the screen, and interacting with other people who are doing the same.

I do not believe, in the case of Steampunk, that this is likely to be limited to a particular geographical region.  Just as a person who isn't into RP would be unlikely to create a character on a Roleplay oriented server, I expect a Steampunk who is mostly in it for the style would be less likely to find the sorts of events that attract people who are participating more actively in the fiction. 

Why some people are more attracted to style and others to the roleplay is, I think, a complicated question with a multitude of potential and highly personal answers, but in general I think another poster struck the heart of it:  they do what they think is fun.

My thoughts.

Lingarn
Logged
Octavius von Gilgamesh
Immortal
**
Australia Australia


Captain of the Ariadne's Sorrow


« Reply #56 on: October 02, 2013, 01:17:40 am »

To my mind, a persona is not necessarily required to be Steampunk, but it is just another off shoot of the genre. Vagabond GentleMan makes a good point, about, at least for some of us, that the persona is a mask or hat that we wear, to differentiate ourselves from the everyday around us. In my personal experience, there are not that many in my personal group who have taken on the affectation, but those that do, myself included feel, and I do not want to get all hippie with this, but there is a sense of freedom that you get with a persona. You can be someone different, and not be judged.

However, there are those who use their personas in their every day lives, and sometime it works, especially if you are in a job that allows it, but if you work in a office, then personas are not really the norm. Sure, you can wear the clothes, at least to the degree that you are allowed to, but calling yourself a different name does not really occur.

My personal belief if that your persona soon becomes your state of mind, and allows you to act differently to those around you, and as the Age of Steam is one of ethics and manners (to a large degree at least) then this can only be a good thing.
Logged

May the gods stand between you and harm, in all the empty places where you must walk.
Capitan Diavolo
Gunner
**
Italy Italy



« Reply #57 on: October 12, 2013, 09:43:44 pm »

Already answered the same in another similarly related thread, but think it is pertinent to do it in this one, too...

In real life I'm a former military, reached the rank of Colonel. The equiparative rank in the Italian Navy is "Capitano di Vascello", so here the rank of Capitano (Captain) I'm using in almost all internet forums.
"Diavolo" means "Devil", and that was my callsign.

Just stuck the two and there you have my nickname "Capitan Diavolo", who is nobody else than me, and the main character of something I'm writing at the moment.

In any case, my real name is Paolo Colussi, and this too is in my signature.



 So there is not a "persona" here... Just me.

Cheers
Logged

Sludge Van Diesel
Zeppelin Captain
*****
England England


SteampunkDJ.co.uk


WWW
« Reply #58 on: October 16, 2013, 09:41:06 pm »

A number of people have said they have a persona & what it is, but crucially have failed to say why.

Probably best to do so in the other thread though http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,41104.0.html

 In this thread I really wanted to find out if the notion that one was needed (I don't believe it is) put people off.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2013, 09:44:52 pm by Sludge Van Diesel » Logged
Gustaf Danielsson
Officer
***
United States United States


Troll Hunter and Arctic Explorer


« Reply #59 on: November 12, 2013, 05:02:23 am »

OK then for the purpose of this thread (ie what I was talking about): Steampunks that go into character was soon as they don their SP togs & remain so until they've taken them off.

I know a lot of steampunks with personas, and I can't say that I know any that stay in their persona the entire time they are in costume. In general, if someone interacts with us in persona, we will respond in kind. If they interact with us out-of-character, then we respond that way as well. I would say the vast majority of the time at an event or convention, we are not speaking "in character". It's more like we enter the persona for short vignettes, and we do it because we enjoy it.
Logged

Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.049 seconds with 15 queries.