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Author Topic: The Brewers' Guild  (Read 52584 times)
morozow
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« Reply #300 on: October 06, 2017, 01:07:58 pm »

Want to make a couple of comments. In order to avoid mistakes, injuries and nervous shock Smiley

1) in any case, this photo is not of my creation. I want to put but a little later. They look not so nice.

2) I'm not a real cook. And for me, the preparation of such salted, that field for self-expression, creativity and relentless experimentation with cooking. Smiley

So. General principles of salting:

To use some stainless dishes. I take a wide but low enamelled crockery that would brisket  lay there in 1 or 2 layers maximum. Taking into account that the thickness of a piece 5-10 cm is Possible tolshe, but then salting longer. Other parameters of the piece - how easy to cook, that would be in the dishes climbed. I got a 10x20 cm, But if tolshe

On 1 kg of the original product need 4 tablespoons of salt. Preferably coarsely ground.

Spices to taste, and ingenuity (the Foundation of spice - black pepper). Garlic, too.

To suppress a piece of garlic. Part of the garlic I chop into pieces. Now it looks better.

Salt, spices and garlic to mix. grate this mixture pieces of brisket.

You can lard brisket  garlic.

On the bottom of the dish sprinkle a little salt. And tightly stack the pieces. Between them you can put Bay leaves or black pepper.

If several layers are put - piling of fat produced by the rule: fat to fat, skin to skin.

The rest of the salt, to sprinkle on top.

Top cover lid.

At night, leave at room temperature. And then in the refrigerator (not the freezer), 5-7 days (with stock).

Salt extracts the portion contained in the meat water and forms a brine. This is normal. After cooking pour out.

The finished product is stored in the refrigerator.

Before drinking extra salt to clean off with a knife. And cut into small pieces.

And God help us.

Actually, it's all done quite simply and quickly. I have to prepare 1-2 of brisket to go somewhere for half an hour, 40 minutes. The longest - cleaning garlic.

Below are a few illustrations of how it looks

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

P.S. You can do the same as the picture in the previous post. But they need not take the breast, that's pure fat, with a minimum of meat. Then there will be brine. And I will be such beautiful white bars covered with spices
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Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?
Synistor 303
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Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #301 on: October 08, 2017, 06:56:27 am »

Thank you so much for that! The pictures are particularly helpful - especially in the translation of 'brisket', which is not a term used in Australia. That looks like pork belly in your pictures. I have a good spice blend of paprika, salt, black pepper and garlic that I use for prosciutto which should work very well for this recipe. I'll give it a shot. (which will probably translate into Russian as "I will shoot a gun at it." ha ha ha...) I will also look on Len Poli's web site to see if he has a similar recipe there. Well worth a look if you like to make your own sausages or salami or any other similar product.

Thanks!
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Synistor 303
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« Reply #302 on: October 08, 2017, 07:11:30 am »

A bit more research has shown it is pork BACK fat, not belly. Lardo (Italian) or Salo (Ukrainian).
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morozow
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« Reply #303 on: October 08, 2017, 01:25:33 pm »

Again a question of terminology and translation Smiley.

It was better to give a link to this article - Salo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salo_(food)

Salo is a common Eastern European word.

Probably the problem is that there is no classification of the different types and varieties. No matter how prepared (and there are several methods of salting), no matter what part of the pig did not take ( the main thing that was a layer of fat) - still Salo.


And Yes, I also want to advise. Keep ready Salo in the freezer. And try to eat here for such a cold piece of  Salo.

Well, there is a lot of salt and fat. You know how bad that is Wink
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #304 on: October 10, 2017, 12:53:26 am »

Bad news for wine lovers in America. California's Napa Valley and other areas which are the centre for wine producers are being destroyed by wildfires. California's dry weather combined with a warm autumn and hight winds is spelling disaster for the region.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-41559875
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Synistor 303
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« Reply #305 on: October 10, 2017, 07:14:58 am »

They have our sympathy - we have had the same problem here in Australia. To add to the disaster of burned vines, after the fires, any vines/grapes that survived were then tainted with smoke. It really destroyed two vintages. The ash in the soil had to leach out for a year before the next vintage was any good for wine.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #306 on: October 11, 2017, 05:55:27 pm »

They have our sympathy - we have had the same problem here in Australia. To add to the disaster of burned vines, after the fires, any vines/grapes that survived were then tainted with smoke. It really destroyed two vintages. The ash in the soil had to leach out for a year before the next vintage was any good for wine.

I don't drink American wine that often, as I have a predilection for Spanish wine and bubbly and if I'm in a sweet tooth mood, German wine, but American wine can be very good. They go by grape type rather than region (obviously since all vines were imported) , thus they can produce very interesting varieties and blends as well. It's a shame to see all that hard work go in flames. The Napa and Sonoma areas are beautiful - all of Northern California is.
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von Corax
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« Reply #307 on: September 15, 2019, 05:44:23 am »

After mumblemumble years, I have finally acquired one Round Tuit, and have begun brewing.

To date, I have started three batches using the FestaBrew English Pale Ale dump-and-stir kits (wort ready-to-brew, no boiling or diluting required.) Batch 1 was started in a 6 gal. glass carboy and, despite energetically disassembling the airlock, was quite drinkable after one week in primary, two in secondary, and two in the bottles. Batch 2 started in my 26ℓ bottling bucket, which overflowed in the kreusen stage, and spent three weeks in primary; despite this, it has a better head and is at least as drinkable as Batch 1. (The second bottle is at my elbow as I type this.) Batch 3 started in a 30ℓ bucket fermenter, spent one week in primary, and will be bottled next weekend after two weeks in secondary.

Has anyone else done anything in the two years since this thread was last active?
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By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
By the Beans of Life do my thoughts acquire speed
My hands acquire a shaking
The shaking becomes a warning
By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
The Leverkusen Institute of Paleocybernetics is 5838 km from Reading
Banfili
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« Reply #308 on: September 15, 2019, 06:40:19 am »

Nope!
at least, not in the brewing field - plenty of other stuff accomplished! I rarely drink, and have never brewed, although my younger brother has experimented with both beer and winemaking.
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Madasasteamfish
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09madasafish
« Reply #309 on: September 15, 2019, 11:55:26 am »

I've been doing a fairly regular brew up, but just haven't had the inclination to post about it (thread necromancy gets a little tiring after a while).

As of this minute, I've got a batch of strawberry wine, a gallon of parsnip wine and a mixed fruit wine in secondary (I obtained several tins of fruit cocktail and used them as the basis), but haven't been able to bottle them (although the parsnip will want racking again before that happens) yet for reasons.

I've also got sone blackberry gin sat infusing (using foraged blackberries) and I have plans to make a batch of cider as I picked some crab apples whilst out foraging.

I'm also considering some heather vodka/gin, but want to see what sort of aroma dried heather produces over time...
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I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."
Synistor 303
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Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #310 on: September 18, 2019, 02:14:05 am »

I have a batch of vine flower wine which tastes more like a fortified wine than a white wine. I suppose I must do something with it - bottle it or something. It is very nice if not a little strong.

I also have a Trent. (Son-in-law) who is a brewer and comes up with some marvellous things for his mother-in-law to try. I particularly liked the brewed Lemon Lime and Bitters he did, whilst my spouse loves the dark ales. I would recommend everyone gets themselves a Trent. His knowledge of wines is also excellent, and his insider knowledge ensures our cellar (OK, it is a cupboard under the stairs...) is well stocked.
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