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Author Topic: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~  (Read 34784 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #125 on: January 20, 2014, 04:55:15 am »

*snip*

Lagasse, Prudhomme… in the same bucket at chef Boyardee: over-rated.

Lagasse is just a loud-mouthed TV presenter who can cook a bit.

Put him on a Zeppelin that's just snagged a big Kraken, and what would he do with it? "Kick it up a notch" by throwing on some "Punch ya daddy" powder? Pfffffff.

*snip*


As I was looking at the Blackened fish recipes I encountered Prudhomme's name as he's credited to popularising Blackened Fish in the 1980s.  Funny you mentioned Lagasse and Prudhomme.  It turns out they both have a close relationship:

Wiki:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Prudhomme

Quote
He opened his first restaurant in Opelousas in 1957, a hamburger restaurant called Big Daddy O's Patio. The restaurant went out of business in nine months, which also saw the end of his first marriage.[1] He became a magazine seller initially in New Orleans, and afterwards a number of restaurant jobs took him around the country. During this period he began creating his own spice mixes, and gave them away to customers.[2] In 1970 he moved back to New Orleans to work as a sous chef at the Le Pavilion Hotel. He left after a short while to open Clarence Dupuy's restaurant Maison du Puy. While there, he met his second wife, Kay Hinrichs, who worked at the restaurant as a waitress.[2] In 1975 Prudhomme left to become executive chef at the restaurant Commander's Palace.[1] Chef Paul turned the unsuccessful Garden District restaurant into a world-class destination for food.

In 1979, he and his wife, Kay Prudhomme, opened K-Paul's Louisiana Kitchen in the French Quarter of New Orleans.[3] The restaurant was named as a portmanteau of their names, with Paul working as head chef and Kay as restaurant manager.[4] For a while he attempted to operate the restaurant whilst still working at Commander's Palace, but the demand in his new restaurant was such that he moved to work there full-time and also hired Emeril Lagasse to work in the kitchen.[2] In 1980, he was made a Chevalier (Knight) of the French Ordre National du Mérite Agricole in honor of his work with Cajun and Creole cuisines.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackening_%28cooking%29
http://www.wikihow.com/Blacken-Fish

If you forgive 13 minutes of a lovely heavy American Southern drawl in a very friendly voice, this is a great dinner...  Blackened fish, Shrimp Scampi and Hush Puppies -all fried.
Blackened fish
« Last Edit: January 20, 2014, 04:59:51 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #126 on: January 20, 2014, 05:38:25 am »

I'm hungry now, all this food looks amazing..

One I tried after seeing it on Saturday morning kitchen is bananas deep fried in tempura batter, with some good Cornish ice cream and homemade butterscotch sauce (which it turns out it's basically liquid fudge?). So good..also it's bananas so definitely healthy. Yep.



What would a New Orleans dinner be without a good dessert??  For that we have a dish that partially involves frying bananas in butter, namely Brennan's Restaurant's original Bananas Foster.  Basically long halves of bananas, fried in a butter caramel sauce made of brown sugar in butter, rum, and banana liqueur, and then flambéed to finish it off.  Goes great served with vanilla ice cream.

(Video)
http://abc.go.com/shows/the-chew/news/fun-stuff/brenans-bananas-foster
http://www.brennansneworleans.com/r_bananasfoster.html

Speaking of which, we haven't elaborated much on Fried Bananas' brothers, the Fried Plantains.


Fried Plantains

The Plantain, technically is the same fruit as a banana, but happens to be much starchier and larger version of the banana with a definitely savoury flavour, as it has much less sugar.   The plantain resembles green bananas but ripe plantains turn black  black with a taste that changes  at every stage of development. The interior colour of the fruit will remain creamy, yellowish or lightly pink. When the peel is green to yellow, the flavour of the flesh is bland and its texture is starchy. As the peel changes to brown or black, it has a sweeter flavour and more of a banana aroma, but still keeps a firm shape when cooked. The way to get plants which produce plantains is to cross two types of bananas, Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana. Plantains can only be eaten cooked, not raw, as it is typical with bananas, and they are much harder than their sweet counterparts.

Variations on Fried plantains are very popular dishes in Africa and the Central American Caribbean where there is a strong tradition of banana cultivation.

In the video you can see how much harder plantains are than bananas
How To Make Tostones.



« Last Edit: January 20, 2014, 10:59:29 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Keith_Beef
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« Reply #127 on: January 20, 2014, 11:15:45 am »

Speaking of which, we haven't elaborated much on Fried Bananas' brothers, the Fried Plantains.


Fried Plantains

The Plantain, technically is the same fruit as a banana, but happens to be much starchier and larger version of the banana with a definitely savoury flavour, as it has much less sugar.   The plantain resembles green bananas but ripe plantains turn black  black with a taste that changes  at every stage of development. The interior colour of the fruit will remain creamy, yellowish or lightly pink. When the peel is green to yellow, the flavour of the flesh is bland and its texture is starchy. As the peel changes to brown or black, it has a sweeter flavour and more of a banana aroma, but still keeps a firm shape when cooked. The way to get plants which produce plantains is to cross two types of bananas, Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana. Plantains can only be eaten cooked, not raw, as it is typical with bananas, and they are much harder than their sweet counterparts.

Variations on Fried plantains are very popular dishes in Africa and the Central American Caribbean where there is a strong tradition of banana cultivation.

I love tostones, so do the kids.

We had them for the first time when we went to Puerto Rico for a week, and I even got to go into the kitchen of a tiny little roadside restaurant in the forest and the woman showed me how to prepare them. I've made them a couple of times since, but they never came out quite as good as hers. The guy in the video has a slightly different method, and it looks both simpler and better.

Anybody know what his accent is? He has pronunciations that are similar to both the US and Jamaican English… I wonder if he is from Trinidad?
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #128 on: January 20, 2014, 07:54:50 pm »

Speaking of which, we haven't elaborated much on Fried Bananas' brothers, the Fried Plantains.


Fried Plantains

The Plantain, technically is the same fruit as a banana, but happens to be much starchier and larger version of the banana with a definitely savoury flavour, as it has much less sugar.   The plantain resembles green bananas but ripe plantains turn black  black with a taste that changes  at every stage of development. The interior colour of the fruit will remain creamy, yellowish or lightly pink. When the peel is green to yellow, the flavour of the flesh is bland and its texture is starchy. As the peel changes to brown or black, it has a sweeter flavour and more of a banana aroma, but still keeps a firm shape when cooked. The way to get plants which produce plantains is to cross two types of bananas, Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana. Plantains can only be eaten cooked, not raw, as it is typical with bananas, and they are much harder than their sweet counterparts.

Variations on Fried plantains are very popular dishes in Africa and the Central American Caribbean where there is a strong tradition of banana cultivation.

I love tostones, so do the kids.

We had them for the first time when we went to Puerto Rico for a week, and I even got to go into the kitchen of a tiny little roadside restaurant in the forest and the woman showed me how to prepare them. I've made them a couple of times since, but they never came out quite as good as hers. The guy in the video has a slightly different method, and it looks both simpler and better.

Anybody know what his accent is? He has pronunciations that are similar to both the US and Jamaican English… I wonder if he is from Trinidad?
I'm under the impression that he has lived in the US for a very long time. That is a hybrid accent.  I was born American I was raised in Mexico and spoke Spanish as a first language.  Yet after all this time some Spanish speakers are telling me I'm starting  to have an "American drawl" in my Spanish...  could be true.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #129 on: January 26, 2014, 09:21:02 pm »

Here's a nice list of items, most of which have not been written down.
I'll explore some of these later.

http://home.comcast.net/~osoono/ethnic-doughs.htm

BTW I've spotted an error already in that list, it's sopapillas, not sopaipillas.

the Sopapilla can really be different depending on which region of Latin America you are talking about.  Even within a country it varies from region to region with very different meanings.  In it's most generalised form it's a type of sweetened fried bread, but it can be a type of doughnut (South America), a puff pastry and covered in sugar granulated or caramelized similar to a sweetened Beignet (USA/Northern Mexico), a or thin and crispy fritter with syrup on top of it (Mexico).

A similar dish in Mexico/Central/South America is Buñuelos (I may have touched on this before), a derivative of a doughnut like fried filled dough, but whose meaning is equally elusive as you can also find pancake shaped versions, and the thin crispy variety as well as filled perfectly round doughnuts.

From Wiki:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bu%C3%B1uelo
Colombian Buñuelos


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sopaipilla
American (New Mexico/Texas) Sopapillas


« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 06:04:00 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
RJBowman
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« Reply #130 on: January 27, 2014, 02:58:03 am »

I've got a question about cider mill donuts:



These are ubiquitous in the fall at orchards in Michigan, and maybe in surrounding states. They are cake donuts (baking powder or soda, never yeast) covered in granulated sugar and cinnamon. The orchards that sell these donuts also sell cider, which in America means unfiltered juice from crushed apples.

Can anyone tell me, is this a regional think, or are these available coast to coast in the fall?
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« Reply #131 on: January 31, 2014, 09:51:22 pm »

I've got a question about cider mill donuts:



These are ubiquitous in the fall at orchards in Michigan, and maybe in surrounding states. They are cake donuts (baking powder or soda, never yeast) covered in granulated sugar and cinnamon. The orchards that sell these donuts also sell cider, which in America means unfiltered juice from crushed apples.

Can anyone tell me, is this a regional think, or are these available coast to coast in the fall?


Well, I can definitely tell you that they aren't readily available in southern New Mexico, at least not as far as I've seen (then again, it's pretty difficult to find anything not steeped in Hispanic culture down here [not that that's a bad thing]).
I do remember being able to get them in the 4 Corners area in the fall, though, but again there are quite a few orchards in the northern New Mexico/southern Colorado region.
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« Reply #132 on: February 04, 2014, 10:09:18 pm »

I've got a question about cider mill donuts:



These are ubiquitous in the fall at orchards in Michigan, and maybe in surrounding states. They are cake donuts (baking powder or soda, never yeast) covered in granulated sugar and cinnamon. The orchards that sell these donuts also sell cider, which in America means unfiltered juice from crushed apples.

Can anyone tell me, is this a regional think, or are these available coast to coast in the fall?


Well, I can definitely tell you that they aren't readily available in southern New Mexico, at least not as far as I've seen (then again, it's pretty difficult to find anything not steeped in Hispanic culture down here [not that that's a bad thing]).
I do remember being able to get them in the 4 Corners area in the fall, though, but again there are quite a few orchards in the northern New Mexico/southern Colorado region.

Genus 1 (ref. topology) Churros?  Grin

A topologist is someone who can't tell his donut from his coffee mug.  But he will definitely know the difference between churros and doughnuts....
« Last Edit: February 04, 2014, 10:13:30 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #133 on: February 05, 2014, 12:49:34 pm »

Genus 1 (ref. topology) Churros?  Grin

A topologist is someone who can't tell his donut from his coffee mug.  But he will definitely know the difference between churros and doughnuts....

Who wouldn't know the difference between churros and doughnouts? Churros and porras, that's a confusion I can understand (it's a matter of scale):
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« Reply #134 on: February 05, 2014, 03:43:40 pm »

A topologist is someone who can't tell his donut from his coffee mug.  But he will definitely know the difference between churros and doughnuts....

The doughnut shops in my area sell doughnuts in two distinct topological shapes; with a hole through it, and without a hole through it. Without a hole through it is usually filled with jelly or custard.
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« Reply #135 on: February 05, 2014, 08:06:32 pm »

Genus 1 (ref. topology) Churros?  Grin

A topologist is someone who can't tell his donut from his coffee mug.  But he will definitely know the difference between churros and doughnuts....

Who wouldn't know the difference between churros and doughnouts? Churros and porras, that's a confusion I can understand (it's a matter of scale):



I haven't come across porras, but I miss the Chilean way of serving churros, straight out of the boiling oil with a dusting of sugar. Dipping them in chocolate is nice but just not the same.
(And this is from a chocolate addict so....)
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« Reply #136 on: February 07, 2014, 02:52:17 am »

Genus 1 (ref. topology) Churros?  Grin

A topologist is someone who can't tell his donut from his coffee mug.  But he will definitely know the difference between churros and doughnuts....

Who wouldn't know the difference between churros and doughnouts? Churros and porras, that's a confusion I can understand (it's a matter of scale):



I haven't come across porras, but I miss the Chilean way of serving churros, straight out of the boiling oil with a dusting of sugar. Dipping them in chocolate is nice but just not the same.
(And this is from a chocolate addict so....)


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Churro

Have you been in Chile?  Funny that is the Mexican way of serving them as well...  Had to be very careful not to burn myself.  The thing is that they turn hard and chewy if you let them cool for a long time (overnight).  The only way to eat them is freshly fried...

If I get my way I may be back in Mexico soon.  Then I'll eat all the churros I want at the 7:00 pm merienda

2005 GNU Documentation License - Dominik
« Last Edit: February 07, 2014, 03:00:46 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
WinterHaven
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« Reply #137 on: February 07, 2014, 01:10:34 pm »


Have you been in Chile?  Funny that is the Mexican way of serving them as well...  Had to be very careful not to burn myself.  The thing is that they turn hard and chewy if you let them cool for a long time (overnight).  The only way to eat them is freshly fried...

If I get my way I may be back in Mexico soon.  Then I'll eat all the churros I want at the 7:00 pm merienda

2005 GNU Documentation License - Dominik



I used to live in Chile, and I think that way of serving them is popular across South America - I can remember seeing them in Argentina too.

You're right about them going hard though, you do have to eat them fairly quickly.
(It never seemed to be a problem Smiley)
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RJBowman
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« Reply #138 on: February 07, 2014, 09:04:13 pm »

The thing is that they turn hard and chewy if you let them cool for a long time (overnight).  The only way to eat them is freshly fried...

Same way with New Orleans Beignets.
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« Reply #139 on: February 08, 2014, 11:51:24 pm »

My Dears,
Does anyone have an Altoids tin with Altoids in it? All the grease. . . . Pardon me.
In Hawaii we have Portuguese fried doughnuts rolled in sugar, called Malasadas. Like most fried foods, they are delectable for exactly two minutes after cooking, and then congeal. We also have Japanese tempura and banana fritters.
Please do not eat all at once.
C.W.
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« Reply #140 on: February 09, 2014, 11:46:41 am »

My Dears,
Does anyone have an Altoids tin with Altoids in it? All the grease. . . . Pardon me.
In Hawaii we have Portuguese fried doughnuts rolled in sugar, called Malasadas. Like most fried foods, they are delectable for exactly two minutes after cooking, and then congeal. We also have Japanese tempura and banana fritters.
Please do not eat all at once.
C.W.


Malasada sounds like something that has been badly fried.
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WinterHaven
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« Reply #141 on: February 09, 2014, 11:03:21 pm »

My Dears,
Does anyone have an Altoids tin with Altoids in it? All the grease. . . . Pardon me.
In Hawaii we have Portuguese fried doughnuts rolled in sugar, called Malasadas. Like most fried foods, they are delectable for exactly two minutes after cooking, and then congeal. We also have Japanese tempura and banana fritters.
Please do not eat all at once.
C.W.


Malasada sounds like something that has been badly fried.

If my memory of Chilean Spanish serves correctly it would mean bad barbecue.

I also remember an alternative, similar to churros but not identical. Called calzadas rotos I believe, strips of dough twisted together and fried.

The name means twisted knickers which always gave me a chuckle
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Camellia Wingnut
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« Reply #142 on: February 10, 2014, 12:32:30 am »

My Dears,
Wikipedia defines the word as "mal assada" or undercooked.
This picture shows malasadas with Hawaiian fillings including guava and coconut.
C.W.
P.S. These are the famous Leonard's malasadas.
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WinterHaven
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« Reply #143 on: February 10, 2014, 09:50:48 am »

Leonard%27s_malasadas.jpg[/img][/center] This picture shows malasadas with Hawaiian fillings including guava and coconut.


But... they have fruit in them? Aha, so they are healthy.
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Camellia Wingnut
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« Reply #144 on: February 10, 2014, 10:49:16 pm »

My Dear,
Of course! Why, it's just like taking Vitamin C. A chore, I know, but one must think of one's health.
C.W.
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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #145 on: February 11, 2014, 02:49:58 pm »

My Dear,
Of course! Why, it's just like taking Vitamin C. A chore, I know, but one must think of one's health.
C.W.

I don't like Gin, so no Gin and Tonic for me.

But I'm very partial to Rum and Lime: an ideal source of Vitamin C to keep the dreaded Scurvy at bay. Alternated with just Tonic on its own for the Quinine.
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Camellia Wingnut
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Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #146 on: February 11, 2014, 11:21:19 pm »

My Dear Sir,
Indeed, the lime is for scurvy, and the quinine for fevers like malaria. Consider the alcohol a sort of disinfectant, and what you have is virtually medicine!
Tally Ho!
C.W.
P.S. Has anyone mentioned what we call potstickers? They are Chinese, (perhaps the original of ravioli, just as noodles were the original of spaghetti, an import attributed to Marco Polo) - where was I? Tibetans call them mo-mo. They are sometimes called dumplings, but the shell is thin; they are stuffed with pork, chicken, beef, and boiled or fried. When fried, they are delicious dipped in hot sauce.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2014, 11:31:00 pm by Camellia Wingnut » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #147 on: February 13, 2014, 12:21:54 am »

My Dears,
Does anyone have an Altoids tin with Altoids in it? All the grease. . . . Pardon me.
In Hawaii we have Portuguese fried doughnuts rolled in sugar, called Malasadas. Like most fried foods, they are delectable for exactly two minutes after cooking, and then congeal. We also have Japanese tempura and banana fritters.
Please do not eat all at once.
C.W.


Malasada sounds like something that has been badly fried.

If my memory of Chilean Spanish serves correctly it would mean bad barbecue.

I also remember an alternative, similar to churros but not identical. Called calzadas rotos I believe, strips of dough twisted together and fried.

The name means twisted knickers which always gave me a chuckle

Ah!  Close, but no cigar.. er...  Calzado, would relate to footware (actually that is the literal translation:  (zapato = shoe, calzado = footware).  Calzon would relate to underwear...

Roto = broken (in this case torn).  So calzado roto, would literally mean torn shoes.  Still, who wants to eat a shoe?
« Last Edit: February 13, 2014, 12:26:02 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
WinterHaven
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« Reply #148 on: February 13, 2014, 12:53:58 am »

yes, I think you are right, Calzonos rotos. Twisted knickers, and very good they were too.

 
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« Reply #149 on: February 15, 2014, 05:13:03 pm »

Genus 1 (ref. topology) Churros?  Grin

A topologist is someone who can't tell his donut from his coffee mug.  But he will definitely know the difference between churros and doughnuts....

Who wouldn't know the difference between churros and doughnouts? Churros and porras, that's a confusion I can understand (it's a matter of scale):



I haven't come across porras, but I miss the Chilean way of serving churros, straight out of the boiling oil with a dusting of sugar. Dipping them in chocolate is nice but just not the same.
(And this is from a chocolate addict so....)


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Churro

Have you been in Chile?  Funny that is the Mexican way of serving them as well...  Had to be very careful not to burn myself.  The thing is that they turn hard and chewy if you let them cool for a long time (overnight).  The only way to eat them is freshly fried...

If I get my way I may be back in Mexico soon.  Then I'll eat all the churros I want at the 7:00 pm merienda

2005 GNU Documentation License - Dominik



I had churros for the first time the other day as I'm in Spain now, and have heard great things about that food.. Just seemed kind of greasy and burny and bleh.. Had porros the other day but they weren't served with chocolate, I imagine those would be way nicer with the dip. They're pretty much what I imagine churros would be (Are they just long donuts?)
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