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Author Topic: air compressor to steam engine conversion  (Read 2712 times)
robotmastern
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automaton craftsman extraordinaire


« on: July 01, 2013, 02:54:49 am »

I know aluminum is not the most Steampunk of metals but its what I have laying around. The framework around the piston is all for the exhaust valve.
 


And the feed water valve
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Esteem Punk
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« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2013, 04:18:44 am »

Very good.
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Maets
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Rocket Man


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« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2013, 02:05:36 pm »

Looking forward to watching as this progresses.
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bicyclebuilder
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A.K.A. Scanner Camera Builder


« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2013, 03:04:31 pm »

Although the appearance of Aluminium isn't Steampunk, it is Victorian Era. Discovered in 1807. The Hall–Héroult process invented in 1886.  In 1888, Hall opened the first large-scale aluminium production plant in Pittsburgh. I'd say, very Steampunk indeed.

As for the project: Looking forward from a safe distance.


Is that a pressure cooker?
And is that a hand drill?
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The best way to learn is by personal experience.
IGetPwnedOften
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If at first you don't succeed, use a bigger hammer


« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2013, 03:30:44 pm »

That does look like a pressure cooker, doesn't it?

As you say, I'll be observing this from a safe distance, i.e. another continent  Grin
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"Geoffrey, take their coats. No, not up the tree..."
bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2013, 03:35:57 pm »

That does look like a pressure cooker, doesn't it?

As you say, I'll be observing this from a safe distance, i.e. another continent  Grin

Luckyly I have a large Island in bitween to catch the debries.  Grin
No, I'm sure it will be safe.
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robotmastern
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automaton craftsman extraordinaire


« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2013, 07:35:35 pm »

actually a cannier and yes a hand drill i found at my grandfathers house
all that's left to do is broach the key-way and weld a small screw on to the piston head to actuate the intake valve
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Maets
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« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2013, 08:16:16 pm »

Be sure there is a pressure relief valve.
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robotmastern
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automaton craftsman extraordinaire


« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2013, 08:32:25 pm »

there is and i have tested it both with compressed air and steam and it goes at 20 psi which is what the gauge red lines at. im planning on operating it at around 15 psi. i made sure that the relief valve is before the shut off valve
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robotmastern
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automaton craftsman extraordinaire


« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2013, 08:35:43 pm »

video of the boiler working
Pressure canner steam boiler
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bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2013, 08:28:21 am »

Nice work so far. How are you going to prevent the steam to cool down in the engine? Or do you think the steam won't turn back into water before it comes out of the engine?

(Cut-and-paste info from Wikipedia)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superheated_steam
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robotmastern
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automaton craftsman extraordinaire


« Reply #11 on: July 06, 2013, 05:26:55 am »

the fact that it is super heated is just a bonus, as with all steam engines everything needs to be preheated before it can run to prevent hydro lock, (when steam condenses in the piston in a volume greater than the smallest volume the piston will reach) so there should be little condensation, also i am planning on grinding down the cooling fins on the piston wall as they will make the engine more inefficient than it already is
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Kevin1632
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Steam breakfast of Champions


« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2013, 11:49:07 am »

In place of grinding off the fins, you could use the fins to help hold insulation around the cylinder. This will increase the efficiency of your expander.

The formula for power out for steam is;

 PSI * Area of the piston in square inches * length of the stroke in feet * the RPMs * the number of double acting pistons, (half the number of pistons if they are single acting) / 33,000 + horse power out.

Dropping in some numbers, we get;


(My guess is a three inch piston with a four and one half inch stroke, two hundred RPMs, and single acting one piston engine.)

15 psi * 7 (area) *.375 (stroke in feet) * 200  * .5 / 33,000 = .1205 Hp Probably about a tenth of a Hp when allowing for friction.

Because steam has 100% torque at 0 rpm the engine will have roughly one horse power compared to an ICE. (roughly ten to one in comparison)

Due to the engine being single cylinder it will not be self-starting and will need a pull rope starter, and it will need a fly wheel to even out the power out curve.

Regards,
Kevin


ps Have you tried the engine on compressed air yet?

kevin
« Last Edit: July 08, 2013, 11:51:25 am by Kevin1632 » Logged

robotmastern
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automaton craftsman extraordinaire


« Reply #13 on: July 09, 2013, 03:48:33 am »

actually the cylinder is a 2x2 and i need to fill my welding tanks before i can get the stud welded on so no i havent tried it yet but i know my cam system works.
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Kevin1632
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Steam breakfast of Champions


« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2013, 07:41:17 am »


The cam lifter is elegant, you might consider putting a nut (plus locking nut) and threaded rod in as the cam follower. That system will allow you to adjust the open time for your steam admission valve.

Aside from that here are a couple of sites that are extraordinary, the SACA site has pepole on the forum who worked with Besler and Doble, the knowledge is strong with them.

http://www.steamautomobile.com/lcc/index.htm

This link is to a set of papers on steam locomotion, the Lamont plant is a great one.

http://www.steamautomobile.com/northea/papers.html

Finally here is a link to my last beasty.... I ended up shearing off the crank shaft...

Spoiler (click to show/hide)


That is a six inch ruler at the bottom

Regards,
Kevin





actually the cylinder is a 2x2 and i need to fill my welding tanks before i can get the stud welded on so no i havent tried it yet but i know my cam system works.
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robotmastern
Snr. Officer
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United States United States


automaton craftsman extraordinaire


« Reply #15 on: July 14, 2013, 01:15:00 am »

thank you, sometimes the simplest solution is the best.
and actually the cam system is for exhaust only and vents the entire up stroke. with the way the valves are positioned the only way to actuate the admission valve is from inside the piston. granted i have considered removing the valve entirely and using a ball valve external to the engine however that would require a lot more work and possibly another cam.
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robotmastern
Snr. Officer
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United States United States


automaton craftsman extraordinaire


« Reply #16 on: August 19, 2013, 12:45:50 am »

so i decided to try and build a rocket stove as the burner, while researching designes i figured that a single tube is not going to be enough for the size of this pot so i was able to modify the basic design to feature 2 tubes
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
however upon testing today i find i am losing more heat to the atmosphere than the stove is providing so i will need to insulate the boiler and posibly encorporate a heat exchanger of some sort and improve ventilation
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