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Author Topic: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~  (Read 34775 times)
Mercury Wells
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« Reply #100 on: January 11, 2014, 09:26:10 pm »


 The penalty instead is finding another fried food...


Fish Cakes

Laverbread

Bubble & Squeak

Fried Eggs

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Hopefully my penance has been served?

« Last Edit: January 11, 2014, 09:31:29 pm by Mercury Wells » Logged

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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #101 on: January 11, 2014, 11:41:51 pm »

Crack a half dozen eggs into a bowl. Add as much flour as necessary to make a thick dough, and form into balls.

Set a pan of oil heating on the stove.

Take each ball of dough, press a deep indentation into it and fill it with sweet red-bean paste, then close up the dough around the paste.

Fry the filled dough balls, never adding so many at a time that the oil cools below boiling point.

As you take the balls from the oil, put them on a draining rack in a warm oven until they are all cooked and ready to serve with a sauce made from hot chilli sauce and soy sauce.
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« Reply #102 on: January 12, 2014, 03:51:00 am »


 The penalty instead is finding another fried food...


Fish Cakes

Laverbread

Bubble & Squeak

Fried Eggs

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Hopefully my penance has been served?




Indeed, on account of Laverbread and Fishcakes... You are hereby released.   Cheesy
« Last Edit: January 12, 2014, 04:02:11 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #103 on: January 12, 2014, 04:45:45 am »

This variation on Yorkshire fishcakes looks particularly interesting:

Wiki:
Quote
In Yorkshire, England, The “Yorkshire fishcake” is a variation traditionally served in many fish and chip shops in South Yorkshire, parts of West Yorkshire and Humberside. It consists of two slices of potato (sometimes parboiled), with offcuts of fish in between, deep fried in batter.[3] Yorkshire fishcakes can also be known as scallop fishcakes, or fish patties. TV chef Brian Turner has made the recipe available via his website.[4] Another variation of the fishcake is the parsley cake which is sold in some fish and chip shops in and around Castleford, West Yorkshire, England. It consists of minced fish, mashed potato and fresh parsley, coated in breadcrumbs and deep fried.



http://uktv.co.uk/food/recipe/aid/517551


Either in this thread or another I do remember we have touched on the subject of Ham and Cheese Sandwiches like the Croque-Mosieur, but we have not discussed the Monte Cristo Sandwich, a battered and deep fried variant which is a breakfast favourite in the US:

Basically, you take a French Croque-monsieur. made with Emmental or Gruyère cheese amd then dip it in egg batter and deep fry.  The finished product is sprinkled with powdered sugar or even maple syrup and treated like French Toast or served with fruit preserves.


http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/saras-secrets/monte-cristo-sandwich-recipe/index.html
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #104 on: January 12, 2014, 11:11:54 am »


Indeed, on account of Laverbread and Fishcakes... You are hereby released.   Cheesy

Thank you.  Cheesy
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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #105 on: January 12, 2014, 01:48:44 pm »

This variation on Yorkshire fishcakes looks particularly interesting:

Wiki:
Quote
In Yorkshire, England, The “Yorkshire fishcake” is a variation traditionally served in many fish and chip shops in South Yorkshire, parts of West Yorkshire and Humberside. It consists of two slices of potato (sometimes parboiled), with offcuts of fish in between, deep fried in batter.[3] Yorkshire fishcakes can also be known as scallop fishcakes, or fish patties. TV chef Brian Turner has made the recipe available via his website.[4] Another variation of the fishcake is the parsley cake which is sold in some fish and chip shops in and around Castleford, West Yorkshire, England. It consists of minced fish, mashed potato and fresh parsley, coated in breadcrumbs and deep fried.


That's not a "variation", that's a proper fishcake. The better ones don't use "offcuts" of fish, it's a circle of good fish fillet. The offcuts are then flaked, mixed with herbs, made into a disc shape, covered in breadcrumbs and fried to give a "rissole".
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« Reply #106 on: January 12, 2014, 02:37:37 pm »

Buffalo Wings !!

Does any one have a good recipe for that ? ( The sauce in particular )


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« Reply #107 on: January 12, 2014, 02:46:08 pm »

I used to eat deep fried pies, you can get them from any decent(?) chippy. Also battered burgers (battered battenburg burgers!) and deep fried pizza.


I am not big into fried stuff myself but  I do like fried black pudding ( battered of course ) , the worst thing I heard of being fried was those cadbury creme eggs you get in the UK.

UGH !!
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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #108 on: January 12, 2014, 04:31:42 pm »

Buffalo Wings !!
Does any one have a good recipe for that ? ( The sauce in particular )


I'd forgotten about those!

I used to have six of them as a starter almost every day in the company canteen (unless there was something better, though it's hard to get better than wings).

Colleagues used to watch me eat them, with knife and fork, and get the bones perfectly clean of all meat. I explained that it was my years of training in veterinary school, and experience as a surgeon treating prize competition fowl.

http://americanfood.about.com/od/appetizersandsoups/r/bufchicwing.htm
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« Reply #109 on: January 12, 2014, 09:39:31 pm »

But with wings, really its all about the taste, and not so much the meat.  Reminds me of crawfish.  A cost analysis reveals it takes way too much effort to remove such a small amount of meat from the shell!


Fried Crayfish/Crawfish salad Creole/Louisiana style from Chef Emeril Lagasse(this has to be good)

Crayfish (know as crawfish in Southern US) are fresh-water tiny crustaceans very closely related to the lobster and common in the bayou, along the Gulf of Mexico.  The meat is very sweet, even more so than lobster, but their size is very small, usually smaller than shrimp.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crayfish
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-live/fried-crawfish-salad-recipe/index.html
>>>Excellent photos of various ways of preparing crawfish/crayfish (all copyrighgted so no hot links):
http://www.foodographer.net/tag/crayfish/

Also have we mentioned Fried Soft-Shell Crabs?

http://www.bluecrab.info/frying_softs.htm
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/fried-soft-shell-crab-poboys-recipe/index.html
« Last Edit: January 12, 2014, 09:50:03 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Keith_Beef
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« Reply #110 on: January 12, 2014, 11:10:40 pm »

But with wings, really its all about the taste, and not so much the meat.  Reminds me of crawfish.  A cost analysis reveals it takes way too much effort to remove such a small amount of meat from the shell!


Fried Crayfish/Crawfish salad Creole/Louisiana style from Chef Emeril Lagasse(this has to be good)

Crayfish (know as crawfish in Southern US) are fresh-water tiny crustaceans very closely related to the lobster and common in the bayou, along the Gulf of Mexico.  The meat is very sweet, even more so than lobster, but their size is very small, usually smaller than shrimp.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crayfish
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-live/fried-crawfish-salad-recipe/index.html
>>>Excellent photos of various ways of preparing crawfish/crayfish (all copyrighgted so no hot links):
http://www.foodographer.net/tag/crayfish/

Also have we mentioned Fried Soft-Shell Crabs?

http://www.bluecrab.info/frying_softs.htm
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/fried-soft-shell-crab-poboys-recipe/index.html



I love crayfish, but I agree that they are a lot of work.

Lagasse, Prudhomme… in the same bucket at chef Boyardee: over-rated.

Lagasse is just a loud-mouthed TV presenter who can cook a bit.

Put him on a Zeppelin that's just snagged a big Kraken, and what would he do with it? "Kick it up a notch" by throwing on some "Punch ya daddy" powder? Pfffffff.

I never really got into soft shelled or blue crab either. Over here in France, they have "étrilles" (swimming crabs) that are very similar. But usually you get just one on a big platter of seafood, and it's mainly for decoration. There is a little bit of edible flesh, but not much. I'd rather have just one crab claw (from what the Americans call a "Dungeness crab") that four blue or soft shelled crabs.

Favourites, though, in no particular order, are: Alaskan or Kamchatkan king crab, oysters, whelks and winkles (when they are good), mussels (I remember cleaning them when I was small, and pulling pea-crabs from the shells) and testacules octopus tentacles.
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« Reply #111 on: January 12, 2014, 11:56:27 pm »

But with wings, really its all about the taste, and not so much the meat.  Reminds me of crawfish.  A cost analysis reveals it takes way too much effort to remove such a small amount of meat from the shell!


Fried Crayfish/Crawfish salad Creole/Louisiana style from Chef Emeril Lagasse(this has to be good)

Crayfish (know as crawfish in Southern US) are fresh-water tiny crustaceans very closely related to the lobster and common in the bayou, along the Gulf of Mexico.  The meat is very sweet, even more so than lobster, but their size is very small, usually smaller than shrimp.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crayfish
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-live/fried-crawfish-salad-recipe/index.html
>>>Excellent photos of various ways of preparing crawfish/crayfish (all copyrighgted so no hot links):
http://www.foodographer.net/tag/crayfish/

Also have we mentioned Fried Soft-Shell Crabs?

http://www.bluecrab.info/frying_softs.htm
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/fried-soft-shell-crab-poboys-recipe/index.html



I love crayfish, but I agree that they are a lot of work.

Lagasse, Prudhomme… in the same bucket at chef Boyardee: over-rated.

Lagasse is just a loud-mouthed TV presenter who can cook a bit.

Put him on a Zeppelin that's just snagged a big Kraken, and what would he do with it? "Kick it up a notch" by throwing on some "Punch ya daddy" powder? Pfffffff.

I never really got into soft shelled or blue crab either. Over here in France, they have "étrilles" (swimming crabs) that are very similar. But usually you get just one on a big platter of seafood, and it's mainly for decoration. There is a little bit of edible flesh, but not much. I'd rather have just one crab claw (from what the Americans call a "Dungeness crab") that four blue or soft shelled crabs.

Favourites, though, in no particular order, are: Alaskan or Kamchatkan king crab, oysters, whelks and winkles (when they are good), mussels (I remember cleaning them when I was small, and pulling pea-crabs from the shells) and testacules octopus tentacles.


The thing with Legasse is that he's Portuguese-American from Massachusetts Pennsylvania and the area around Connecticut, so no direct link to Louisiana, though he has many restaurants including New Orleans (Emeril's, Emeril's Delmonico) and brags a lot.  Sadly these newer restaurants are more popular with tourists (as far back as 2003 when I was there) than the traditional 100+ year old restaurants in New Orleans like Antoine's (1840)  http://www.antoines.com/

To be honest, the phenomenon is partly due to the fact that food has evolved with time.  Fancy food is much fancier today than it was 100 years ago. The last time I was at Antoine’s, the menu was good but not really outstanding compared to the latest and priciest around the world


http://www.nola.com/dining-guide/index.ssf/2012/04/100_great_new_orleans_restaura.html
« Last Edit: January 13, 2014, 12:39:40 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #112 on: January 13, 2014, 12:06:14 am »

Gouda-filled Beignets from Bouligny Tavern in New Orleans

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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #113 on: January 13, 2014, 09:55:34 am »

Gouda-filled Beignets from Bouligny Tavern in New Orleans


Looks delicious.

I think the best fried food I had in Norleans was the buffalo bullfrog legs that my son ordered. Much better than the small, imported (from Indonesia) frog legs that you get here in France.
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« Reply #114 on: January 13, 2014, 12:51:15 pm »

Gouda-filled Beignets from Bouligny Tavern in New Orleans



Looks delicious.

I think the best fried food I had in Norleans was the buffalo bullfrog legs that my son ordered. Much better than the small, imported (from Indonesia) frog legs that you get here in France.


By the way, a lot of this food is historical to the Victorian Period, you may not have seen this thread:

Victorian food brands still extant
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,35567.0.html

Between myself (US/Mexico/Japan) and yereverluvinunclebert (UK), we maintain at least 4 lists of historical food brands from the rise of the industrial era, but which you can still buy today in supermarkets (make sure to read the updated lists before contributing, as we have compiled a lot of Victorian Era /Belle Epoch / Meiji Period and Post Mex. Revolutionary periods food brands).  Perhaps you know of a few French or Central European brands not listed.

The non-factory made food, whic includes fresh meat produce and other items obtainable in an open traditional market fall under this (much underappreciated) thread:

The Victorian Vittle Market Available Today
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,35754.0.html
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« Reply #115 on: January 13, 2014, 01:15:38 pm »

But with wings, really its all about the taste, and not so much the meat.  Reminds me of crawfish.  A cost analysis reveals it takes way too much effort to remove such a small amount of meat from the shell!


Fried Crayfish/Crawfish salad Creole/Louisiana style from Chef Emeril Lagasse(this has to be good)

Crayfish (know as crawfish in Southern US) are fresh-water tiny crustaceans very closely related to the lobster and common in the bayou, along the Gulf of Mexico.  The meat is very sweet, even more so than lobster, but their size is very small, usually smaller than shrimp.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crayfish
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-live/fried-crawfish-salad-recipe/index.html
>>>Excellent photos of various ways of preparing crawfish/crayfish (all copyrighgted so no hot links):
http://www.foodographer.net/tag/crayfish/

Also have we mentioned Fried Soft-Shell Crabs?

http://www.bluecrab.info/frying_softs.htm
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/fried-soft-shell-crab-poboys-recipe/index.html



I love crayfish, but I agree that they are a lot of work.

Lagasse, Prudhomme… in the same bucket at chef Boyardee: over-rated.

Lagasse is just a loud-mouthed TV presenter who can cook a bit.

Put him on a Zeppelin that's just snagged a big Kraken, and what would he do with it? "Kick it up a notch" by throwing on some "Punch ya daddy" powder? Pfffffff.

I never really got into soft shelled or blue crab either. Over here in France, they have "étrilles" (swimming crabs) that are very similar. But usually you get just one on a big platter of seafood, and it's mainly for decoration. There is a little bit of edible flesh, but not much. I'd rather have just one crab claw (from what the Americans call a "Dungeness crab") that four blue or soft shelled crabs.

Favourites, though, in no particular order, are: Alaskan or Kamchatkan king crab, oysters, whelks and winkles (when they are good), mussels (I remember cleaning them when I was small, and pulling pea-crabs from the shells) and testacules octopus tentacles.


I'll pass on octopus but I agree with the rest and about the wing sauce , its so good i honestly think you could eat just about anything in it and not care..

Love Alaskan crab as opposed to reg two claw deal you get, and whelks are something I used to regularly eat whenever I visited Skye.

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« Reply #116 on: January 14, 2014, 08:14:33 am »

(I remember cleaning them when I was small, and pulling pea-crabs from the shells) and testacules octopus tentacles.


Speaking of testicles....  The Spanish brought a custom to the Americas, and it seems that independently some in America go the idea of adapting it to fried food:

US/Canada: "Rocky Mountain Oysters" (US) or Prarie Oysters (Canada)  Grin
I'll let Wiki do the talking....
Quote
Rocky Mountain oysters are bull calf testicles used for human consumption. Sometimes pig or sheep testicles are used.

They are often deep-fried after being peeled, coated in flour, pepper and salt, and sometimes pounded flat. This delicacy is most often served as an appetizer[1] with a cocktail sauce dip.


It is a well-known novelty dish in parts of the American West and Western Canada where cattle ranching is prevalent and castration of young animals is common ("prairie oysters" is the preferred name in Canada, where they may be served in a demi-glace, not deep-fried).[2] In Oklahoma and North Texas, they are sometimes called calf fries but only if taken from very young animals.[3] In Spain, Argentina and many parts of Mexico they are referred to as "criadillas," and they are colloquially referred to as huevos de toro (literally, "bull’s eggs"; huevos is a Spanish slang term for testicles) in Central and South America.[4] Rocky Mountain oysters are sometimes confused with lamb fries or animelles (lamb testicles), which are served in a manner similar to Rocky Mountain oysters. A few other deceptive terms, such as "cowboy caviar", "Montana tendergroins", "dusted nuts", "bull fries" or "swinging beef" may be used.[5]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountain_oysters


And the Mexican sauteed "Criadillas" and apated dish from the original Spanish dish of the same name (which I imagine will be without Mexican ingredients, and instead prepared with garlic and olive oil or some such ...)
http://www.lacocinadeleslie.com/2011/11/criadillas-la-mexicana-mexican-style.html
http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6107/6346088143_c0da5157d5.jpg
« Last Edit: January 14, 2014, 07:26:13 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
4_0_4
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« Reply #117 on: January 14, 2014, 12:53:39 pm »

(I remember cleaning them when I was small, and pulling pea-crabs from the shells) and testacules octopus tentacles.


Speaking of testicles....  The Spanish brought a custom to the Americas, and it seems that independently some in America go the idea of adapting it to fried food:

US/Canada: "Rocky Mountain Oysters" (US) or Prarie Oysters (Canada)  Grin
I'll let Wiki do the talking....
Quote
Rocky Mountain oysters are bull calf testicles used for human consumption. Sometimes pig or sheep testicles are used.

They are often deep-fried after being peeled, coated in flour, pepper and salt, and sometimes pounded flat. This delicacy is most often served as an appetizer[1] with a cocktail sauce dip.


It is a well-known novelty dish in parts of the American West and Western Canada where cattle ranching is prevalent and castration of young animals is common ("prairie oysters" is the preferred name in Canada, where they may be served in a demi-glace, not deep-fried).[2] In Oklahoma and North Texas, they are sometimes called calf fries but only if taken from very young animals.[3] In Spain, Argentina and many parts of Mexico they are referred to as "criadillas," and they are colloquially referred to as huevos de toro (literally, "bull’s eggs"; huevos is a Spanish slang term for testicles) in Central and South America.[4] Rocky Mountain oysters are sometimes confused with lamb fries or animelles (lamb testicles), which are served in a manner similar to Rocky Mountain oysters. A few other deceptive terms, such as "cowboy caviar", "Montana tendergroins", "dusted nuts", "bull fries" or "swinging beef" may be used.[5]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountain_oysters


And the Mexican sauteed "Criadillas"
http://www.lacocinadeleslie.com/2011/11/criadillas-la-mexicana-mexican-style.html
http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6107/6346088143_c0da5157d5.jpg



Are they chewy ?

I think I'd pass on nuts too , Im  too squeamish to eat things like that..

 
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« Reply #118 on: January 14, 2014, 07:23:09 pm »

I don't know.  I've never had either variety.  There are a couple of things on both sides of the border which I will not touch, but people who had swear by them.   The US and Mexican variants seem to have developed independently from one another, so probably it's that in more rural societies (in this case cattle country in the US and Mexico), people are used to not throwing anything away and are less squeamish about eating certain foods...
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« Reply #119 on: January 15, 2014, 03:20:16 am »

Low-income rural folks tend to use every part of a food animal, wherever they come from in the world. The Southern VA/North Carolina expression I have heard about what parts of a hog get eaten is "Everything from the rooter and the tooter" Smiley

I had a similar reaction to Spanish-style (never had Mexican style Sad ) criadillas to my first reaction to beef tripe braised in hoisin sauce at a dim sum place (I thought it was black mushrooms) - a momentary shudder, then, "D*mn, that was delicious anyway..."
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« Reply #120 on: January 15, 2014, 08:51:24 am »

That and Mexican Tuetano (bone marrow).  People swear by it!  All I know is that it's very greasy.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/tostadas-de-tuetano-marrow-tostadas-recipe/index.html
« Last Edit: January 15, 2014, 09:01:06 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Keith_Beef
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« Reply #121 on: January 15, 2014, 08:55:35 am »

Low-income rural folks tend to use every part of a food animal, wherever they come from in the world. The Southern VA/North Carolina expression I have heard about what parts of a hog get eaten is "Everything from the rooter and the tooter" Smiley

I had a similar reaction to Spanish-style (never had Mexican style Sad ) criadillas to my first reaction to beef tripe braised in hoisin sauce at a dim sum place (I thought it was black mushrooms) - a momentary shudder, then, "D*mn, that was delicious anyway..."


In French the expression is "tout est bon dans le cochon", meaning "every bit of a pig is good". In English, you'd eat "everything but the squeal"; there's a very good book by that title written by an English newspaper journalist who goes around Galicia (western Spain, just north of Portugal), on a mission to do just that.

Incidentally, I happened to pick up a couple of pig's trotters at the supermarket yesterday. Got any good recipes for those?
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« Reply #122 on: January 15, 2014, 09:31:25 am »

Since this is the fried foods thread, a very simple "brunch" recipe from UK with an Asian flair:
Deep fried pigs trotters
http://www.channel4.com/4food/recipes/tv-show-recipes/sunday-brunch-recipes/crispy-pig-s-trotters-recipe


There is this Japanese (?) restaurant that specialises in pig's feet in New York City: Hakata Ton-Ton
http://newyork.seriouseats.com/2010/12/hakata-ton-ton.html


Southern US - "Mom's New Year's Oig Feet"
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/moms-new-years-pigs-feet/
or
http://www.food.com/recipe/southern-style-pigs-feet-146423


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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #123 on: January 19, 2014, 11:32:13 am »

Fried Eel

(Not sure it this counts?)
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« Reply #124 on: January 19, 2014, 08:40:31 pm »

Fried Eel

(Not sure it this counts?)


Yes, of course it does.  I haven't had eel, but it does....  That is Cajun Eel

Sauteeing is not too far from other types of fried Cajun fish.  Which reminds me that all "Blackened" seafood dishes enter the Fried Food category.

Blackening is a Cajun style of cooking where the seafood, typically fish is dipped in butter and "breaded" with a heavy dose of herbs an spices, eg Cayenne pepper (powdered chilies), thyme, oregano, peppercorns, salt, garlic powder and onion powder, and then then pan fried in a very hot cast iron skillet until dark brown and/or black.

Despite looking like a ruined sautée, thanks to the hot spices it acquires a distinctive taste... You are burning the spices, not the fish.




« Last Edit: January 20, 2014, 05:03:56 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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