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Poll
Question: Do you have a "dream home," steamy or otherwise?
A classic Victorian house.
"Retro-modern" house.
Old Gothic church.
Remote cabin.
Old farmhouse.
A liveaboard boat.
An underground or cave house.
A castle/palace.
A small studio apartment.
An RV so I can travel to more SP cons.
An airship.
Gypsy wagon.
A tent.
A craftsman style house.
A tower (silo, windmill, lighthouse, ATC, etc...)
I have no dreams.
Microhome.  3/26/16

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Author Topic: POLL: Your (SP) Dream Home?  (Read 109910 times)
creagmor
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« Reply #225 on: May 05, 2014, 12:17:14 pm »

Can't say how true this is but I read somewhere that geodesic domes didn't really go over due to their high costs.
Respectfully submitted,
Ian S.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #226 on: May 05, 2014, 12:28:22 pm »

Futuro homes   [ the ones that look like UFOs]

 man their must have been some good  *** going around in the 70s

http://hapsical.blogspot.co.nz/2010/05/futuro.html








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Sir Henry
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« Reply #227 on: May 05, 2014, 12:37:21 pm »

I spent a couple of days in a geodesic dome home once and it had one overwhelming drawback - the acoustics. No matter where you were in it (and it was at least the size of a standard house) you could hear everything that anyone else said or did. The sound was just bounced around the whole place. Sad, as the idea was wonderful.
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« Reply #228 on: May 05, 2014, 09:39:07 pm »

Can't say how true this is but I read somewhere that geodesic domes didn't really go over due to their high costs.
Respectfully submitted,
Ian S.


Indeed, but my guess is that the biggest problem is the triangular shapes of the panels.  Wood materials like solid wood or panel of plywood (which is the majority of the material in these buildings) usually comes in rectangular pieces.  So the amount of wasted material must be large.  The other is the need for specialised metal "hubs" to tie in the vertices of the polyhedron, even if the panels were assembled.

I spent a couple of days in a geodesic dome home once and it had one overwhelming drawback - the acoustics. No matter where you were in it (and it was at least the size of a standard house) you could hear everything that anyone else said or did. The sound was just bounced around the whole place. Sad, as the idea was wonderful.


The idea was indeed good, and I still can't find those more interesting examples of domes on the West Coast, but the last video does give you an idea how big these could be.  Partitioning also becomes a problem... seems to suffer from the same spatial inefficacy that makes the new VW Beetle (Sedan) have a poor interior distribution.  Just because you have a lot of volume inside a sphere it doesn't mean that you will be able to fill it up efficiently. Most furniture and appliances are rectangular as so it gives me the impression that a lot of volume is wasted unless you get creative with doors and cabinetry - which results in a lot of customised furniture. On the other hand if you are looking for a spacious interior, empty volume is not a bad thing.  They do make them look nice in the pictures...

For acoustics, yes that is inevitable isn't it?  The only way is to have a lot of partitioning walls and enclosed rooms, but I imagine that destroys the spacious volume in the hemisphere.  Unless you kept the triangle theme and introduce special sound absorbing acoustic surfaces like those used to kill sound in studios.

Futuro homes   [ the ones that look like UFOs]

 man their must have been some good  *** going around in the 70s

http://hapsical.blogspot.co.nz/2010/05/futuro.html











Ye gods Ms. Annie!  Shocked
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Gerry Hunter
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« Reply #229 on: May 06, 2014, 06:39:01 am »

This one is a bit of a gut punch for me but I found this while doing a bit of research for making doll house circus wagons. I kind of like the idea of a small little village community who know and care for each other - and the village travels around the world on adventures together.

I know I will likely never have that, but seeing some of these images - gets sand in my eyes. Because what's in these images is exactly those moments I wish I could be having. The things that turn it from a nifty building into a dream home.

http://tinyhouseswoon.com/the-red-caravan/

it doesn't help that my second place options are Bag End Underhill in the shire. Or my third being Howls Moving Castle.

Things that speak of well worn but comfortable places where the occupant can just be. There also that feeling that there's something just outside the door that might sweep you off on an adventure, but you can always come back through that door to the well worn space of comfort.
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creagmor
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« Reply #230 on: May 06, 2014, 07:06:41 am »

Gerry, I too like the idea of the wagons, as long as I can pull it behind a car/truck rather than a horse. As to the last paragraph; That plants a wonderful mental image in my mind. If I could I would bless you with that dream, and everyone else who desires it.

BTW if your writing, particularly those last few sentences, is normally like that can I assume that you are a writer? If not perhaps you should consider it, if only as a hobby.

Respectfully submitted,

Ian S.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2014, 07:21:15 am by creagmor » Logged
Captain Lyerly
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« Reply #231 on: May 07, 2014, 04:27:46 am »

Indeed.  I made a mistake when I was young and had no idea which way life would lead me; I let the old family place - my great-aunt owned it when she passed away - slip out of the family's possession.  Thirty-five years later I still long for the day that there is a for sale sign out front; I will be mortgaging my soul that afternoon to purchase it.

Brick Georgian, with brick walks; a coach house out back, a formal garden with a wall and a gate that leads down to mysterious woods; a formal dining room, a fireplace in the living room of Carrara marble; memories in the kitchen, a beautiful view out over my home town... mature box hedges - if I smell warm box on a summer day it can choke me up with nostalgia.  There is a "secret" panel in the hallway - it just hides a broom closet, though.  A butler's pantry.  12 foot ceilings in the kitchen - it was built long before air conditioning, and this is the South. 

Ah, well.  They probably re-did the whole place with shag carpeting and flocked wallpaper.



Chas.
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Sir Henry
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« Reply #232 on: May 07, 2014, 10:12:51 am »

Indeed.  I made a mistake when I was young and had no idea which way life would lead me; I let the old family place - my great-aunt owned it when she passed away - slip out of the family's possession.  Thirty-five years later I still long for the day that there is a for sale sign out front; I will be mortgaging my soul that afternoon to purchase it.

Brick Georgian, with brick walks; a coach house out back, a formal garden with a wall and a gate that leads down to mysterious woods; a formal dining room, a fireplace in the living room of Carrara marble; memories in the kitchen, a beautiful view out over my home town... mature box hedges - if I smell warm box on a summer day it can choke me up with nostalgia.  There is a "secret" panel in the hallway - it just hides a broom closet, though.  A butler's pantry.  12 foot ceilings in the kitchen - it was built long before air conditioning, and this is the South. 

Ah, well.  They probably re-did the whole place with shag carpeting and flocked wallpaper.
Don't despair, it can happen. At the end of last year I bought a house that I have coveted for the last 30 years, since I first lived in it. A huge early-mid Victorian terrace with a walled garden at the back. My brother bought it in the early 80's and whenever I have moved I tended to stay here until I had sorted out somewhere new to live, so have now lived here about 6 times. But it was always let out to about half a dozen people, so while it was interesting it was always changing and never really a home. Despite that, it has always been my refuge from the traumas of life. My brother sold it about ten years ago, so when I heard that it was for sale again (at a knock-down price due to the owner's bankruptcy) I pushed myself to the financial limit to buy it. And I'm so glad I did.

It's a magical place - when I first lived here I built a raised/platform/cabin bed 6 foot up (the ceilings are 12 foot, so plenty of headroom). When measuring up I could feel wooden boards behind the wallpaper, so I stripped the paper to find a pine boarded wall containing a huge cupboard and a door 3 feet off the ground. On opening the door I found a staircase that used to lead to the bathroom but had been boarded over above. So to get to the bed you went up a hidden staircase in the wall.
It also still has the first two stained glass windows I designed and made, but sadly much of the rest of it has been altered to suit health and safety regulations for rented properties. I'm slowly going through changing things back to the way they were originally(ish)... It's actually very steampunk in that it's aiming at the original Victorian but with odd additions and variations such as a mahogany cabin bed/fort/hobbithouse for my daughter (I found a load of cheap mahogany floorboards) and, one day, a paternoster larder.

With patience your dreams can come true.
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Arabella Periscope
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Edwardian summer


« Reply #233 on: May 08, 2014, 01:25:02 am »

Sir Henry, You are a very fortunate man.  Many of us have bonded with and lost one particular house from childhood or a happy time in our family life, and long to buy it again one day.  Admiral Wilhelm's house in Mexico had a great tree growing up through the middle of it, around which his house was shaped.  Now we can Google Earth and fly back to those places and look at them, at what people have done to them and how they have rocketed up in value beyond all hope of repurchase, and it is heartbreaking; because, as you said, the lost home was the refuge place, the place where you wanted to be when night fell. 

Maybe the mobile solution is best; carry it with you, and the people.  Home and adventure.  Why not?
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #234 on: May 08, 2014, 02:00:56 am »

Sir Henry, You are a very fortunate man.  Many of us have bonded with and lost one particular house from childhood or a happy time in our family life, and long to buy it again one day.  Admiral Wilhelm's house in Mexico had a great tree growing up through the middle of it, around which his house was shaped.  Now we can Google Earth and fly back to those places and look at them, at what people have done to them and how they have rocketed up in value beyond all hope of repurchase, and it is heartbreaking; because, as you said, the lost home was the refuge place, the place where you wanted to be when night fell.  

Maybe the mobile solution is best; carry it with you, and the people.  Home and adventure.  Why not?

Indeed, Sir Henry!  What a joy to recover that once lost!  

Every day that passes just makes my nostalgia boil over with even more fervor.  The median price for those houses in the posh suburbs of Mexico City is 2.5 million USD.  Assuming that the two adjacent properties my grandfather built are valued as "average" (which they are not), that would place a minimum value of $5 million and further assuming the buyer would sell.  Given how many adoptive  children the lady who bought the house had, I'd say that by now the whole family and new children are living there!  She was like "Mother Goose."  Mind you that was 1987, and 27 years have passed!!
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Maets
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« Reply #235 on: May 08, 2014, 12:15:22 pm »

Available on ebay



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/06/futuro-home_n_5273861.html

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Rare-FUTURO-Home-1-Of-20-In-US-Like-SpaceShip-Mobile-Home-UFO-/221432005189?#description&afsrc=1
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #236 on: May 08, 2014, 04:52:40 pm »



But look at it!  I needs stilts just to stay upright!   What if the thing starts sliding, or ever rolling like a wheel down the hill?  Grin

I say we give it to Herr Doktor, so he can make one of his Martian Attack thingies!  He's going to need a bigger shop!
« Last Edit: May 08, 2014, 04:58:29 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #237 on: May 25, 2014, 12:44:25 am »

There are a surprising number of riverboats for sale:  http://www.thesteampunkempire.com/forum/topics/riverboat-for-sale?xg_source=activity 

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-Karl
Gerry Hunter
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« Reply #238 on: May 26, 2014, 05:28:35 am »

I just found a book that I am really pleased about at a thrift shop. Well okay, just, as in a week ago.



The paint jobs on some of them a very gaudy, but the buildings are quite wonderful.
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creagmor
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South Africa South Africa



« Reply #239 on: May 26, 2014, 04:57:03 pm »

If that's the one I'm thinking of, I really enjoyed it back when it first came out. Also, if I'm correct, this is the only one in this series that shows interiors; and beautiful interiors they are, IMHO. 
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #240 on: May 26, 2014, 07:36:13 pm »

 even  if you paid a dollar - that book looks priceless

 Long live gaudy painted ladies !!
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Gerry Hunter
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« Reply #241 on: May 27, 2014, 07:07:06 am »

If that's the one I'm thinking of, I really enjoyed it back when it first came out. Also, if I'm correct, this is the only one in this series that shows interiors; and beautiful interiors they are, IMHO. 
Unfortunately this volume does not have interiors.
But the exteriors have me brainstorming ideas for designs of dream homes that are mixed in with the tiny house theme inspired from other source. I have been trying to brainstorm means of having a wrap around porch with a second story balcony on a tiny house trailer which tend to no more than 2.5 meters wide, 3.5 tall and not much beyond 7 meters long.

I've some ideas that may work.

It's a fun fantasy, and I'll likely never make it because I'm a bit more attached to the circus wagon idea, but I can still make doll houses without the trailer limitations.
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creagmor
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« Reply #242 on: May 27, 2014, 08:04:00 am »

My error. It may have been "Painted Ladies Revisited" that contained the interiors. Just in case you are interested there are at least three other books in this series, including the original "Painted Ladies" that are available from Amazon.com. If you purchase any of them I think you will find them as enjoyable and insightful as the one you now have.

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« Reply #243 on: June 01, 2014, 11:16:57 pm »

Victorian farmhouse, craftsman, or... what the heck, palace! For me... Smiley

I love Italianate architecture (which most would just call 'Victorian' of a certain style). If it were on the list in specific, I would certainly have chosen it... Many different homes could be quite dreamy. It is difficult to select.

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rovingjack
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« Reply #244 on: June 02, 2014, 09:55:44 am »

I've been doodling some designs up, and as much as I want to say it's very steampunk, it's looking like this one really would rather be art deco in style. I've got floors, "walls and ceiling" patterns mostly worked out (in quotes because it's a bow top divided into three sections, it's not got any right angles or anything to mark seperation of wall from ceiling). I've also been playing with ideas for the outside design. But I've got ideas for the bed and table and kitchen and possibly a bathroom. All in the style of deco.

which is odd because when I started I had one great idea of a bow top ceiling that would be great and very steampunk, but the rest of it just wasn't coming to me. Then all the deco came 'roaring' into my noggin.

But fear not it will have some potential mad scientist like aspects if all goes well. So dieselpunk at least.

If it comes to it at some point that I get the chance to build it and end up able to afford some land I will probably build a bit more steampunk as a bit of a guest wagon/cabin. Doesn't hurt to dream and doodle at any rate Grin
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #245 on: June 03, 2014, 01:39:10 am »

I've been doodling some designs up, and as much as I want to say it's very steampunk, it's looking like this one really would rather be art deco in style. I've got floors, "walls and ceiling" patterns mostly worked out (in quotes because it's a bow top divided into three sections, it's not got any right angles or anything to mark seperation of wall from ceiling). I've also been playing with ideas for the outside design. But I've got ideas for the bed and table and kitchen and possibly a bathroom. All in the style of deco.

which is odd because when I started I had one great idea of a bow top ceiling that would be great and very steampunk, but the rest of it just wasn't coming to me. Then all the deco came 'roaring' into my noggin.

But fear not it will have some potential mad scientist like aspects if all goes well. So dieselpunk at least.

If it comes to it at some point that I get the chance to build it and end up able to afford some land I will probably build a bit more steampunk as a bit of a guest wagon/cabin. Doesn't hurt to dream and doodle at any rate Grin

 Art Deco and Art Nouveau  lend themselves well to industrial type features and styling
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #246 on: June 07, 2014, 08:35:10 am »

I've been doodling some designs up, and as much as I want to say it's very steampunk, it's looking like this one really would rather be art deco in style. I've got floors, "walls and ceiling" patterns mostly worked out (in quotes because it's a bow top divided into three sections, it's not got any right angles or anything to mark seperation of wall from ceiling). I've also been playing with ideas for the outside design. But I've got ideas for the bed and table and kitchen and possibly a bathroom. All in the style of deco.

which is odd because when I started I had one great idea of a bow top ceiling that would be great and very steampunk, but the rest of it just wasn't coming to me. Then all the deco came 'roaring' into my noggin.

But fear not it will have some potential mad scientist like aspects if all goes well. So dieselpunk at least.

If it comes to it at some point that I get the chance to build it and end up able to afford some land I will probably build a bit more steampunk as a bit of a guest wagon/cabin. Doesn't hurt to dream and doodle at any rate Grin


 Art Deco and Art Nouveau  lend themselves well to industrial type features and styling


The only thing is that Art Deco and Art Nouveau are very different things.  Art Deco is more modern and geometric, full of materials and shapes that evoke industrialisation. like metals, granite, concrete, etc.  Whereas Art Nouveau is a derivative of the German Jugendstil, which is entirely based on organic shapes and takes a very stylised version of mother nature as its muse.



BTW: Some royalty-free Art Nouveau vector drawings: http://www.123rf.com/photo_7035931_art-nouveau-collect.html

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



Perhaps you should consider the Prarie Style of Frank Lloyd Wright. It may not be recognised or understood in Europe and elsewhere as this is a Yankee thing, but the style is much more structured for beinng a contemporary style to both Art Nouveau and Art Deco (Lloyd Wright lived a very long life), and admittedly the style is ultra modern, many decades ahead of its time (you need to consider 20-30 years after the actual construction date to make a comparison- in some cases many more).  However, Lloyd Wright was still a Victorian/Edwardian era man, and he liked elaborate interiors, and so his interior designs lend themselves much more to machinery and industrial settings while keeping true to natural materials like stone and wood (the cornerstone of hos "Prarie" style.  Perhaps better suited for an underground -yet very chick- mad science laboratory.  The caveat is that the exterior style is evocative of the American Mid-Western plains (materials and lines) and Lloyd Wright took strong inspiration for his interior decoration from Native American motifs (and even going as far down South as using Mayan styles) in his decor.

Can you see the "horizontal prarie" geometry?  Can you see the Native American Designs in the stained glass?


The Willits House, 1901 (YES, 1901!!)


Quote
Prairie School was a late 19th- and early 20th-century architectural style, most common to the Midwestern United States. The style is usually marked by horizontal lines, flat or hipped roofs with broad overhanging eaves, windows grouped in horizontal bands, integration with the landscape, solid construction, craftsmanship, and discipline in the use of ornament. Horizontal lines were thought to evoke and relate to the native prairie landscape. The term Prairie School was not actually used by these architects to describe themselves (for instance, Marion Mahony used the phrase The Chicago Group); the term was coined by H. Allen Brooks, one of the first architectural historians to write extensively about these architects and their work.





« Last Edit: June 07, 2014, 10:00:13 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Sir Henry
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« Reply #247 on: June 07, 2014, 11:53:06 am »

On this side of the Atlantic we had our equivalent of Frank Lloyd Wright, Charles Rennie Mackintosh. His was more of a transition style between Art Nouveau and Art Deco than Wright who was much closer to Deco in his avoidance of curves and natural forms (except in a stylised and formalised fashion).

Glasgow School




A bit more about him here: http://www.scotcities.com/mackintosh/
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« Reply #248 on: June 07, 2014, 01:51:09 pm »

So tragic, the fire at the Mackintosh library.   Cry  They did manage to save quite a bit but what was lost was irreplaceable.

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Maets
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« Reply #249 on: June 07, 2014, 07:08:15 pm »

How about an airplane for a home?



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/07/oregon-man-lives-in-boeing-727_n_5464613.html
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