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Author Topic: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~  (Read 33729 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #250 on: April 24, 2018, 08:07:24 pm »

Even more dangerous, this menu of pork leads to the perennial Australian cross-ditch query:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)


So, hastily back to the Chiko.

  NZ where men are brave... And sheep are worried

But it's a vicious little circle. If you knew what the farmer did to the sheep would you eat the meat? No! Of course not! The solution is of course, government mandated chastity belts (for the sheep), and a compulsory Christian lecturing to the farmers...  Grin

You could create a grade schedule for the quality of the meat. Similar to the  "USDA Prime,"  "USDA Choice" and "USDA Prime" qualifiers for beef in the United States... Something like this:

"100% Prime New Zealand Virgin Lamb"   Cheesy Grin


« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 08:19:20 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #251 on: April 25, 2018, 11:20:39 am »

Even more dangerous, this menu of pork leads to the perennial Australian cross-ditch query:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)


So, hastily back to the Chiko.

  NZ where men are brave... And sheep are worried

But it's a vicious little circle. If you knew what the farmer did to the sheep would you eat the meat? No! Of course not! The solution is of course, government mandated chastity belts (for the sheep), and a compulsory Christian lecturing to the farmers...  Grin

You could create a grade schedule for the quality of the meat. Similar to the  "USDA Prime,"  "USDA Choice" and "USDA Prime" qualifiers for beef in the United States... Something like this:

"100% Prime New Zealand Virgin Lamb"   Cheesy Grin




 That would only work  if they could find any wise men
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #252 on: October 01, 2018, 05:24:47 am »

Rostis
&
Hash Browns

[EDIT]Middlesbrough parmo recipe[EDIT]

« Last Edit: October 01, 2018, 05:35:00 am by Mercury Wells » Logged

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« Reply #253 on: October 01, 2018, 08:56:09 am »


 Mmm that is worth a try
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #254 on: October 02, 2018, 09:34:48 am »

I think potato pancakes are somewhat universal. The potato started life in South America, and then spread to Europe and elsewhere, so it's really everywhere.

Speaking of which, there is this street plate called "Salchipapas" in Peru (salchicha=sausage, papas= potatoes), also known as "Salchipulpos" (pulpo=octopus not because of the ingredients but how the sausage is sliced in the shape of a tiny octopus) elsewhere in Latin America.

I don't think this is "traditional food," but rather contemporary. I don't even know if it could be called "Peruvian." Certainly in Mexico I never heard of it in the 1970/80s. South America can have a more European menu, but I expect that more around Argentina, Uruguay and Chile where there is a greater German influence from immigrants - so I'm not sure why Lime Peru is considered the epicentre for this food of sausage potatoes and coleslaw.

Anyhow, as the name implies this is a plate of fried sausage and potatoes. The sausage is typically an American style Wiener/Frank/Hot Dog which in turn is a derivative of Mortadella and Frankfurter Würstel in Europe. The potatoes may be British style chips (wedges) or French Fries or otherwise. Coleslaw, mustard and olive sauce is more typical in South America and chili peppers or hot sauce in Mexico. Ketchup is also used.

The one in Mexico is rather odd, because the sausage links are cut in the shape of a tiny octopus. I've also seen it in that form coming from Spain.


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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #255 on: October 02, 2018, 11:07:58 am »


   That is a tasty combo. I cook some thing similar  with cubed potatoes, sausage [ or ham / bacon], onion, silver beet  what have you.  The sausages would not be traditional  Peruvian  offerings.  The idea of octapus or Kraken   is an interesting turn.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #256 on: October 20, 2018, 01:25:23 am »

my favourite fried foods are Japanese (sometimes I hate how obvious I am. This is not one of those times). Strangely enough, for a country known for its healthy cuisine, the Japanese are really actually overly fond of frying food. They fry almost everything. (The best part is where I ate fried foods almost daily in Japan, and I still lost weight)

There`s korokke, a fried..potato...thing....that`s really good. It often comes with a sauce, but you can get it as it is too. They sold them at my uni in Kyoto for 36 yen each (which was, well, a couple of cents in euro), so I ate them everyday in the short break.



Then there`s of course tempura, which I think everyone knows. Especially ebi tempura (shrimp) and pumpkin tempura are personal favourites.


Other fried foods include but are not limited to karaage (fried chicken), tonkatsu (pork), inarizushi (fried tofu poach filled with rice), and tofu.

Aaaand now I`m really hungry. Again. Thanks. Wink


I don't know if I've mentioned this in this thread. Apologies if I repeated something, but Tempura was actually brought to Japan by the Portuguese in the 17th. C

Quote
toward the end of the 16th century, a fritter-cooking technique using flour and eggs as a batter was acquired from Portuguese missionaries and merchants from the region of Alentejo, who resided in Nagasaki. It came about as a way to fulfill the fasting and abstinence rules for Catholics surrounding the quarterly ember days (Latin: Quatuor Tempora). Hence, the etymology of the word, tempura. In those days, tempura in Nagasaki was deep-fried in lard with a batter consisting of flour, water, eggs, and salt, and unlike the modern version, was eaten without a dipping sauce


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempura

In the beginning of the 17th century around the Tokyo Bay area, the raw materials of tempura and its method underwent a remarkable change as the Yatai (food cart) culture gained more popularity. Making the best use of fresh seafood while preserving its delicate taste, tempura used only flour, eggs and water as ingredients and the batter was not flavored. As the batter was mixed minimally in cold water, it avoided the dough-like stickiness caused by the activation of wheat gluten, resulting in the crispy texture which is now characteristic of tempura. It became customary to eat tempura by dipping quickly in a sauce mixed with grated daikon just before it was eaten. Today in Japan the mainstream of tempura recipes basically originate from "Tokyo style (Edo style)" tempura, which was invented at the food stalls along the riverside fish market in the Edo period.

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« Reply #257 on: October 20, 2018, 08:03:26 pm »

Tempura.  Reminds me...

Circa 1990, a little lunch counter in Ypsilanti, Michigan, called "College Dog", was owned by a Chinese immigrant family. They had what you would expect at a hot dog/burger counter, but they also offered a few stir fry dishes.

They had a dish called, simply, "Spicy Chicken with Vegetables". It was chicken fried in tempura batter, with stir-fried vegetables, in spicy brown sauce. It was a bit like General Tso's chicken, except without the sugar or tomato paste. Not exceptionally exotic, but I haven't seen this exact dish on any menu anywhere else before or since.

They would prepare it right there, behind the counter; dried chillies were fried in the oil before the other vegetables, and they would put a generous squirt of sriracha sauce into the walk before adding the fried chicken to the final mixture. That was the first time I ever saw sriracha sauce, and shortly thereafter I bought a bottle at the first Chinese grocery store I ever saw.

College Dog closed when the family decided to relocate to Florida; it couldn't have been for lack of business. I've never had that precise dish ever since, and now I think that I need to formulate a recipe for it from my memories.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #258 on: October 22, 2018, 10:10:59 pm »

And how about this? The so-British Fish and Chips, is actually Portuguese and more specifically Jewish. It came after the routing of Jews in the Iberian Peninsula when 8th-12th C  Sephardic Jews lived in relative safety within Portugal which was al-Andalus at the time. Later when Portugal began to persecute Jews, some fled to England. The fried fish was made on Fridays, as religious law forbade them to cook anything on Sabbath. The batter was believed to preserve the fish so it oculd be made on Fraday and eaten on Saturday.

In Britain, the dish known in Andalusian dialect as pescaíto frito (fried fish)  became known as "Fish prepared in the Jewish Manner" in the streets of London. The chips, however, were not added until late in the 19th. C.

Quote
But the Friday-night tradition was likely chipless until the late-19th century. The general popularity of the potato bloomed late in Europe, and it wasn’t until the late 1800s that the tuber was accepted, due especially to the promotional efforts of a French scientist. Though there are several theories of how the potato came to England—and how it became the “chip” we know and love today—one historical account credits a tripe vendor by the name of Mrs. “Granny” Duce with selling the first fried cut potatoes to the public.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/who-invented-fish-and-chips

How Fish and Chips Migrated to Great Britain

« Last Edit: October 22, 2018, 10:12:52 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #259 on: October 23, 2018, 09:23:49 pm »

This cannot possibly be authentic fish and chips because although it is displayed on a beach there is not one seagull trying to steal it!!!

By the way, it depends which area of England you come from whether it is 'fish and chips' or 'chips and fish' (and whether, traditionally, you put gravy on the chips …)
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« Reply #260 on: October 24, 2018, 07:32:39 am »

By the way, it depends which area of England you come from whether it is 'fish and chips' or 'chips and fish' (and whether, traditionally, you put gravy on the chips …)
And once you head into Scotland it becomes a 'fish supper'.  Smiley
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #261 on: December 06, 2018, 01:15:43 am »

(Deep) Fried Grits.

« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 02:19:58 am by Mercury Wells » Logged
Mercury Wells
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« Reply #262 on: December 06, 2018, 03:54:58 am »

By the way, it depends which area of England you come from whether it is 'fish and chips' or 'chips and fish' (and whether, traditionally, you put gravy on the chips …)
And once you head into Scotland it becomes a 'fish supper'.  Smiley

Or even "a bag of (fish &) chips" in some parts of S. Wales.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #263 on: December 06, 2018, 11:45:26 pm »

(Deep) Fried Grits.



This truly sounds disgusting. For anyone who has eaten grits you will know that frying them would do nothing for the taste. Like frying baby food.
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #264 on: December 27, 2018, 01:26:05 am »

Fried Chicken or Duck gizzards.
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #265 on: March 28, 2019, 10:09:22 pm »

Panella Sicilian Fritters.
Arancini Sicilian Stuffed Rice Balls.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #266 on: April 01, 2019, 11:24:04 pm »

Panella Sicilian Fritters.
*snip*
And that opens to a number of chickpea fried foods all over, I believe....
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #267 on: April 23, 2019, 03:37:46 pm »

Pantua (Indian type of sweet)

Scotch Eggs

Tokneneng Made with chicken eggs.

Kwek Kwek. Made with Quail eggs.

« Last Edit: April 23, 2019, 05:50:59 pm by Mercury Wells » Logged
Banfili
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« Reply #268 on: April 24, 2019, 02:09:18 am »

When I was a kid, the leftover lamb from the weekend roast was sliced up and made into lamb fritters - just a normal batter, or occasionally a beer batter, and fried. Also subject to a battering was the humble potato, sliced, and fried to become the (in NSW) the potato scallop, aka potato cake. The bananas were crumbed, and the pineapple slices were also be crumbed. My dad used to make fried scones, too.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #269 on: April 25, 2019, 06:13:27 am »

When I was a kid, the leftover lamb from the weekend roast was sliced up and made into lamb fritters - just a normal batter, or occasionally a beer batter, and fried. Also subject to a battering was the humble potato, sliced, and fried to become the (in NSW) the potato scallop, aka potato cake. The bananas were crumbed, and the pineapple slices were also be crumbed. My dad used to make fried scones, too.

  That's all got the taste buds tickled.  The lamb fritters  sound delicious. I'm familiar with home made banana fritters made with mashed banana and sliced apple fritters. Along with  Shell fish fritters. Sliced Potato fritters and pineapple slice fritters  are usually a treat from the take aways.
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Banfili
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« Reply #270 on: April 25, 2019, 01:30:06 pm »

When I was a kid, the leftover lamb from the weekend roast was sliced up and made into lamb fritters - just a normal batter, or occasionally a beer batter, and fried. Also subject to a battering was the humble potato, sliced, and fried to become the (in NSW) the potato scallop, aka potato cake. The bananas were crumbed, and the pineapple slices were also be crumbed. My dad used to make fried scones, too.

  That's all got the taste buds tickled.  The lamb fritters  sound delicious. I'm familiar with home made banana fritters made with mashed banana and sliced apple fritters. Along with  Shell fish fritters. Sliced Potato fritters and pineapple slice fritters  are usually a treat from the take aways.

Lamb fritters were Monday night - Tuesday was what remained of the lamb minced, with mashed potatoes, peas & gravy!
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #271 on: April 25, 2019, 05:58:31 pm »

When I was a kid, the leftover lamb from the weekend roast was sliced up and made into lamb fritters - just a normal batter, or occasionally a beer batter, and fried. Also subject to a battering was the humble potato, sliced, and fried to become the (in NSW) the potato scallop, aka potato cake. The bananas were crumbed, and the pineapple slices were also be crumbed. My dad used to make fried scones, too.

  That's all got the taste buds tickled.  The lamb fritters  sound delicious. I'm familiar with home made banana fritters made with mashed banana and sliced apple fritters. Along with  Shell fish fritters. Sliced Potato fritters and pineapple slice fritters  are usually a treat from the take aways.

Lamb fritters were Monday night - Tuesday was what remained of the lamb minced, with mashed potatoes, peas & gravy!

  Now your talking. Sunday roast made to stretch a few days. Roast meat sandwiches
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #272 on: April 25, 2019, 09:07:04 pm »

The word "fritters" reminded me of something. Have we mentioned Fried Plantain Bananas? Much starchier than it's sweet sibling, the Cavendish Banana (which we all know), and more like a potato in consistency and flavour,  the Plantain banana is so hard it needs to be sliced in roundels, cooked once, squashed flat like a pancake and then fried for a second time before seasoning.

In it's native Africa, as well as the Caribbean and South America, fried Plantains (also known in Latin America as Platano Macho ("Male Banana")  Roll Eyes or "Platano Maduro ("Ripe Banana") are eaten much the same as potato "chips" in the UK and Fries in the US:

Fried Plantains
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #273 on: April 27, 2019, 11:06:34 am »


 Here in the Antipodes we have  "green bananas",  used by our Pasifika brethren from the Islands, for cooking. They are bigger firmer greener banana  used much like potato or yam.  Baked, toasted, boiled.  I was never brave enough to try, when I lived in an area where shops  sold them as staple.

 As an aside; while studying Ghana at primary school [age around 9yr], our teacher  cooked us up a batch  of chopped bananas [in place of plantain] and paprika. I  have experimented at home since, but it has never tasted the same as on the old electric fry pan  in the classroom
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #274 on: April 27, 2019, 06:34:50 pm »


 Here in the Antipodes we have  "green bananas",  used by our Pasifika brethren from the Islands, for cooking. They are bigger firmer greener banana  used much like potato or yam.  Baked, toasted, boiled.  I was never brave enough to try, when I lived in an area where shops  sold them as staple.

 As an aside; while studying Ghana at primary school [age around 9yr], our teacher  cooked us up a batch  of chopped bananas [in place of plantain] and paprika. I  have experimented at home since, but it has never tasted the same as on the old electric fry pan  in the classroom

Seems to me that "Green Bananas" would be a better match for the Ghanian dish w/ hot red pepper powder instead of paprika (sweets pepper). Ripe Cavendish bananas are too sweet and soft. You want something starchy. Also in the West we need to move away from Cavendish Bananas. They're one breath away from falling vulnerable to one particular disease, because they're all clones from each other.

The irony is there are over 4000 (?) species of bananas of all colours and sizes. We should not be in this position. The global production of bananas is dominated by just a handful (less than 5) companies in the world, all of them using the same Cavendish banana clone. People in the 1st World need to learn to eat "different foods."
« Last Edit: April 27, 2019, 06:43:58 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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