Author Topic: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~  (Read 64953 times)

J. Wilhelm

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #175 on: June 20, 2015, 05:43:57 am »
Acarajé is a dish made from peeled black-eyed peas formed into a ball and then deep-fried in dendê (palm oil). It is found in West African and Brazilian cuisines. The dish is traditionally encountered in Brazil's northeastern state of Bahia, especially in the city of Salvador, often as street food, and is also found in many countries in West Africa, including Nigeria, Ghana, Togo, Benin, Mali, Gambia.

It is served split in half and stuffed with vatapá and caruru – spicy pastes made from shrimp, ground cashews, palm oil and other ingredients.[1] The most common way of eating acarajé is splitting it in half, pouring vatapá and/or caruru, a salad made out of green and red tomatoes, fried shrimps and homemade hot pepper sauce. A vegetarian version is typically served with hot peppers and green tomatoes.

Akara (as it is known in southwest and southeast Nigeria) a recipe taken to Brazil by the slaves from the West African coast. It is called "akara" by the Igbo people of south-eastern Nigeria and the Yoruba people of south-western Nigeria, "kosai" by the Hausa people of Nigeria or "koose" in Ghana and is a popular breakfast dish, eaten with millet or corn pudding. In Nigeria, Akara is commonly eaten with bread, "Ogi" (or "Eko"), a type of Cornmeal made with fine corn flour.

"'Akara'" is originally a recipe by the Yoruba people of South western Nigeria which has overtime being adopted by the rest of the country. Akara used to play a significant role in the Yoruba culture, as it was only prepared when a person who has come of Age (70 and Above) dies. It was usually fried in large quantity and distributed across every household close to the deceased. "Akara" also used to be prepared in large as a sign of victory, when warriors came back victorious from war.The women, especially the wives of the Warriors were to fry "Akara" and distribute it to the whole village.

Today in Bahia, Brazil, most street vendors who serve acarajé are women, easily recognizable by their all-white cotton dresses and headscarves and caps. The image of these women, often simply called baianas, frequently appears in artwork from the region of Bahia. Acarajé, however, is available outside of the state of Bahia as well, including the streets of its neighbor state Sergipe, and the markets of Rio de Janeiro.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acaraj%C3%A9

That last one is a rather interesting addition!  Thank you Mr. Gil

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Quin

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #176 on: June 21, 2015, 01:32:38 am »
Although poutine was mentioned way back in the thread, it was only in a quoted section from Wikipedia and easy to miss, therefore I cast the official vote for this uniquely Canadian dish.  

Wikipedia: Poutine Classique at La Banquise in Montreal.


French fries covered in cheese curds and slathered in gravy (to melt the cheese).  Also known as "heart attack on a plate", it's popular enough (in eastern Canada at least) that local Wendy's and Burger Kings serve a fast-food version of it.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2015, 01:34:55 am by Quin »

Mercury Wells

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #177 on: October 06, 2015, 12:48:03 am »
Fish Fingers (possibly one to add to the Victorian list as well?)
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Sir Henry

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #178 on: October 11, 2015, 12:12:13 pm »
Have we had Ice Cream Tod yet? A Thai dessert which consists of a ball of ice cream surrounded in a coconut-based batter coating. This, as far as I can work out, kept in the freezer for at least a day (for the batter to freeze) before being taken out and deep fried. The batter insulates the ice cream so that it's still frozen inside a ball that's crispy on the outside. Dangerously delicious.

That's chocolate sauce, not soy.

This video shows how to make a slightly different version from the ones I've had:
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J. Wilhelm

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #179 on: October 12, 2015, 08:25:26 am »
My heart stopped just looking at that.  ;D 

On the other hand I think I may have a solution for the allegations of cruelty to death row inmates in America.  Instead of executing them by lethal injection or electrocution, we could simply feed them any of the foods we have in this thread, preferably a few of the tods above, or possibly in conjunction with the deep fried bacon on the first page of the thread. There are many advantages to this:

1. It saves one step in the punishment process by folding the execution with the inmate's last wish
2. No special equipment is needed, A kitchen equipped with  deep frier a table an a chair is all the equipment required.  A chef and a pastry chef are the only execution staff required.
3. The cost of food is much lower than the cost of lethal drugs.
4. All execution materials are perfectly legal and are easily obtainable from food providers
5. No one can claim that the inmate is suffering or treated inhumanely.
6. It minimizes psychiatric scarring for the executioner, since he/she doesn't witness any suffering.
7. Its a delicious way to die.

 ;D


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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #180 on: October 12, 2015, 06:09:36 pm »


Dongfeng vermicelli, AKA cellophane noodles, AKA bean string. If you boil them you get rather insubstantial transparent noodles that absorb flavors readily. If you fry them in oil, they puff up and become crisp; a great topping for a stir-fry dish.

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #181 on: October 12, 2015, 07:07:44 pm »
Dongfeng vermicelli, AKA cellophane noodles, AKA bean string. If you boil them you get rather insubstantial transparent noodles that absorb flavors readily. If you fry them in oil, they puff up and become crisp; a great topping for a stir-fry dish.
Thanks for that. Being a frequent (stir-)frier, I'll have to try that, they sound like a wonderful crispy addition.

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #182 on: October 12, 2015, 09:44:09 pm »
Don't know if anyone has mentioned this previously but my mother used to make deep-fried battered jam sandwiches, sprinkled with icing sugar. I'm not sure where she got the idea from.
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J. Wilhelm

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #183 on: October 13, 2015, 09:45:53 am »
Don't know if anyone has mentioned this previously but my mother used to make deep-fried battered jam sandwiches, sprinkled with icing sugar. I'm not sure where she got the idea from.

Perhaps a variation on the savoury Monte Cristo sandwich?

Basically, you take a French Croque-monsieur. made with Emmental or Gruyère cheese and then dip it in egg batter and deep fry.  The finished product is sprinkled with powdered sugar or even maple syrup and treated like French Toast or served with fruit preserves.


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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #184 on: October 13, 2015, 02:19:40 pm »
Have we had Ice Cream Tod yet? A Thai dessert which consists of a ball of ice cream surrounded in a coconut-based batter coating. This, as far as I can work out, kept in the freezer for at least a day (for the batter to freeze) before being taken out and deep fried. The batter insulates the ice cream so that it's still frozen inside a ball that's crispy on the outside. Dangerously delicious.


In the Antipodes AKA Deep-Fried IceCream. The dessert staple of every Chinese Restaurant or Take-away Shop.
Layers of batter/breadcrumbs, refreeze until very hard, then into the oil...

Here's a homemade version: 
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DsLVsoJhOjA
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J. Wilhelm

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #185 on: October 14, 2015, 01:58:47 am »
Have we had Ice Cream Tod yet? A Thai dessert which consists of a ball of ice cream surrounded in a coconut-based batter coating. This, as far as I can work out, kept in the freezer for at least a day (for the batter to freeze) before being taken out and deep fried. The batter insulates the ice cream so that it's still frozen inside a ball that's crispy on the outside. Dangerously delicious.


In the Antipodes AKA Deep-Fried IceCream. The dessert staple of every Chinese Restaurant or Take-away Shop.
Layers of batter/breadcrumbs, refreeze until very hard, then into the oil...

Here's a homemade version: 
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DsLVsoJhOjA

Chinese restaurant?  ???  Oh well... I do  know the Chinese penchant for fried foods,  but I never saw this contemporary "pop culture" concoction often in Asian restaurants, and the closest I can think of is a dessert in the form of fried egg rolls with vanilla ice cream and a syrup sauce at a Chinese-American restaurant chain called PF Chang's.  Back when I had money to go to hipster restaurants like that.

Other "pop" desserts I've seen were sweet bean deserts (some with Gummy Bears and ice  :P ) in Vietnamese restaurants,  or some of the Japanese Bubble Tea joints outside the college campus.

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #186 on: October 14, 2015, 04:16:58 am »
I suspect it's more a modern Australo-Chinese thing than actual authentic Han Cuisine.

That and fried battered pineapple rings or bananas - they're probably the easiest desserts to make when all you have in the kitchen are woks and a deep-fryer.

J. Wilhelm

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #187 on: October 14, 2015, 05:32:42 am »
I suspect it's more a modern Australo-Chinese thing than actual authentic Han Cuisine.

That and fried battered pineapple rings or bananas - they're probably the easiest desserts to make when all you have in the kitchen are woks and a deep-fryer.
Actually, I think I made a mistake.  I got the recipe online for banana egg rolls,  on a website that  promotes "copycat recipes" from PF Chang's.   I think at the instigation of my grandfather we ordered it "a la mode"  with vanilla ice cream.

http://pfchangsathome.blogspot.com/2013/01/banana-spring-rolls.html?m=1


Quote
BANANA SPRING ROLLS
P.F. Chang's China Bistro Copycat Recipe

Rolls:
ripe bananas
wonton wrappers
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/8 teaspoon Chinese five spice mix
oil for frying

Garnishes:
caramel sauce
strawberries
ice cream (pineapple coconut, vanilla, etc)

Preheat two inches of oil to 350 degrees in a saucepan. Set two small bowls side by side, one with a scoop of brown or white sugar mixed with the five spice, one with water. Separate the egg roll wrappers you are going to use, one per half banana.

Cut banana in half crosswise, then coat banana in sugar and place in the wrapper. Spread water all over the edges of the dough and roll it up like a burrito, sealing the ends by folding and pushing the dough together with your fingers. If a halved banana is too long, trim the edges to fit the dough. Prepare all the banana pieces before frying.

Fry one or two at a time, carefully turning to brown evenly on all sides. Remove from oil and slice rolls in half. Serve warm over pineapple-coconut ice cream, with berries and a drizzle of caramel.

Notes: Chinese five spice is made of: cinnamon, anise, ginger and cloves. if you don't have it, shake into the sugar a tiny amount of those spices instead. a. tiny. amount.
Variation: layer chocolate chips or shredded coconut underneath banana before rolling.



« Last Edit: October 14, 2015, 05:40:36 am by J. Wilhelm »

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #188 on: October 14, 2015, 11:24:35 am »
had deep fried haggis in scotland last summer.
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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #189 on: October 14, 2015, 12:43:06 pm »
I think the Scots are world class when it comes to fried food - and I think the Heart disease rate is a good measure of that!

In Scotland you can get just about anything deep fried at a local take away - coupled with the fact that most Scots will eat anything in a buttered bread roll ( then called "A roll and ***" ie a roll and sausage, a roll and chips or even a roll and scotch pie)  you are quids in for a right and proper carb load.

Deep fried Mars Bar:


Deep fried Pizza:

Deep fried Haggis:


And for that special time of year Deep Fried Christmas Pudding:
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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #190 on: October 14, 2015, 01:58:48 pm »
True. Though we tried getting the marsbars but they're not commonly sold anymore. Seemingly only tourists actually  eat those things.
Fried haggis was nice though.

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #191 on: October 14, 2015, 04:53:23 pm »
Yes you are correct the deep fried Mars bar are now only consumed by tourists  - but the haggis and  deep fried pizzas can regularly be seen eaten by Glasgows finest shortly after the pubs close :-)

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #192 on: May 28, 2016, 01:38:11 am »
Threadomancy work at its best.....BWHAHA*cough, cough, wheeze*HAHA

Prawn Balls et al.

J. Wilhelm

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #193 on: May 28, 2016, 06:57:08 am »
Threadomancy work at its best.....BWHAHA*cough, cough, wheeze*HAHA

Prawn Balls et al.

Well yeah, Dim Sum has a variety of fried dishes...

"Shrimp Toast" looks interesting. And I can honestly say that I've never had it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrimp_toast


Shrimp toast or prawn toast is a Chinese dim sum dish. It is made from small triangles of bread, brushed with egg and coated with minced shrimp and water chestnuts, then cooked by baking or deep frying. It is a common appetizer in Australian and American Chinese cuisine. A common variant in the United Kingdom, Australia and Ireland is sesame prawn toast. This involves sprinkling sesame seeds before the baking or deep frying process.



J. Wilhelm

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #194 on: May 28, 2016, 07:03:06 am »
Yes you are correct the deep fried Mars bar are now only consumed by tourists  - but the haggis and  deep fried pizzas can regularly be seen eaten by Glasgows finest shortly after the pubs close :-)

Yeah, we have deep fried Mars bars too, but I'd say fried Mars bars and fried Pizza are definitely a 20th/21st C. novelty (similar to deep fried bacon), and neither is a traditional Scott dish.... Deep fried Haggis, at least had the saving grace of being the 21st. C. deep fried version of a traditional dish...  ::)

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #195 on: May 28, 2016, 12:34:42 pm »
Threadomancy work at its best.....BWHAHA*cough, cough, wheeze*HAHA

Prawn Balls et al.

Well yeah, Dim Sum has a variety of fried dishes...

"Shrimp Toast" looks interesting. And I can honestly say that I've never had it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrimp_toast


Shrimp toast or prawn toast is a Chinese dim sum dish. It is made from small triangles of bread, brushed with egg and coated with minced shrimp and water chestnuts, then cooked by baking or deep frying. It is a common appetizer in Australian and American Chinese cuisine. A common variant in the United Kingdom, Australia and Ireland is sesame prawn toast. This involves sprinkling sesame seeds before the baking or deep frying process.



The last time I was in Toronto, Chinatown venders were selling this on the street.

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #196 on: May 29, 2016, 01:30:24 am »
Flute Fries...
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J. Wilhelm

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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #197 on: May 29, 2016, 02:13:58 am »
Flute Fries...

 ???

Perhaps this? https://serenadraws.wordpress.com/tag/french-fries/

Now there another type of fried flute out there.  Flautas are just thin-rolled and deep fried tacos. In the United States they're called "Taquitos" (little tacos) and in Mexico they're called "Flautas" (flutes).  It seems no one can agree on whether Flautas are Mexican or American. Some say they're Art Deco Era American. But they're so generic, being just a deep fried taco, that it seems highly unlikely that Mexicans would not have developed Flautas prior to the 1930's in California and New Mexico.





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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #198 on: June 09, 2016, 07:41:27 pm »
Threadomancy work at its best.....BWHAHA*cough, cough, wheeze*HAHA

Prawn Balls et al.

Well yeah, Dim Sum has a variety of fried dishes...

"Shrimp Toast" looks interesting. And I can honestly say that I've never had it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrimp_toast


Shrimp toast or prawn toast is a Chinese dim sum dish. It is made from small triangles of bread, brushed with egg and coated with minced shrimp and water chestnuts, then cooked by baking or deep frying. It is a common appetizer in Australian and American Chinese cuisine. A common variant in the United Kingdom, Australia and Ireland is sesame prawn toast. This involves sprinkling sesame seeds before the baking or deep frying process.



I love sesame prawn toast. It's more delicious than anything has a right to be. I try to resist because I'm normally a vegetarian though. Especially since the fateful day I discovered that when they send you it's bag of crispy sesame counted bread as a free gift our local Chinese takeaway actually sends you a variation on the theme - sesame chicken toast. I've never eaten chicken, or any other meat besides fish/sea food before and it made me quite ill. Also I had been looking after pet chickens that week...

I'd still recommend prawn toast though, really yummy!
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Re: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~
« Reply #199 on: June 09, 2016, 09:30:55 pm »
I'm surprised. Why can't I see the шашлык and its analogues? Simple meat roasted over the heat?

Take small pieces of meat, marinated and roasted on skewers over wood coals. Yes, in principle it may be not meat but vegetables or fish.

Select the basis and the marinade creates a lot of recipes and debate what is right.

I for example, in season, marinated in red currant. :)

Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?