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Author Topic: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~  (Read 34785 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #50 on: June 04, 2013, 05:48:52 pm »

More on tiny obscure towns in Texas and horrendously unhealthy food; it brings to light the migration of foods from Europe into the Americas, as it shows three different approaches to breading meat ranging from the battered and deep fried (Chicken Fried Steak), to the lightly breaded and pan fried (Milanesa)



Chicken-Fried Steak / Wiener Schnitzel / Milanesa / Cotoletta


The Chicken-Fried Steak

This is basically a deep fried battered sheet of pounded /tenderised beef, and it is attributed to variations on Wiener Schnitzel veal dishes brought by German migrants to Texas during the late 19th. C.

This could be considered folkloric in the South of the US.  My only problem with this dish is that it has become a cliche for low-priced food establishments, and it is one way to sell a less-than-tender cut of beef, which is pounded to within quarter-inch of it's life, and therefore, you are not always going to get a good food product.  So finding a good diner is paramount.

Wiki:
Quote

Chicken fried steak (also known as pan-fried steak,[1] CFS or country fried steak) is a breaded cutlet dish consisting of a piece of steak (tenderized cube steak) coated with seasoned flour and pan-fried. It is associated with Southern cuisine. Its name may be due to its similarity in preparation to fried chicken.

Chicken fried steak resembles the Austrian dish Wiener Schnitzel and the Italian-Latin American dish Milanesa, which is a tenderized veal or pork cutlet, coated with flour, eggs, and bread crumbs, and then fried. It is also similar to the recipe for Scottish collops.[1]

The precise origins of the dish are unclear, but many sources attribute its development to German and Austrian immigrants to Texas in the 19th century, who brought recipes for Wiener Schnitzel from Europe to the USA.[1] Lamesa, the seat of Dawson County on the Texas South Plains, claims to be the birthplace of chicken fried steak, and hosts an annual celebration accordingly.[2] John "White Gravy" Neutzling of Bandera in the Texas Hill Country also claims to have invented the dish.[3]

The Virginia Housewife, published in 1838 by Mary Randolph, has a recipe for veal cutlets that is one of the earliest recipes for a food like chicken fried steak. The recipe for what we now know as chicken fried steak was included in many regional cookbooks by the late 19th century.[1] The Oxford English Dictionary's earliest attestation of the term "chicken-fried steak" is from a restaurant advertisement in the 19 June 1914 edition of the Colorado Springs Gazette newspaper.[4]

A 1943 American cookbook recipe for Wiener Schnitzel includes a white salt and pepper cream gravy.[5]

Chicken fried steak is among numerous popular dishes which make up the official state meal of Oklahoma,[6][7] added to the list in 1988.



Chicken Fried Steak (United States)
(Image 2006 (CC2.5) Bloodshedder)


~~~

Wiener Schnitzel (Austria)

Quote
Wiener Schnitzel is a very thin, breaded and deep fried Schnitzel from veal. It belongs to the best known speciality of Viennese cuisine. The Wiener Schnitzel is the national dish of Austria.

The dish is prepared from butterfly cut, about 4 mm thin and lightly hammered veal slices, slightly salted, and rolled in flour, whipped eggs and bread crumbs. The bread crumbs must not be pressed into the meat, so that they stay dry and can be "souffled". Finally the Schnitzel is fried in a good proportion of lard or clarified butter at a temperature from 160 to 170 °C until it is golden yellow. The Schnitzel must swim in the fat, otherwise it will not cook evenly: the fat cools too much and intrudes into the bread crumbs, moistening them. During the frying the Schnitzel is repeatedly slightly tossed around the pan. Also during the frying, fat can be scooped from the pan with a spoon and poured onto the meat. After the underside has become golden yellow, the Schnitzel is turned over.

The designation "Wiener Schnitzel" first appeared in the end of the 19th century, with the first known mention in a cookbook from 1831.[1] In the popular southern German cookbook by Katharina Prato, it was mentioned as eingebröselte Kalbsschnitze.




Image 2006 (CC 2.5) Kobako


~~~

Milanesa (Latin America) and Cotoletta (Italy)

This is a dish available universally throughout Latin America, and a variation on Cottoleta a la Milanese, except the meat is deboned and pounded and is not limited to milk-fed veal.  Honest;y of the three types of breaded meat this is the lightest, since it's just a thin slice of meat, breaded and pan fried

Quote
The milanesa is a common breaded cutlet dish, mostly found in Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay and other Central/South American countries to a lesser extent, where breaded meat fillet preparations are known as a milanesa (In Portuguese, the beef version is called bife à milanesa and the chicken version is called frango à milanesa).

The milanesa was brought to the Southern Cone of South America from Central European immigrants, its name probably reflecting an original Milanese preparation cotoletta alla milanese, which is similar to the Austrian Wiener Schnitzel.[1]

A milanesa consists of a thin slice of beef, chicken, veal, or sometimes pork, and even eggplants or soy. Each slice is dipped into beaten eggs, seasoned with salt, and other condiments according to the cook's taste (like parsley and garlic). Each slice is then dipped in bread crumbs (or occasionally flour) and shallow-fried in oil, one at a time. Some people prefer to use very little oil and then bake them in the oven as a healthier alternative.


Cotoletta

Quote
Cotoletta (from Italian: costoletta = "little rib", because of the rib that remains attached to the meat during and after the cooking) is an Italian word for veal breaded cutlet.

Cotoletta alla milanese (milanese after its place of origin, Milan) is a fried cutlet similar to Wiener schnitzel, but cooked "bone-in". It is fried in clarified butter or olive oil[1] and traditionally uses exclusively milk-fed veal.

Cotoletta a orecchio di elefante ("elephant ear cutlet") is another type of milanese, which uses a thinner but larger cut of meat, and is deboned and tenderized prior to frying, similarly to the American preparation of breaded pork tenderloin. This is the most common cotoletta eaten in Italy in every day life because it is easy and fast to prepare. However, it is not popular with Milanese chefs, because the thin meat produces a strong taste of "fry". In the typical osteria in Milan the first version is much more common.

Cotoletta alla palermitana (palermitana because it takes origin from Palermo, Sicily) is similar to a milanese but the veal is brushed with lard or olive oil instead of butter, and then grilled instead of being deep fried. The breadcrumb is very often mixed with oregano and/or Parmesan cheese, and it can be put on the grill upon a leaf of lemon that gives it a particular Sicilian scent. This cutlet is the only one among its "sisters" (tonkatsu, schnitzel, milanese, American style breaded meat, etc.) that does not have eggs in its breading.

Various breaded meat dishes prepared in Latin America were inspired by the cotoletta and are known as milanesa. In Argentina Milanesa a la napolitana is made similar to the cotoletta with a preparation of cheese and tomato.


A plain Latin American Milanesa
(Image Marcelo Teson (CC 2.0) 2007)


~~~

Texas Best - Chicken Fried Steak (Texas Country Reporter)





« Last Edit: June 10, 2013, 09:04:46 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #51 on: June 08, 2013, 09:33:35 pm »

I think it was mentioned before but not elaborated upon:

Tempura

Tempura is a dish comprised of various long slices or strips of vegetables or seafood that have been battered in a light mixture of wheat flour, eggs, and ice-cold water and then deep fried in peanut oil.  Baking powder, Canola or vegetable oil and starch are also used for more recent versions.

What makes tempura different is that the mixing of the ingredients is done using ice cold water and mixed sparingly to prevent the formation of gluten. Sometimes soda water is used to help keep the batter light, and it is never allowed to brown too much. Lumps of flour are allowed in the batter and actually help in giving Tempura a peculiar lumpy texture.


Quote
Oil temperature is generally kept between 160 and 180 degrees Celsius, depending on the ingredient[citation needed]. To preserve the natural flavor and texture of the ingredients, care is taken not to overcook tempura. Cooking times range between a few seconds for delicate leaf vegetables, to several minutes for thick items or large kaki-age fritters[citation needed].

The bits of batter (known as tenkasu) are scooped out between batches of tempura, so they do not burn and leave a bad flavor in the oil. A small mesh scoop (Ami jakushi) is used for this purpose. Tenkasu are often reserved as ingredients in other dishes or as a topping.



The origin of Tempura is actually attributed to Portuguese Jesuit missionaries in the city of Nagasaki, circa 1549.

From Wiki:
Quote
Origins

The recipe for tempura was introduced to Japan by Portuguese Jesuit missionaries particularly active in the city of Nagasaki also founded by the Portuguese, during the sixteenth century (1549). Portuguese[5] Jesuit,[6] during the same period that panko and such dishes as tonkatsu were also introduced from Portugal. Tokugawa Ieyasu, founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan, reportedly loved tempura[citation needed]. Originally, tempura was a popular food eaten at street venders called 'yatai'(屋台) since the Genroku era. Today, tempura is still a popular side dish at home, and is frequently eaten as a topping at soba stands.


Etymology

The word "tempura", or the technique of dipping fish and vegetables into a batter and frying them, comes from the word "tempora", a Latin word meaning "times", "time period" used by both Spanish and Portuguese missionaries to refer to the Lenten period or Ember Days (ad tempora quadragesimae), Fridays, and other Christian holy days. Ember Days or quattuor tempora refer to holy days when Catholics avoid red meat and instead eat fish or vegetables.[citation needed] The idea that the word "tempura" may have been derived from the Portuguese noun tempero, meaning a condiment or seasoning of any kind, or from the verb temperar, meaning "to season" has not been substantiated.[6] However, the Japanese language could easily have assumed the word "tempero" as is, without changing any vowels as the Portuguese pronunciation in this case is similar to the Japanese.[7] There is still today a dish in Portugal very similar to tempura called peixinhos da horta, "garden fishies."

It is also possible that the Portuguese picked the technique up from Goa which was their colony in India and this could very well be a variation of the pakora.

The term "tempura" is thought to have gained popularity in southern Japan; it became widely used to refer to any sort of food prepared using hot oil, including some already existing Japanese foods. Today, the word "tempura" is also commonly used to refer to satsuma age, a fried fish cake which is made without batter.


Shrimp and vegetable Tempura
(Image Kowloonese, 2004, GNU Free documentation License 1.2)


Portuguese Peixinhos da horta ("Minnows from the garden"), a fried vegetable dish.
(Image Adriao, 2010, GNU Free documentation License 1.2)

A Yatai, a Tempura food stall from the Edo period at the Fukagawa Edo Museum
(Image DryPot, 2011, GNU Free documentation License 1.2)
« Last Edit: June 08, 2013, 09:59:22 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Mercury Wells
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« Reply #52 on: June 09, 2013, 12:51:07 am »

A good old fashioned British staple:- Fish & Chips

Arguements about the origins are hotly disputed btb.   (usually ending up with being charged with asalt & battery) Grin

P.S....Whoever thought of adding cheese on top of chips needs to be keelhauled through a bubbling vat of lard at least once a week as punishment.!  Angry
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« Reply #53 on: June 09, 2013, 01:59:06 am »

Cheese on chips is wrong, but gravy on french fries is excellent.
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« Reply #54 on: June 09, 2013, 02:07:09 am »

A good old fashioned British staple:- Fish & Chips

Arguements about the origins are hotly disputed btb.   (usually ending up with being charged with asalt & battery) Grin

P.S....Whoever thought of adding cheese on top of chips needs to be keelhauled through a bubbling vat of lard at least once a week as punishment.!  Angry


It was already covered  Wink (see first page)

JW
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« Reply #55 on: June 09, 2013, 02:50:21 am »

I'm a veggie, so I must say much of this is alien to me! But I love falafel and spring rolls and samosas and bhajis and pakora.

Really hungry now damn it =P

Here in the South we eat fried veggies too (and fry them in vegetable oil as well). My family ate plenty of fried okra, squash, and potatoes when I was growing up. The okra and squash were cut into slices, breaded, and fried. The potatoes were cut into pieces and simply fried in oil with a little of chopped/sliced onion for flavor.

And I also agree with you, I'm hungry now too! Cheesy
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« Reply #56 on: June 09, 2013, 02:59:19 am »

Oh! the Humanity!
 OM NOMNOM NOM
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« Reply #57 on: June 09, 2013, 04:40:57 am »

A good old fashioned British staple:- Fish & Chips

Arguements about the origins are hotly disputed btb.   (usually ending up with being charged with asalt & battery) Grin

P.S....Whoever thought of adding cheese on top of chips needs to be keelhauled through a bubbling vat of lard at least once a week as punishment.!  Angry


It was already covered  Wink (see first page)

JW


Oh bugger! sorry old chap. I wasn't paying attention...*Does the honourable thing... & decapitates ones self with a 30lb Cod*
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« Reply #58 on: June 09, 2013, 04:50:19 am »

A good old fashioned British staple:- Fish & Chips

Arguements about the origins are hotly disputed btb.   (usually ending up with being charged with asalt & battery) Grin

P.S....Whoever thought of adding cheese on top of chips needs to be keelhauled through a bubbling vat of lard at least once a week as punishment.!  Angry


It was already covered  Wink (see first page)

JW


Oh bugger! sorry old chap. I wasn't paying attention...*Does the honourable thing... & decapitates ones self with a 30lb Cod*



Going all Japanese on me eh? Don't! Leave the cod alone- besides he has no Shinjū pact with you (at least not between a man and a fish!).  What has he done to you anyway?

The penalty instead is finding another fried food...
« Last Edit: June 09, 2013, 04:56:12 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #59 on: June 09, 2013, 06:30:59 am »

One of these days, I shall go utterly mad, and do a tempura-battered squid-ring calamari, paired with tempura-battered leek rings, so as to look identical to the diner.

If the madness is complete, no doubt from delving into ancient arcane tomes of unspeakable  origin, they will be served New Orleans 'po-boy' style, on a sauced piece of baguette, with a similarly- tempura fried halved squid tube as extended  "wings", tempura-fried chives as tentacles, and pimento-stuffed olive "eyes"  - The Kraken Po-Boy Sandwich Smiley   (and, yes, I'm helping a friend develop a restaurant menu for a site that was an old steam-powered flour mill)
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« Reply #60 on: June 09, 2013, 07:42:12 am »

One of these days, I shall go utterly mad, and do a tempura-battered squid-ring calamari, paired with tempura-battered leek rings, so as to look identical to the diner.

If the madness is complete, no doubt from delving into ancient arcane tomes of unspeakable  origin, they will be served New Orleans 'po-boy' style, on a sauced piece of baguette, with a similarly- tempura fried halved squid tube as extended  "wings", tempura-fried chives as tentacles, and pimento-stuffed olive "eyes"  - The Kraken Po-Boy Sandwich Smiley   (and, yes, I'm helping a friend develop a restaurant menu for a site that was an old steam-powered flour mill)


Sounds splendid to me...  Similar to The Cthulhu Muffuletta sandwich famously dreamed up by H.P. Lovecraft himself while staying in New Orleans, during a long walk along Lafayette Cemetery on St. Charles Ave.

~ ~ ~

Naturally we have forgotten that classic American:  

Southern Fried Chicken / Fried Chicken

Quote
Fried chicken (also referred to as Southern fried chicken) is a dish consisting of chicken pieces usually from broiler chickens which have been floured or battered and then pan-fried, deep fried, or pressure fried. The breading adds a crisp coating or crust to the exterior. What separates fried chicken from other fried forms of chicken is that generally the chicken is cut at the joints and the bones and skin are left intact. Crisp well-seasoned skin, rendered of excess fat, is a hallmark of well made fried chicken.


Background
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

A fried chicken drumstick (this is not the best photo I've seen BTW - but I'm too tired to scour the interwebs now)
(Image DougsTech 2006 Creative Commons 3.0 License)



~ ~ ~

And from the horrible tome of the Necronomicon, we have another combination, as prophesied by the Old Ones to precede the fall of mankind.  Definitely nor traditional not folkloric American, but interesting pairing:  Fried Chicken and Doughnuts: http://screen.yahoo.com/chicken-donuts-mismatch-genius-100000793.html

 

« Last Edit: June 09, 2013, 09:09:21 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #61 on: June 09, 2013, 10:50:39 pm »

Not to be forgotten: the idiosyncratically West-Coast pairing of chicken and waffles, as served at Roscoe's.
I am not making that up—http://www.roscoeschickenandwaffles.com/
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« Reply #62 on: June 10, 2013, 09:52:22 am »

P.S....Whoever thought of adding cheese on top of chips needs to be keelhauled through a bubbling vat of lard at least once a week as punishment.!  Angry

Well, I'm not sure. I mean on melted on takeaway 'American style chips' (I suppose french fries would be the correct term) it can work quite nicely, but not on the proper British chipped spud like yo find in your humble local chippy!!! Angry Salt and vinegar (and maybe gravy and or chip spice if you're that way inclined) is the only way to season proper chips!
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« Reply #63 on: June 10, 2013, 07:23:53 pm »

Another American Classic:

The Patty Melt


Basically a variation on the Melt (US) / Toastie (UK) Sandwich. this is for all practical purposes a hamburger sandwich, and yes it counts as a fried food because it consists of a fried hamburger patty, pieces of sautéed or grilled onions and Cheddar or Swiss cheese between two slices of (traditionally rye) bread.  The whole sandwich is then pan-fried in butter on both sides until the cheese melts.


A Patty Melt Sandwich
(Image 2007 pointnshoot from Oakland, California, USAm Creative Commons 2.0 Lic.)
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« Reply #64 on: June 10, 2013, 08:24:59 pm »

*snip*

There`s korokke, a fried..potato...thing....that`s really good. It often comes with a sauce, but you can get it as it is too. They sold them at my uni in Kyoto for 36 yen each (which was, well, a couple of cents in euro), so I ate them everyday in the short break.



*snip*

Other fried foods include but are not limited to karaage (fried chicken), tonkatsu (pork), inarizushi (fried tofu poach filled with rice), and tofu.

*snip*


At a couple of cents of Euro, how can they be so cheap?  As poor as I am right now I'm sure I would also be one buying these every day  Grin

~~~

Tonkatsu

The Tonkatsu was in fact considered a Japanese version of Western or Western-influenced food, generally known as Yōshoku.  

The present day Tonkatsu is a deep-fried pork cutlet, either a pork fillet (ヒレ, hire) or pork loin (ロース, rōsu).  Prior to deep frying, the pork is salted, peppered, dredged lightly in flour, dipped into beaten egg and then coated with panko (bread crumbs).

According to Wiki it was originally known as Katsuretsu (cutlet), or "katsu" for short, however and the main ingredient was not pork but rather beef, and it is said top have been invented at the Rengatei restaurant in 1899. So clearly it belongs to the Meiji period (and hence qualifies as Victorian Era / Steampunk-compatible IMHO).  The term Tonkatsu was not used until the 1930's



Variations and presentation: from Wiki
Quote
Tonkatsu is generally served with shredded cabbage.[2] It is most commonly eaten with a type of thick Worcestershire sauce called tonkatsu sauce or simply sōsu (sauce), karashi (mustard) and perhaps a slice of lemon. It is usually served with rice, miso soup and tsukemono and eaten with chopsticks. It may also be served with ponzu and grated daikon instead of tonkatsu sauce.

Katsu Sando - literally Katsu Sandwich  Cheesy

Chicken katsu (チキンカツ), which uses chicken instead, often appears in Hawaiian plate lunches.
Menchi katsu (メンチカツ) or Minchi Katsu (ミンチカツ mince Katsu), is a minced meat patty, breaded and deep fried.
Hamu katsu (ハムカツ ham katsu), a similar dish made from ham, is usually considered a budget alternative to tonkatsu.
Gyū katsu (牛カツ beef katsu), also known as bīfu katsu, is popular in the Kansai region around Osaka and Kobe.



Katsu-sando

« Last Edit: June 10, 2013, 08:59:53 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #65 on: June 14, 2013, 03:02:57 pm »

This recently went up on Instructables: deep-fried It's-It. Since this involves a traditional frozen snack, the author uses liquid nitrogen to make the It's-It cold enough to still be frozen after frying.
http://www.instructables.com/id/Deep-Fried-Its-It/
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« Reply #66 on: June 25, 2013, 11:05:04 pm »

Here is one that may nistify our brothers from the other side of the Atlantic (and Pacific):

Fried Green Tomatoes

A traditional dish made from unripened, green tomatoes in the South of the United States.

The tomatoes are sliced to about 1/4inch (6mm) in thickness dipped in buttermilk or egg wash and then coated with cornmeal (maize) and seasoned with salt and pepper,   The slices are then fried in a pan with bacon fat for a few minutes each side, or until golden brown.



Three recipes from New Orleans: Fried Green Tomatoes with Shrimp Remoulade, Fried Green Tomatoes with Fresh Mozzarella and Tomato Sauce, and Fried Green Tomato Eggs Benedict (!)
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5692200
« Last Edit: June 25, 2013, 11:09:05 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #67 on: June 27, 2013, 05:12:49 pm »

J. Wilhelm - You have me craving fried green tomatoes now.  Not easy to find in Alaska since tomatoes do not grow here particularly well (except the Fairbanks hotsprings). 

http://southerngalscook.com/recipes/pies-and-cakes/its-so-easy-fried-apple-pies/  One to try at home although liver/onion/mushroom filling sounds better today. 

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« Reply #68 on: June 27, 2013, 05:51:06 pm »

I didn't get a picture but when I was I. Africa. Hippopotamus Bacon


Bloody deliscious

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« Reply #69 on: June 27, 2013, 09:52:18 pm »

I am afraid that I have to dissent from some of the above opinions: a lot of those photos look actually disgusting and off putting.

I do like decent fish and chips: the fish should be thick white juicy flakes, of cod, haddock or coley, in a crisp batter freshly fried.

Other local delicacies here (Glasgow) all deep fried in batter
Haggis
Pizza
Mars bars
Frankfurters
Black pudding

I cannot eat any of them - all disgusting.

On the sweet fried foods: Belgian or Dutch waffles with whipped cream are my top favourite. I think they call them Schlagroomwaffle
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« Reply #70 on: June 28, 2013, 12:57:52 am »

I am afraid that I have to dissent from some of the above opinions: a lot of those photos look actually disgusting and off putting.

I do like decent fish and chips: the fish should be thick white juicy flakes, of cod, haddock or coley, in a crisp batter freshly fried.

Other local delicacies here (Glasgow) all deep fried in batter
Haggis
Pizza
Mars bars
Frankfurters
Black pudding

I cannot eat any of them - all disgusting.

On the sweet fried foods: Belgian or Dutch waffles with whipped cream are my top favourite. I think they call them Schlagroomwaffle




Deep fried haggis - I have a new food quest.   Wink

Is deep frying things a recent Scottish trend or a long standing tradition like the SE US? 
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« Reply #71 on: June 28, 2013, 09:57:34 pm »

Deep frying food was originally a street food thing. There is somewhere a wonderful little book, possibly someone's thesis, on the history of fish and chips.

Initially, they were sold separately. Fried potatoes  but not in the chips/french fries stick form. Fried fish was also sold on its own. By the time of the first world war they were an established partneship and the ingredients were protected from rationing so that local fish and chip shops could produce food quickly for housewives working in factories. Many poorer homes here didnt have much in the way of cooking facilities and deep frying of good fresh ingredients was considered healthier food than what poor people often subsisted on.
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« Reply #72 on: June 28, 2013, 10:30:39 pm »

I keep forgetting that whole food rationing thing.  It seems to have influenced a number of aspects of British customs.



Am I just missing the infamous "bloomin onion" here?  I have seen these outside of steak house chains as street festival foods too.  Fortunately for me no one locally seems to have picked up the habit of serving these. 

When I was in college (and Latin was not considered a dead language yet  Wink) "baked onions" were somewhat in vogue because they were supposedly Elizabethan street food and apparently (from found clay fragments) eaten in the Globe theatre.   First you stew the whole onion in chicken broth until it begins to open a little then you stuff little pieces of chicken or bacon in the petals, wrap them in clay (or a stiff dough) then bake them until the shell is hard.  Patrons would crack them open like an egg and pull out the petals.   Surprisingly tasty even to some people who did not think that they liked onions. 
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« Reply #73 on: June 29, 2013, 03:05:45 am »

One of my a time favorites are funnel cakes.

Basically a light batter drizzled inside a cake ring in hot oil and when it is finished covered in powered sugar and some times a fruit topping.
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« Reply #74 on: July 01, 2013, 12:45:37 am »

I am afraid that I have to dissent from some of the above opinions: a lot of those photos look actually disgusting and off putting.

I do like decent fish and chips: the fish should be thick white juicy flakes, of cod, haddock or coley, in a crisp batter freshly fried.

Other local delicacies here (Glasgow) all deep fried in batter
Haggis
Pizza
Mars bars
Frankfurters
Black pudding

I cannot eat any of them - all disgusting.

On the sweet fried foods: Belgian or Dutch waffles with whipped cream are my top favourite. I think they call them Schlagroomwaffle


Beauty is in the eye of the beholder....

A good number of American fried foods feature corn (maize) flour batter instead of wheat flour (e.g. Fried Green Tomatoes).  The texture and taste can be quite different.  If a food is very greasy to begin with, then deep frying it enters the realm of "excess" for me.

Fried Mars bars enter the category of "novelty" in my opinion, same as fried Coca Cola and such items.  I tend to respect more culturally grounded items such as Fish and Chips (UK), Tempura (Japan), Beignets (USA) and Mexican Chicharrones, which not only are healthier, but whose origin in the community can be identified.  Even Pommes Frites (French Fries) have an identifiable history.  A pizza in the shape of an ice-cream cone just doesn't do it for me  Tongue  Thankfully that trend never caught on in the US.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2013, 12:47:24 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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