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Author Topic: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~  (Read 50813 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #400 on: April 02, 2021, 05:43:45 am »

Not directly discussing one fried dish, but rather discussing a dish with a certain number of ingredients, many of which are typically fried.

I present to you "Tacography" A visual representation of Mexico's favorite taco classified by filling - All tacos are made from soft rolled maize tortillas unless otherwise noted. Northern Mexican styled tacos will be folded in half and deep fried or alternatively soft and made from wheat flour tortillas. North American equivalents made with hard tortilla chip shells do not merit any mention (ie fake tacos),


We've discussed how Tacos "al Pastor" ("shepherd style") are derived from Shawarma, the vertical rotisserie style of cooking brought by Lebanese migrants in Mexico. It just happens that, at a whopping 22% of the surveyed response, "al Pastor" tacos lead the chart as being the most popular taco filling in Mexico with or without pineapple.

After that "Bistec" (Beef Steak) at 13% of voter's reference is the second most popular filling, closely followed 3th place at 11% by Tacos de Carne Asada (Grilled Steak Tacos),

The fourth place goes to Tacos "al Sudadero" ("sweated tacos") which means beef is cooked slowly, Confit style, in other words, beef fried in beef tallow.  Tacos de Sudadero garnish 8% of the vote from taco aficionados.

Carnitas ("Little meats") is filled with pork Confit, similar to Sudadero, but this time shredded pork, slowly cooked in lard. Tacos de de Carnitas takes 7 % of the vote.

The 6th place goes to "Tacos de Res" plain beef tacos - cooking method is unspecified (need more info?)

Only 3% of the votes goes to "Tacos de Guisado" ("Stew Tacos"), in equal proportion to "Tacos de Barbacoa" (Barbecue Tacos")

The last 6 spots in the chart, equally spaced at only 2% go to Tacos de Pollo (Chicken Tacos), Tacos de Cabeza (hog head or cow head rendered meat tacos), Tacos de Frijoles y Arroz (Beans and Rice Tacos), Tacos de Tripa (Tripe/Offal Tacos), Tacos de Chicharron (Pork Rind Tacos), and Tacos de Cecina (dried and salted meat tacos)

An additional 3% is not preference for filling, but rather presentation. At 3% diners preferred "Tacos Dorados" ("Golden Tacos") Also known as "Flautas" ("Flutes") or "Taquitos" in the United States. Basically tightly rolled tacos pan or deep fried in oil until crispy.

The most popular salsa is Salsa Verde ("Green Sauce" an Aztec recipe with Tomatillo and Green Chile Peppers) which comfortably takes 49 % of the voter's preference over 33% for Salsa Roja ("Red Sauce" which is based on tomato and red Chile Peppers).



« Last Edit: April 02, 2021, 05:59:08 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #401 on: April 03, 2021, 09:26:39 pm »

So refritos are never used in Mexican tacos? Having been making and eating them for the last 40 years (since I became vegetarian), I find this a bit bizarre.

But not quite as bizarre as the popularity of pineapple in meat ones. Hopefully it's as contentious as having pineapple on pizzas.
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« Reply #402 on: April 04, 2021, 12:47:28 am »

So refritos are never used in Mexican tacos? Having been making and eating them for the last 40 years (since I became vegetarian), I find this a bit bizarre.

But not quite as bizarre as the popularity of pineapple in meat ones. Hopefully it's as contentious as having pineapple on pizzas.

Well most certainly they are. When you say Refritos (refried), I'm guessing you mean beans as in Tacos de Frijoles Refritos (refried bean tacos). That would enter the category of Tacos de Frijoles y Arroz (2% of survey preference); but beans are a much better side dish rather than a filling in a taco. The only exception to using beans as a filling would be in "Tostadas" and their much larger cousins from Oaxaca "Tlayudas" (basically a "Mexican Pizza"), or the fluffy maize "Sopes" (thick maize flat bread, like a Tortilla but fatter), where the refried beans are a base, sort of like the way tomato sauce and cheese are the base for a Pizza.

Otherwise, if you say "Tacos de Res con Frijoles Refritos y Arroz" (beef tacos with a side of refried beans and rice), that makes a lot more sense. That's pretty much the stereotypical taco dish copied over and over in the United States (when they do it right with soft maize tortillas and no lettuce /cabbage or processed American cheese which is not Mexican).

Sope with red sauce


Tlayuda


Tostadas





BTW for our audience, "Refrito" pretty much means that the beans are mashed and then literally fried on the pan again. Their place is mostly as a breakfast side dish.

I would suggest that you try fried eggs with red salsa on top and a side of refried beans (this is called Huevos Rancheros) with maize Tortillas. The Tortilla can be treated as bread, rolled up and lightly salted. Or alternatively, a much better presentation is to place a couple of lightly fried and salted Tortillas as a base over which you lay the fried eggs and beans and then cover the whole thing with red salsa. Garnish with Feta cheese (similar to a number of salty Mexican cheeses, or shredded Manchego or even Baby Swiss cheese (laughing cow ok). Use fork and knife. Mingle ingredients at your leisure while you eat.  Grin

Huevo(s) Rancheros is basically an egg Tostada.
(You can probably make it look a lot better than this picture. I couldn't find another one)
« Last Edit: April 04, 2021, 06:53:49 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #403 on: April 07, 2021, 08:49:37 am »

So refritos are never used in Mexican tacos? Having been making and eating them for the last 40 years (since I became vegetarian), I find this a bit bizarre.

But not quite as bizarre as the popularity of pineapple in meat ones. Hopefully it's as contentious as having pineapple on pizzas.

Well most certainly they are. When you say Refritos (refried), I'm guessing you mean beans as in Tacos de Frijoles Refritos (refried bean tacos). That would enter the category of Tacos de Frijoles y Arroz (2% of survey preference); but beans are a much better side dish rather than a filling in a taco. The only exception to using beans as a filling would be in "Tostadas" and their much larger cousins from Oaxaca "Tlayudas" (basically a "Mexican Pizza"), or the fluffy maize "Sopes" (thick maize flat bread, like a Tortilla but fatter), where the refried beans are a base, sort of like the way tomato sauce and cheese are the base for a Pizza.

Otherwise, if you say "Tacos de Res con Frijoles Refritos y Arroz" (beef tacos with a side of refried beans and rice), that makes a lot more sense. That's pretty much the stereotypical taco dish copied over and over in the United States (when they do it right with soft maize tortillas and no lettuce /cabbage or processed American cheese which is not Mexican).

Sope with red sauce


Tlayuda


Tostadas





BTW for our audience, "Refrito" pretty much means that the beans are mashed and then literally fried on the pan again. Their place is mostly as a breakfast side dish.

I would suggest that you try fried eggs with red salsa on top and a side of refried beans (this is called Huevos Rancheros) with maize Tortillas. The Tortilla can be treated as bread, rolled up and lightly salted. Or alternatively, a much better presentation is to place a couple of lightly fried and salted Tortillas as a base over which you lay the fried eggs and beans and then cover the whole thing with red salsa. Garnish with Feta cheese (similar to a number of salty Mexican cheeses, or shredded Manchego or even Baby Swiss cheese (laughing cow ok). Use fork and knife. Mingle ingredients at your leisure while you eat.  Grin

Huevo(s) Rancheros is basically an egg Tostada.
(You can probably make it look a lot better than this picture. I couldn't find another one)

 There was a moment in time , in New Zealand a few years back, when huevo rancheros  were  a fashionable  morning cafe serve. Recipes were plastered everywhere for the trendy set to try at home. Most were based on toast, fried egg, tomato sauce and tinned baked beans , dabbed with grated cheese or sourcream . Possibly more heavo rancho. They must have subsided in popularity. I hadn't heard of the dish in years. The cafe  herd have been attacking eggs benedict with a vengeance, salmon and a bun, drowning it in a thick cheese sauce.

 Mexicans must have have been making Huevo Rancheros wrong for centuries. Here is the real recipe
for it from the local NZ supermarket chain.

https://www.newworld.co.nz/recipes/flavours-of-the-world/huevos-rancheros









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« Reply #404 on: April 07, 2021, 09:27:58 am »

SNIP

 There was a moment in time , in New Zealand a few years back, when huevo rancheros  were  a fashionable  morning cafe serve. Recipes were plastered everywhere for the trendy set to try at home. Most were based on toast, fried egg, tomato sauce and tinned baked beans , dabbed with grated cheese or sourcream . Possibly more heavo rancho. They must have subsided in popularity. I hadn't heard of the dish in years. The cafe  herd have been attacking eggs benedict with a vengeance, salmon and a bun, drowning it in a thick cheese sauce.

 Mexicans must have have been making Huevo Rancheros wrong for centuries. Here is the real recipe
for it from the local NZ supermarket chain.

https://www.newworld.co.nz/recipes/flavours-of-the-world/huevos-rancheros


So there's nothing like reading Shakespeare's Hamlet in the original Klingon, eh?

Ha ha! That's insane. And a shame. Not that I recommend using Wikipedia for references or doing homework, but it takes approximately 2 seconds online to dispel the Antipoedian version of Huevos Rancheros - in English, not Klingon.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huevos_rancheros

BTW I have no clue how old the recipe for Huevos Rancheros is. I doubt that the formalized recipe existed before the 19th century. If nothing else, not many dishes anywhere in the Americas were likely to be found in recipe books. To me it sounds (just guessing on the style of the presentation) as very likely a late 19th century or even early 20th century dish. Food is fleeting like that.

From conversations over Tweeter with a retired octogenarian news anchor from Mexico, I've learned about a number of dishes I had never heard of 40 years ago. Highly localized dishes that only people from that region would know, and not only that, but historically very recent dishes. Not worthy of mention in historical books. One such dish was the meatballs in Chipotle peppers Adobo (spicy barbecue sauce) with beans. Which I had posted elsewhere in brassgoggles.co.uk. You can only find that in the city where this gentleman was born. It's most likely 20th century street food only to be found in the satellite city of Toluca 30 miles from Mexico City.

Meatball Stew in Chipotle Pepper Barbecue Sauce with beans (Adobo)


Hot as the lava from Mauna Kea. And here's another dish he described yesterday: pork sausage in salsa verde with diced potatoes.

Pork Sausage in Salsa Verde


I can't imagine eating salsa verde like if it was soup!! Those people are CRAZY! I'm dying to try it, though. Probably as hot as venusian sulfuric acid rain. Both dishes look very spicy and very good for cold climes. Suitable for a city at the foot of the mighty Xinantecatl. But I'm under no ilusion that they could be very old dishes. The region became famous in the 19th and 20th century for their cattle farming and meat processing. The dishes involving sausage and ground meat are a product of that industry.

Valley in the "Nevado de Toluca" (Xinantecatl) National Park

« Last Edit: April 07, 2021, 10:13:50 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #405 on: April 07, 2021, 09:59:05 am »


New Zealand is becoming a tad more adventurous and cosmopolitan with it's food tastes and product options. Coconut is one of the few palms and crops that doesn't grow here naturally. With an increase in immigration from the Asian and African continents , coconut flavours and recipes are reaching the main stream. New business innovation in the Pacific Islands has made coconut processing a growth industry. 


That crumb looks quite nice - I wonder if my local supermarket could source it? Might leave that question until the new owners take over in March, I've already had my share of products got in just for me!!


Too extreme a latitude to grow coconuts? At 40 degrees from the Equator roughly its the equivalen of Virginia, Colorado Nevada in the US and Portugal, Spain, Italy in Europe. Not very high actually.

New Zealand is to cold to grow coconut palms. Possibly as the climate change brings the temperature up they may grow here. Banana is not successful. Rice doesn't grow either. Potatoes grow readily. Just as well most of us are of Celtic descent. [Read  that both ways].

 It has just has occured to me  that most food staples for human consumption in NZ, for Polynesian, Caucasian or Asian  are not native  flora or fauna. They are species  introduced by Maori , European and Great British immigrants. There are no native mammals here.  
 
https://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/qa-all-you-needed-to-know-about-the-humble-coconut/4GOOLKCIZU67KLJZDXGMSHYRRY/

https://teara.govt.nz/en/nga-tupu-mai-i-hawaiki-plants-from-polynesia/page-1

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« Reply #406 on: April 07, 2021, 10:06:49 am »


New Zealand is becoming a tad more adventurous and cosmopolitan with it's food tastes and product options. Coconut is one of the few palms and crops that doesn't grow here naturally. With an increase in immigration from the Asian and African continents , coconut flavours and recipes are reaching the main stream. New business innovation in the Pacific Islands has made coconut processing a growth industry. 


That crumb looks quite nice - I wonder if my local supermarket could source it? Might leave that question until the new owners take over in March, I've already had my share of products got in just for me!!


Too extreme a latitude to grow coconuts? At 40 degrees from the Equator roughly its the equivalen of Virginia, Colorado Nevada in the US and Portugal, Spain, Italy in Europe. Not very high actually.

New Zealand is to cold to grow coconut palms. Possibly as the climate change brings the temperature up they may grow here. Banana is not successful. Rice doesn't grow either. Potatoes grow readily. Just as well most of us are of Celtic descent. [Read  that both ways].

 It has just has occured to me  that most food staples for human consumption in NZ, for Polynesian, Caucasian or Asian  are not native  flora or fauna. They are species  introduced by Maori , European and Great British immigrants. There are no native mammals here.  
 
https://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/qa-all-you-needed-to-know-about-the-humble-coconut/4GOOLKCIZU67KLJZDXGMSHYRRY/

https://teara.govt.nz/en/nga-tupu-mai-i-hawaiki-plants-from-polynesia/page-1



Food changes very quickly. Humans adapt in decades if not less to new foods. The Columbian Exchange messed up all traditional food distribution in the planet. You have Africans eating a root from Brazil (Casava). Mexicans eating fruit from Southeast Asia (Mangoes). Indians eating spices from Mexico (Chili Peppers). Pork being a staple in Hawaii.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #407 on: April 07, 2021, 10:32:36 am »

SNIP



So there's nothing like reading Shakespeare's Hamlet in the original Klingon, eh?

Ha ha! That's insane. And a shame. Not that I recommend using Wikipedia for references or doing homework, but it takes approximately 2 seconds online to dispel the Antipoedian version of Huevos Rancheros - in English, not Klingon.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huevos_rancheros

BTW I have no clue how old the recipe for Huevos Rancheros is. I doubt that the formalized recipe existed before the 19th century. If nothing else, not many dishes anywhere in the Americas were likely to be found in recipe books. To me it sounds (just guessing on the style of the presentation) as very likely a late 19th century or even early 20th century dish. Food is fleeting like that.

From conversations over Tweeter with a retired octogenarian news anchor from Mexico, I've learned about a number of dishes I had never heard of 40 years ago. Highly localized dishes that only people from that region would know, and not only that, but historically very recent dishes. Not worthy of mention in historical books. One such dish was the meatballs in Chipotle peppers Adobo (spicy barbecue sauce) with beans. Which I had posted elsewhere in brassgoggles.co.uk. You can only find that in the city where this gentleman was born. It's most likely 20th century street food only to be found in the satellite city of Toluca 30 miles from Mexico City.

Meatball Stew in Chipotle Pepper Barbecue Sauce with beans (Adobo)


Hot as the lava from Mauna Kea. And here's another dish he described yesterday: pork sausage in salsa verde with diced potatoes.

Pork Sausage in Salsa Verde


I can't imagine eating salsa verde like if it was soup!! Those people are CRAZY! I'm dying to try it, though. Probably as hot as venusian sulfuric acid rain. Both dishes look very spicy and very good for cold climes. Suitable for a city at the foot of the mighty Xinantecatl. But I'm under no ilusion that they could be very old dishes. The region became famous in the 19th and 20th century for their cattle farming and meat processing. The dishes involving sausage and ground meat are a product of that industry.

Valley in the "Nevado de Toluca" (Xinantecatl) National Park


 Those Mexican  meals look flavoursome and hearty.  They would definitely keep the airways clear and stick to ribs. They are thoughisding a key ingredient



 The recipes you mention and their other local alternatives with their use of meat balls and sausages, are likely to be relatively modern and have a post Columbian
Spanish colonial influence.   

Though as Wikipedia university will tell you, neither meat balls and  sausages [nor pizza] are a Spanish or Italian invention. They all have their origin in the Middle East and  came  to the Mediterranean with the conquering Arabs. Which could be why they are so moreish ha ha ha

 
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« Reply #408 on: April 07, 2021, 07:50:36 pm »


SNIP

The recipes you mention and their other local alternatives with their use of meat balls and sausages, are likely to be relatively modern and have a post Columbian
Spanish colonial influence.    

Though as Wikipedia university will tell you, neither meat balls and  sausages [nor pizza] are a Spanish or Italian invention. They all have their origin in the Middle East and  came  to the Mediterranean with the conquering Arabs. Which could be why they are so moreish ha ha ha

 

I know, as with Pasta originating in the Far East most likely. These foods just became very convenient forms by the middle ages. When people ask me about the food influence from Spain in Mexico I like to append the term "Medieval European" to the foods brought into the Americas, because it was (for them) the 700 year old meshing of Middle Eastern (rice, chickpeas, spices) influence on post Roman and Germanic food (pork, citrus fruits, grapes and wheat wine) in Spain. The path from Rome to the Americas is a 2000 year old food saga.

Quote
They are thoughisding a key ingredient

Not exactly. Tomato is one of the ingredients in the meatball dish. I use a whole can of crushed tomatoes with garlic and olive oil to dilute one 4 Oz can of Chipotle peppers in Adobo barbecue sauce for two pounds of meatballs (and the dish is still hot after that!). The tomatoes came from Central Mexico around 500 BC, about 1200 years before the Aztec settled in the Valley of Mexico, but the Aztec called them "Xitomatl" (pronounced "she-toh-mah-tl") in Nahuatl. Today in Mexican Spanish it's spelled "Jitomate" (pronounced "he-toh-mah-teh" ) but that's the same as the Spanish word "Tomate," which is the origin of the word. They're specifically Mesoamerican and South American in origin. No tomatoes in the Old World before Hernan Cortez.

Also the green sauce on the sausage dish has Tomatillos as a main ingredient. The Tomatillo is Tomato's little brother, looks like a small green tomato with a paper-like cover like an onion would have.

Xitomatl / Jitomate / Tomato


Tomatillos

« Last Edit: April 07, 2021, 08:40:03 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #409 on: April 07, 2021, 08:52:18 pm »


SNIP

The recipes you mention and their other local alternatives with their use of meat balls and sausages, are likely to be relatively modern and have a post Columbian
Spanish colonial influence.    

Though as Wikipedia university will tell you, neither meat balls and  sausages [nor pizza] are a Spanish or Italian invention. They all have their origin in the Middle East and  came  to the Mediterranean with the conquering Arabs. Which could be why they are so moreish ha ha ha

 

I know, as with Pasta originating in the Far East most likely. These foods just became very convenient forms by the middle ages. When people ask me about the food influence from Spain in Mexico I like to append the term "Medieval European" to the foods brought into the Americas, because it was (for them) the 700 year old meshing of Middle Eastern (rice, chickpeas, spices) influence on post Roman and Germanic food (pork, citrus fruits, grapes and wheat wine) in Spain. The path from Rome to the Americas is a 2000 year old food saga.

Quote
They are thoughisding a key ingredient

Not exactly. Tomato is one of the ingredients in the meatball dish. I use a whole can of crushed tomatoes with garlic and olive oil to dilute one 4 Oz can of Chipotle peppers in Adobo barbecue sauce for two pounds of meatballs (and the dish is still hot after that!). The tomatoes came from the land of the Aztec. They're specifically Mesoamerican in origin. No tomatoes in the Old World before Hernan Cortez.

Also the green sauce has Tomatillos as a main ingredient. The Tomatillo is Tomato's little brother, looks like a small green tomato with a paper-like cover like an onion would have.

 Just as what we now consider traditional cuisine of the Asian, Indian, British, European or Antipodean cultures etc  rely heavily on  foods from the Americas. Including the ubiquitous NZ / Kiwi  staple ingredient splashed in everything,  tomato sauce.

 Capsicum varieties, tomato, potato, corn, pumpkin and other  squash cultivars [cucumber, courgette and melons]),  pineapple, peanuts, passion fruit,  chocolate , cashews, beans , avacado , vanilla, common berries

 Generally a long list of what the world eats today on a regular basis  and other various spices, herbs, luxury foods that we take forgranted  and associate with fancy foreign  foods. It's a whole new world of cooking .
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« Reply #410 on: April 08, 2021, 05:00:32 am »


SNIP

The recipes you mention and their other local alternatives with their use of meat balls and sausages, are likely to be relatively modern and have a post Columbian
Spanish colonial influence.    

Though as Wikipedia university will tell you, neither meat balls and  sausages [nor pizza] are a Spanish or Italian invention. They all have their origin in the Middle East and  came  to the Mediterranean with the conquering Arabs. Which could be why they are so moreish ha ha ha

 

I know, as with Pasta originating in the Far East most likely. These foods just became very convenient forms by the middle ages. When people ask me about the food influence from Spain in Mexico I like to append the term "Medieval European" to the foods brought into the Americas, because it was (for them) the 700 year old meshing of Middle Eastern (rice, chickpeas, spices) influence on post Roman and Germanic food (pork, citrus fruits, grapes and wheat wine) in Spain. The path from Rome to the Americas is a 2000 year old food saga.

Quote
They are thoughisding a key ingredient

Not exactly. Tomato is one of the ingredients in the meatball dish. I use a whole can of crushed tomatoes with garlic and olive oil to dilute one 4 Oz can of Chipotle peppers in Adobo barbecue sauce for two pounds of meatballs (and the dish is still hot after that!). The tomatoes came from the land of the Aztec. They're specifically Mesoamerican in origin. No tomatoes in the Old World before Hernan Cortez.

Also the green sauce has Tomatillos as a main ingredient. The Tomatillo is Tomato's little brother, looks like a small green tomato with a paper-like cover like an onion would have.

 Just as what we now consider traditional cuisine of the Asian, Indian, British, European or Antipodean cultures etc  rely heavily on  foods from the Americas. Including the ubiquitous NZ / Kiwi  staple ingredient splashed in everything,  tomato sauce.

 Capsicum varieties, tomato, potato, corn, pumpkin and other  squash cultivars [cucumber, courgette and melons]),  pineapple, peanuts, passion fruit,  chocolate , cashews, beans , avacado , vanilla, common berries

 Generally a long list of what the world eats today on a regular basis  and other various spices, herbs, luxury foods that we take forgranted  and associate with fancy foreign  foods. It's a whole new world of cooking .

We tend to think of the cuisine from one country or another as having been made to a particular recipe using particular foods for centuries, when in fact all countries have an evolving cuisine which will continue to evolve right up to the moment we find some "superfood" on some distant planet which will be all the craze until the next discovery. I would just like to see baked beans vanish from the culinary world. How can anyone put those slimy, degusting things in their mouth? 
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« Reply #411 on: April 08, 2021, 05:39:43 am »

I would just like to see baked beans vanish from the culinary world. How can anyone put those slimy, degusting things in their mouth? 
'Ere, you - that's comfort food you're dissing! Anyway, they're baked, not fried!
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« Reply #412 on: April 08, 2021, 05:49:26 am »


We tend to think of the cuisine from one country or another as having been made to a particular recipe using particular foods for centuries, when in fact all countries have an evolving cuisine which will continue to evolve right up to the moment we find some "superfood" on some distant planet which will be all the craze until the next discovery. I would just like to see baked beans vanish from the culinary world. How can anyone put those slimy, degusting things in their mouth?  

It's true. I've made the case that Tex Mex and American Southwest food are basically two different genres. The former being a very bastardized 20th version of Southwest food long forgotten due to the displacement of Mexicans after the United States took over the territory of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California plus other states. Whereas America Southwest food is a revival or reconstruction of regional food in the 1990s til present day, heavily based on Mexican cuisine and New World cuisine as applied by professional chefs, which looks nothing like the Atomic age Tex Mex.


I'm very sad to hear you say don't like beans. I couldn't resist after all this talk about Tolucan street food and went ahead today at my local supermarket and bought the ingredients to make the meatball dish above.. Make sure you don't tune into the Food Food Food thread because I'll be posting there shortly!

It's near midnight and the dish is still cooking. It'll be done shortly.
Wish you could smell the smokey aroma of peppers, garlic, bacon and maple (the latter from the beans I buy)
« Last Edit: April 08, 2021, 05:55:58 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #413 on: April 08, 2021, 06:37:15 am »

I would just like to see baked beans vanish from the culinary world. How can anyone put those slimy, degusting things in their mouth? 
'Ere, you - that's comfort food you're dissing! Anyway, they're baked, not fried!

That's why I'm posting on the food thread!

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« Reply #414 on: April 08, 2021, 06:43:57 am »


SNIP

The recipes you mention and their other local alternatives with their use of meat balls and sausages, are likely to be relatively modern and have a post Columbian
Spanish colonial influence.    

Though as Wikipedia university will tell you, neither meat balls and  sausages [nor pizza] are a Spanish or Italian invention. They all have their origin in the Middle East and  came  to the Mediterranean with the conquering Arabs. Which could be why they are so moreish ha ha ha

 

I know, as with Pasta originating in the Far East most likely. These foods just became very convenient forms by the middle ages. When people ask me about the food influence from Spain in Mexico I like to append the term "Medieval European" to the foods brought into the Americas, because it was (for them) the 700 year old meshing of Middle Eastern (rice, chickpeas, spices) influence on post Roman and Germanic food (pork, citrus fruits, grapes and wheat wine) in Spain. The path from Rome to the Americas is a 2000 year old food saga.

Quote
They are thoughisding a key ingredient

Not exactly. Tomato is one of the ingredients in the meatball dish. I use a whole can of crushed tomatoes with garlic and olive oil to dilute one 4 Oz can of Chipotle peppers in Adobo barbecue sauce for two pounds of meatballs (and the dish is still hot after that!). The tomatoes came from the land of the Aztec. They're specifically Mesoamerican in origin. No tomatoes in the Old World before Hernan Cortez.

Also the green sauce has Tomatillos as a main ingredient. The Tomatillo is Tomato's little brother, looks like a small green tomato with a paper-like cover like an onion would have.

 Just as what we now consider traditional cuisine of the Asian, Indian, British, European or Antipodean cultures etc  rely heavily on  foods from the Americas. Including the ubiquitous NZ / Kiwi  staple ingredient splashed in everything,  tomato sauce.

 Capsicum varieties, tomato, potato, corn, pumpkin and other  squash cultivars [cucumber, courgette and melons]),  pineapple, peanuts, passion fruit,  chocolate , cashews, beans , avacado , vanilla, common berries

 Generally a long list of what the world eats today on a regular basis  and other various spices, herbs, luxury foods that we take forgranted  and associate with fancy foreign  foods. It's a whole new world of cooking .

We tend to think of the cuisine from one country or another as having been made to a particular recipe using particular foods for centuries, when in fact all countries have an evolving cuisine which will continue to evolve right up to the moment we find some "superfood" on some distant planet which will be all the craze until the next discovery. I would just like to see baked beans vanish from the culinary world. How can anyone put those slimy, degusting things in their mouth? 

  Peasant women and shepards on the hillsides would have thrown anything in the pot that was seasonal, hand or still edible.  Or as they are called today "store cupboard meals".   A shepards pie may have on desperate  occasion contained real shepard.

  Baked beans in a tin  are not  appetizing in themselves. They are OK on a pizza  or in a chili. Family meals are in constant evolution
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« Reply #415 on: April 08, 2021, 06:58:39 am »

Sorry folks, it's past my bedtime and I have to work later in 8 hours or so, so I'll post later in the food thread. It looks like j may have to revise the age of the dishes. While I still think they're modern, I found out that the region was a consession granted to Hernán Cortés (correct spelling) for him to develop a pork and beef industry, since he had previously done so in Cuba. That means that the meat tradition including the making of sausage may date back to the 16th century! No word on how old this street food is, but since the ingredients are fairly old (can easily date back to the 16th century - chorizo is made from sweet pepper after all), you may be looking at legitimate colonial dishes.

But I have cooked and sampled said dish, and all I can say is that it's really good! I'll come back tomorrow!

https://tolucalabellacd.com/2020/09/08/donde-ir/historia-famoso-chorizo-toluca-130292/?amp=1

Quote
Cortés in particular, from 1525, installed his pig, sheep and cow farms in the Toluca Valley.  Later, in 1529, he was granted, by Royal Decree of Carlos V, the Marquisade of the Valley. Apparently, Cortés chose the Matlatzinco Valley, as the Toluca Valley was previously called, because he had the intention of consolidating cattle ranching in the area.Cortés had been a prosperous pig farmer in Cuba, so it is said that his expedition to the mainland brought bacon, salted pork, most likely hams.


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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #416 on: April 08, 2021, 05:37:21 pm »

I would just like to see baked beans vanish from the culinary world. How can anyone put those slimy, degusting things in their mouth? 
'Ere, you - that's comfort food you're dissing! Anyway, they're baked, not fried!
Very true but are often and most likely included in an English Fry Up, oh we Brits know how to harden the arteries and live unhealthy, starting with breakfast.  Grin
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« Reply #417 on: April 09, 2021, 03:14:02 am »

Oh, I love beans - we eat a lot of beans, just not the ones from a can with the added sugar, tomato flavoured and flour thickened sauce. Mexican style beans are great. Beans in minestrone soup, white bean salad - white bean dip etc etc - all really great food.
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« Reply #418 on: April 09, 2021, 11:18:06 pm »

Oh, I love beans - we eat a lot of beans, just not the ones from a can with the added sugar, tomato flavoured and flour thickened sauce. Mexican style beans are great. Beans in minestrone soup, white bean salad - white bean dip etc etc - all really great food.

Sorry for the delay in posting! I had to do my taxes today (thankfully online it's very easy), plus I got caught up in the (bad) news today. I'll be posting momentarily in the Food thread.
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« Reply #419 on: April 10, 2021, 01:59:06 am »

Oh, I love beans - we eat a lot of beans, just not the ones from a can with the added sugar, tomato flavoured and flour thickened sauce. Mexican style beans are great. Beans in minestrone soup, white bean salad - white bean dip etc etc - all really great food.

Sorry for the delay in posting! I had to do my taxes today (thankfully online it's very easy), plus I got caught up in the (bad) news today. I'll be posting momentarily in the Food thread.

Hopefully the "bad" news doesn't involve family or job.  Sad
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« Reply #420 on: April 10, 2021, 02:48:23 am »

Oh, I love beans - we eat a lot of beans, just not the ones from a can with the added sugar, tomato flavoured and flour thickened sauce. Mexican style beans are great. Beans in minestrone soup, white bean salad - white bean dip etc etc - all really great food.

Sorry for the delay in posting! I had to do my taxes today (thankfully online it's very easy), plus I got caught up in the (bad) news today. I'll be posting momentarily in the Food thread.

Hopefully the "bad" news doesn't involve family or job.  Sad

Thankfully not personal news. I meant global news, but in the end they're bad news...
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« Reply #421 on: April 15, 2021, 02:24:26 am »

Gulab jamun

Jalebi

Okra



(BTB, this list maybe added to)
« Last Edit: April 15, 2021, 03:12:46 am by Mercury Wells » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #422 on: April 15, 2021, 07:40:09 am »

Gulab jamun

Jalebi

Okra



(BTB, this list maybe added to)

Gulab jamun  looks very exotic. More so because milk is reduced to a "dough" and then fried in butter. Looks fairly involved to make. One of the most creative uses of milk, other than the Dulce de Leche and Cajeta in Latin America.

Fried Okra is very common in the United State's South. It's linked to African foods brought in during colonial times and was widespread due to slavery. It is similar to cacti in that the leaves are fleshy pods and they have a similar bland flavor with a type of slime of goo. The way to get rid of the goo is to cook it with tomato. The other is to batter and fry.

Southern Living: Fried Okra

« Last Edit: April 15, 2021, 07:46:20 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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