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Author Topic: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~  (Read 34786 times)
delCano
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« Reply #150 on: February 15, 2014, 09:19:26 pm »

Had porros the other day but they weren't served with chocolate
Sorry, after I stopped laughing I had to correct you. "Porros" are joints, and since chocolate is a common slang for hashish, your sentence means something different that you intended...
"Porras", besides the sticks police carry around, are the kind of thicker, shorter churro typical from Madrid.

And by the way, WinterHaven, chocolate a la taza (the very thick chocolate, usually cooked with flour, typical from Spain) is optional with churros, although very common. You can ask for churros without the chocolate in any decent place, just sprinkled with sugar. I can't talk about Donosti, but I know at least a couple places in Bilbao you can do so, and I don't usually go for churros.
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« Reply #151 on: February 15, 2014, 10:51:12 pm »

Oh I know you can order them without, but they're still not the same.

I get homesick for Chile just thinking about them.
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« Reply #152 on: February 16, 2014, 06:23:35 am »

Had porros the other day but they weren't served with chocolate

Sorry, after I stopped laughing I had to correct you. "Porros" are joints, and since chocolate is a common slang for hashish, your sentence means something different that you intended...
"Porras", besides the sticks police carry around, are the kind of thicker, shorter churro typical from Madrid.

And by the way, WinterHaven, chocolate a la taza (the very thick chocolate, usually cooked with flour, typical from Spain) is optional with churros, although very common. You can ask for churros without the chocolate in any decent place, just sprinkled with sugar. I can't talk about Donosti, but I know at least a couple places in Bilbao you can do so, and I don't usually go for churros.


The Mexican version is consumed with Atole a very thick hot porridge-like drink of Native Mesoamerican origin, whose post Conquest version may be of many flavours including chocolate and vanilla and which is made mostly from corn starch (modern version) or corn hominy flour.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atole
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« Reply #153 on: February 27, 2014, 09:10:53 pm »


Within the last few weeks, these posters have shown up in the windows of every family-owned donut shop and bakery in the Detroit area, including the Mexican bakery in the town where I live.
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« Reply #154 on: March 03, 2014, 09:08:57 pm »

Had porros the other day but they weren't served with chocolate
Sorry, after I stopped laughing I had to correct you. "Porros" are joints, and since chocolate is a common slang for hashish, your sentence means something different that you intended...
"Porras", besides the sticks police carry around, are the kind of thicker, shorter churro typical from Madrid.

And by the way, WinterHaven, chocolate a la taza (the very thick chocolate, usually cooked with flour, typical from Spain) is optional with churros, although very common. You can ask for churros without the chocolate in any decent place, just sprinkled with sugar. I can't talk about Donosti, but I know at least a couple places in Bilbao you can do so, and I don't usually go for churros.

haha, I like the mistaken version then xD I'll try not to make that mistake when ordering any then..
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« Reply #155 on: May 09, 2014, 10:34:54 pm »

I think I just invented or re-invented something else.

I'm going to call them "Parmesan Roti,"  Because it's the closest I can think of.

Basically I started without measuring anything, just taking a small (perhaps 1/2 cup) of basic wheat flour and started kneading with a little water and a regular vinaigrette salad dressing (I had no oil, you see?), and then I made a flat pancake, about 4 inches in diameter and made it such that the dough was still sticky (wet), and instead of dusting the pancake with flour I used a thin layer of grated Parmesan cheese.

Then in a pan with two tablespoons of salted butter I applied heat until the butter started smoking at which point I dropped the pancake into the browning butter. Then lowered the heat to medium high and fried each side until deep brown, intermittently flipping to make sure that no side burns.  Once both sides as brown, you want to turn off the heat and continue flipping one or two times until the bread is cooked, and just let the bread cool after that.

Sheer awesomeness as a companion to any food, like pasta.  The vinaigrette does not interfere with the butter, as it just lends garlic and herbs to the taste, and the butter provides all the creaminess in the taste.  Just awesome.

« Last Edit: May 09, 2014, 11:21:21 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #156 on: May 09, 2014, 11:14:10 pm »

I think I just invented or re-invented something else.

I'm going to call them "Parmesan Roti,"  Because it's the closest I can think of.

Basically I started without measuring anything, just taking a small (perhaps 1/2 cup) of basic wheat flour and started kneading with a little water and a regular vinaigrette salad dressing (I had no oil, you see?), and then I made a flat pancake, about 4 inched in diameter and made it such that the dough was still sticky (wet), and instead of dusting the pancake with flour I used a thin layer of grated Parmesan cheese.

Then in a pan with two tablespoons of salted butter I applied heat until the butter started smoking at which point I dropped the pancake into the browning butter. Then lowered the heat to medium high and fried each side until deep brown, intermittently flipping to make sure that no side burns.  Once both sides as brown, you want to turn off the heat and continue flipping one or two times until the bread is cooked, and just let the bread cool after that.

Sheer awesomeness as a companion to any food, like pasta.  The binaigrette does not interfere with the butter, as it just lends garlic and herbs to the taste, and the butter provides all the craminess in the taste.  Just awesome.

Pancakes with vinegar and no baking soda or powder. What kind of texture did they have?
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« Reply #157 on: May 09, 2014, 11:24:44 pm »

At about 1/8-inch thickness they were not pasty (which I'd expect from experience with the acidity of the vinegar), but the outside was very crispy and browned, similar to cheese toast, and the inside looks like a Mexican lard-based wheat flour tortilla or Gordita. If I had made them any thinner, they'd become semi transparent and totally crispy (I guess with a roller, or something like that).  The browned butter really dominates but is complimented by the garlic - you can't taste the acidity of the vinegar, really.  It's very buttery.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2014, 11:28:08 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #158 on: May 10, 2014, 09:09:11 am »

At about 1/8-inch thickness they were not pasty (which I'd expect from experience with the acidity of the vinegar), but the outside was very crispy and browned, similar to cheese toast, and the inside looks like a Mexican lard-based wheat flour tortilla or Gordita. If I had made them any thinner, they'd become semi transparent and totally crispy (I guess with a roller, or something like that).


Aha! Something to try in the tortilla press.


About two decades ago, as a penniless student, I re-invented something.

I had flour, some eggs, some cooking oil. I mixed the eggs and flour to a stiff dough that I formed into small balls around 3/8" to 1/2" in diameter and deep fried them; they swelled up by about 50%, became golden brown and quite light in texture.

The next time I made them, I made the balls slightly bigger, and pressed an indentation into each, which I filled with sweetened red-bean paste (from a can bought in a Chinese supermarket), then closed the dough around the paste to seal it in, and cooked as before.

I'm sure that something this simple already exists, but haven't found it yet.
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« Reply #159 on: May 11, 2014, 01:10:56 am »

Being penniless does help creativity, yes?  Grin
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« Reply #160 on: May 11, 2014, 03:15:35 am »






The next time I made them, I made the balls slightly bigger, and pressed an indentation into each, which I filled with sweetened red-bean paste (from a can bought in a Chinese supermarket), then closed the dough around the paste to seal it in, and cooked as before.

I'm sure that something this simple already exists, but haven't found it yet.
[/quote]

Sounds like a weird version of a jelly donut...
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« Reply #161 on: May 11, 2014, 05:42:23 am »

Quote
The next time I made them, I made the balls slightly bigger, and pressed an indentation into each, which I filled with sweetened red-bean paste (from a can bought in a Chinese supermarket), then closed the dough around the paste to seal it in, and cooked as before.

I'm sure that something this simple already exists, but haven't found it yet.

Sounds like a weird version of a jelly donut...

Well, this sounds to me like an egg-heavy batter, which tends to expand quite a lot with heat (like other egg heavy batters Yorkshire pudding -basically expansion of vapour and a higher surface tension are the method of leavening), and the taste is very eggy (naturally) and can be a tad dry on it's own (save for the grease).

Even though not deep or pan fried, technically you are using a baking method and lots of grease drippings to fry the batter in a baking pan, so we have to add Yorkshire pudding to the list!

Wiki:

Yorkshire Pudding

Quote
When wheat flour began to come into common use for making cakes and puddings, cooks in the north of England devised a means of making use of the fat that dropped into the dripping pan to cook a batter pudding while the meat roasted in the oven. In 1737, a recipe for 'a dripping pudding' was published in The Whole Duty of a Woman

Yorkshire pudding is cooked by pouring a batter made from milk (or water), flour and eggs into preheated, oiled, baking pans, ramekins or muffin tins (in the case of miniature puddings). A basic formula uses 1⁄3 cup flour and 1⁄3 cup liquid per egg.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 05:50:46 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Keith_Beef
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« Reply #162 on: May 11, 2014, 08:15:18 pm »

Quote
The next time I made them, I made the balls slightly bigger, and pressed an indentation into each, which I filled with sweetened red-bean paste (from a can bought in a Chinese supermarket), then closed the dough around the paste to seal it in, and cooked as before.

I'm sure that something this simple already exists, but haven't found it yet.

Sounds like a weird version of a jelly donut...

Well, this sounds to me like an egg-heavy batter, which tends to expand quite a lot with heat (like other egg heavy batters Yorkshire pudding -basically expansion of vapour and a higher surface tension are the method of leavening), and the taste is very eggy (naturally) and can be a tad dry on it's own (save for the grease).

Even though not deep or pan fried, technically you are using a baking method and lots of grease drippings to fry the batter in a baking pan, so we have to add Yorkshire pudding to the list!

Wiki:

Yorkshire Pudding

Quote
When wheat flour began to come into common use for making cakes and puddings, cooks in the north of England devised a means of making use of the fat that dropped into the dripping pan to cook a batter pudding while the meat roasted in the oven. In 1737, a recipe for 'a dripping pudding' was published in The Whole Duty of a Woman

Yorkshire pudding is cooked by pouring a batter made from milk (or water), flour and eggs into preheated, oiled, baking pans, ramekins or muffin tins (in the case of miniature puddings). A basic formula uses 1⁄3 cup flour and 1⁄3 cup liquid per egg.


Yorkshire Pudding batter is much more liquid than the dough-balls that I deep-fried. In fact, Yorkshire Pudding batter is about as runny as English pancake batter; it has milk in it, sometimes a little bit of water or beer.

And of course to be a true Yorkshire Pudding it must be mixed up on Saturday night, left to rest overnight and then on Sunday must be cooked in smoking hot meat dripping.
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« Reply #163 on: May 12, 2014, 03:17:50 am »

True, but I noticed that an egg heavy batter thick or thin has different "rising" properties.  It's rather interesting to watch (I like to experiment, and when I satrted baking for the first time I did an experiment, varying the proportions of ingredients such as a grease, water and eggs.  Very interesting results, so I discovered how to make "powdery and flaky" pastries, how to make bricks  Grin , and how to balance the two to get what I want.  Pasta and dumplings.  Deep fried pastry, boiled and then fried (e.g. pot-stickers), and the permutations threof.  Even puddings made entirely of wheat flour, sugar and cinnamon (I'm poor, remember?).

The egg heavy batters are a bit of magic in how they rise.  But they are often too eggy for my taste, and it needs copious amounts of sugar to counterbalance (or salt, etc.)  Discovering how important the seasoning is in using wheat flour products was a real eye opener. 
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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #164 on: May 12, 2014, 08:38:18 am »

True, but I noticed that an egg heavy batter thick or thin has different "rising" properties.  It's rather interesting to watch (I like to experiment, and when I satrted baking for the first time I did an experiment, varying the proportions of ingredients such as a grease, water and eggs.  Very interesting results, so I discovered how to make "powdery and flaky" pastries, how to make bricks  Grin , and how to balance the two to get what I want.  Pasta and dumplings.  Deep fried pastry, boiled and then fried (e.g. pot-stickers), and the permutations threof.  Even puddings made entirely of wheat flour, sugar and cinnamon (I'm poor, remember?).

The egg heavy batters are a bit of magic in how they rise.  But they are often too eggy for my taste, and it needs copious amounts of sugar to counterbalance (or salt, etc.)  Discovering how important the seasoning is in using wheat flour products was a real eye opener. 

I'm a Yorkshireman, myself, and have been accused on occasion of suffering from the "Yorkshireman's Disease" of having deep pockets, but short arms.

In its home county, the Yorkshire Pudding is traditionally served at midday on Sunday before the roast and the vegetable main course. Supposedly this was to fill the belly with inexpensive food, so that the expensive meat could be served in smaller quantities and still fill everybody's belly.

In some families, the Yorkshire pudding does double-duty as a starter with the gravy and also as a dessert with jam, honey or fruit, so it's important to add neither too much salt (making it less good as a dessert) not too much sugar (spoiling it as a starter).
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« Reply #165 on: May 13, 2014, 07:42:28 am »

Well, I was writing on another thread, when I realized it should probably be posted here... maybe.  The item at hand is Chicharrones de Queso ("Cheese Rinds"), which technically is not a rind, and is NOT a historically typical food from Mexico, but rather the latest fad from Mexico.  You basically take shredded cheese and you fry it on a non-stick surface, forming a rind of sorts... look at the video:

CHICHARRON DE QUESO at ¡Lotería! Grill


The cheese used is Mexican Manchego (not the same as Spanish Manchego). The Mexican Manchego is a cousin of the American Monterrey Jack, but it's a harder, dryer cheese
« Last Edit: May 13, 2014, 08:20:16 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #166 on: May 13, 2014, 04:08:05 pm »

Well, I was writing on another thread, when I realized it shoukd probably be posted here... maybe.  The item at hand is Chicharrones de Queso ("Cheese Rinds"), which technically is no a rind, and is NOT a historically typical food from Mexico, but rather the latest fad from Mexico.  You basically take shredded cheese and you fry it on a non-stick surface, forming a rind of sorts... look at the video:

CHICHARRON DE QUESO at ¡Lotería! Grill

The cheese used is Mexican Manchego (not the same as Spanish Manchego). The Mexican Manchego is a cousin of the American Monterrey Jack, but it's a harder, dryer cheese




I do a similar thing on a paper plate in the microwave. maybe I can take a pic sometime soon and post it here.
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« Reply #167 on: May 15, 2014, 10:40:53 am »


In its home county, the Yorkshire Pudding is traditionally served at midday on Sunday before the roast and the vegetable main course. Supposedly this was to fill the belly with inexpensive food, so that the expensive meat could be served in smaller quantities and still fill everybody's belly.

In some families, the Yorkshire pudding does double-duty as a starter with the gravy and also as a dessert with jam, honey or fruit, so it's important to add neither too much salt (making it less good as a dessert) not too much sugar (spoiling it as a starter).

My Yorkshire born Mum certainly did this - it's one of the best "Sunday Memories' in our family.

We then invented the traditional 'chipping the yorkshires of the oven Tuesday' as we always left some in the oven by accident...
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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #168 on: May 15, 2014, 04:32:02 pm »


In its home county, the Yorkshire Pudding is traditionally served at midday on Sunday before the roast and the vegetable main course. Supposedly this was to fill the belly with inexpensive food, so that the expensive meat could be served in smaller quantities and still fill everybody's belly.

In some families, the Yorkshire pudding does double-duty as a starter with the gravy and also as a dessert with jam, honey or fruit, so it's important to add neither too much salt (making it less good as a dessert) not too much sugar (spoiling it as a starter).

My Yorkshire born Mum certainly did this - it's one of the best "Sunday Memories' in our family.

We then invented the traditional 'chipping the yorkshires of the oven Tuesday' as we always left some in the oven by accident...

We often had to remove the liner from the roof of the oven (a sheet metal plate) because the puddings would rise too much and stick to it…
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« Reply #169 on: May 17, 2014, 12:05:41 am »

I was just remonded that we have not talked about cheese pancakes!

There is this Easter European (Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian and Russian) sweet quark pancake  called Syrniki.

Basically Syrniki are soft pancakes made from quark, flour, eggs, and sugar. The pancaakes are  which are fried, generally in vegetable oil so that the outside becomes crisp, and the center is creamy. They are served for breakfast or dessert.

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« Reply #170 on: May 26, 2014, 10:09:51 pm »

Peanut butter??  Yes. Peanut butter can be made by frying peanuts is oil in a wok and the just grinding with seasoning to a paste:

http://youtu.be/4PAT_TKUO9U
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« Reply #171 on: June 06, 2014, 02:40:08 am »

Crisps, Bhaji, allsorted fritters & Black Pudding

Edited to add "Black Pudding"
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« Reply #172 on: June 06, 2014, 08:19:30 am »

Thnak you Mr. Wells.  Bhaji and Black Pudding were not on the list!
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« Reply #173 on: June 18, 2014, 01:05:57 am »

Here is one that we have not included, an in honour of Brazil hosting the World Cup:

Coxinha  is a large fried dumpling made with shredded chicken, tossed in chicken broth-wheat flour batter and then deep fried.   The filling may include tomato sauce, onion, parsley, scallions, and catupiry cheese.  The dumpling is shaped like a chicken drumstick, and legend has it that it was invented by a chef for the mentally ill child of Princess Isabel of Brazil (1846-1921), who would not eat any other part of the chicken but the drumstick. Empress Teresa Cristina, later found about the dish and it became the favourite dish of the court.

« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 01:08:08 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #174 on: June 19, 2015, 03:09:35 pm »

Acarajé is a dish made from peeled black-eyed peas formed into a ball and then deep-fried in dendê (palm oil). It is found in West African and Brazilian cuisines. The dish is traditionally encountered in Brazil's northeastern state of Bahia, especially in the city of Salvador, often as street food, and is also found in many countries in West Africa, including Nigeria, Ghana, Togo, Benin, Mali, Gambia.

It is served split in half and stuffed with vatapá and caruru – spicy pastes made from shrimp, ground cashews, palm oil and other ingredients.[1] The most common way of eating acarajé is splitting it in half, pouring vatapá and/or caruru, a salad made out of green and red tomatoes, fried shrimps and homemade hot pepper sauce. A vegetarian version is typically served with hot peppers and green tomatoes.

Akara (as it is known in southwest and southeast Nigeria) a recipe taken to Brazil by the slaves from the West African coast. It is called "akara" by the Igbo people of south-eastern Nigeria and the Yoruba people of south-western Nigeria, "kosai" by the Hausa people of Nigeria or "koose" in Ghana and is a popular breakfast dish, eaten with millet or corn pudding. In Nigeria, Akara is commonly eaten with bread, "Ogi" (or "Eko"), a type of Cornmeal made with fine corn flour.

"'Akara'" is originally a recipe by the Yoruba people of South western Nigeria which has overtime being adopted by the rest of the country. Akara used to play a significant role in the Yoruba culture, as it was only prepared when a person who has come of Age (70 and Above) dies. It was usually fried in large quantity and distributed across every household close to the deceased. "Akara" also used to be prepared in large as a sign of victory, when warriors came back victorious from war.The women, especially the wives of the Warriors were to fry "Akara" and distribute it to the whole village.

Today in Bahia, Brazil, most street vendors who serve acarajé are women, easily recognizable by their all-white cotton dresses and headscarves and caps. The image of these women, often simply called baianas, frequently appears in artwork from the region of Bahia. Acarajé, however, is available outside of the state of Bahia as well, including the streets of its neighbor state Sergipe, and the markets of Rio de Janeiro.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acaraj%C3%A9
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