Author Topic: Steamy Steampunk Buildings  (Read 154347 times)

GCCC

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #150 on: August 18, 2015, 04:38:45 pm »
Did this building ever go by a different name, before it was Avery Apartments?

This looks about right: http://bypearl.com/the-aviary/


Well, that's the problem with assumptions; of the two spellings supplied, I picked the wrong one as the one I thought was misspelled...

Thanks!

The problem is, I still can't find out anything about the building's history. It looks like the best I can do is write to the neighborhood association and ask them for help.

In looking for the above building, came across this one...

Full story here: http://historicindianapolis.com/whats-in-a-name-vajen-exchange-block/

That's gorgeous. Too bad they only salvaged the facade, but man, that's a good-looking facade...

GCCC

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #151 on: August 18, 2015, 04:57:46 pm »
Did this building ever go by a different name, before it was Avery Apartments?
This looks about right: http://bypearl.com/the-aviary/


Okay, I just tried a different tactic. Instead of searching for the "Aviary Building"/"Apartments" or "Historical Buildings Indianapolis" I typed in the address. Depending on the realtor's website you check, it was built in either 1910 or 1911.

For anything more than that, I'd probably still have to contact the neighborhood association.

RJBowman

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #152 on: August 26, 2015, 02:12:34 am »
Several days ago I visited a place so vast and labyrinthine that it was to have steampunk places within in just out of shear chance. I had been told that it was an amazing children's museum, but it was far beyond my expectations. Here is the heart of the City Museum in St. Luois:



The museum has a few regular exhibits of historic and artistic interest, the the bulk of the ten-story former warehouse is dedicated to mazes, walkways, tunnels, and slides, and giant works of art that you can climb on and explore. Imagine that you had millions of dollars and all the best architectural detail and industrial structures from every historic building recently demolished in a large metropolitan area, and you hired bohemian artists and structural engineers to build a giant playland.

The above image is of the secret 10-story atrium, filled with spiral staircases and spiral slides. The basement and first floor contain an artificial cave with cave formations shaped like dinosaurs and fantasy creatures. Somewhere around the second and third floors there is a full-size cathedral pipe organ in a locked cage with the pipes suspended above. There is a ten-story slide somewhere in that atrium but I didn't get to it.



The rest of the building is more modern; the mazes extend to the outside and onto the roof ten stories above:





yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #153 on: August 26, 2015, 12:30:37 pm »
WoW!
Steampunk Widgets and Icons of Some Worldwide Repute

Maets

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #154 on: August 27, 2015, 01:39:43 am »
WOW and double WOW! That looks like a great place to visit.

RJBowman

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #155 on: August 29, 2015, 02:44:56 am »

The Nickels Arcade in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

This is what the exterior looks like:


This glass-roofed pedestrian business strip was built in a century ago by local businessman Tom E. Nickels. The design was inspired by similar buildings that Nickels has seen in Europe. The walkway is lined with shops on both sides, with offices on the second floor. Shoppers can go from business to business without suffering any bad weather.

The sidewalks on the open ends of the arcade have glass circles that are lit from underneath at night. There is a freight elevator that emerges from a metal hatch in the sidewalk.

Alfred Taubman, credited with inventing the indoor shopping mall, studied architecture at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and certainly must have been familiar with the Nickels Arcade.

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #156 on: August 29, 2015, 08:19:24 am »
Several days ago I visited a place so vast and labyrinthine that it was to have steampunk places within in just out of shear chance. I had been told that it was an amazing children's museum, but it was far beyond my expectations. Here is the heart of the City Museum in St. Luois:



The museum has a few regular exhibits of historic and artistic interest, the the bulk of the ten-story former warehouse is dedicated to mazes, walkways, tunnels, and slides, and giant works of art that you can climb on and explore. Imagine that you had millions of dollars and all the best architectural detail and industrial structures from every historic building recently demolished in a large metropolitan area, and you hired bohemian artists and structural engineers to build a giant playland.

The above image is of the secret 10-story atrium, filled with spiral staircases and spiral slides. The basement and first floor contain an artificial cave with cave formations shaped like dinosaurs and fantasy creatures. Somewhere around the second and third floors there is a full-size cathedral pipe organ in a locked cage with the pipes suspended above. There is a ten-story slide somewhere in that atrium but I didn't get to it.



The rest of the building is more modern; the mazes extend to the outside and onto the roof ten stories above:






The staircases look like some architecture by Antoni Gaudi

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #157 on: August 29, 2015, 11:23:23 am »
Arcades are fairly common over here in grand and not so grand forms, extension of the idea of the covered market, you'll probably recognise this from Harry Potter:



I prefer an arcade to a mall any day of the week. An arcade is a private and inviting covered street, lit by gas or electric with a character. Curved arcades are not uncommon here as they add excitement as to what is just around the corner.

Here is another in Birmingham, City Arcade.



Birmingham has more than one! The Great Western Arcade.



An arcade is a wonder - Malls are soulless horrible places. If you shop in a mall - curse you!
« Last Edit: August 29, 2015, 11:30:33 am by yereverluvinunclebert »

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #158 on: August 29, 2015, 01:36:05 pm »
Just reviewed this whole thread from the beginning - it contains some really fine and fascinating buildings from around the world. One of the best threads on this forum - It should be compulsory reading.

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #159 on: August 29, 2015, 01:44:09 pm »
Blackfriar's Tavern in London, Blackfriars.



See this image in full height and in all its glory here:

http://www.tubewalker.com/images/district/victoria_to_bow_road/source/victoria_to_bow_road120.jpg

Doesn't get much more steamy than this.



« Last Edit: August 29, 2015, 01:52:51 pm by yereverluvinunclebert »

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #160 on: November 23, 2015, 12:04:36 am »


County-Arcade-Victoria-Quarter-Leeds



St George's Hall.  Located in Liverpool, Merseyside, England, UK.



St Giles' RC Church.  Located in Cheadle, Staffordshire, England, UK.



Miller Arcade.  Located in Preston, Lancashire, England, UK



Castle Howard The-Great-Hall



 Leeds Central Library.  Located in Leeds, Yorkshire, England, UK.

Find the original photos here:
 http://kippa2001.deviantart.com/








Drew P

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #161 on: November 28, 2015, 02:21:11 pm »
Need...to...take...a...trip.
*drool*
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yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #162 on: November 28, 2015, 11:54:11 pm »
Here are more to make you drool...






Oxford museum of natural history - right click and select View image to see these in full.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2015, 11:56:27 pm by yereverluvinunclebert »

Drew P

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #163 on: November 29, 2015, 04:34:39 am »
Fantastic! :o

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #164 on: December 10, 2015, 03:49:33 pm »
The Natural History Museum London - right click and view image.



chironex

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #165 on: December 21, 2015, 11:57:48 am »
I took an official Townsville City Council heritage trail, and made a folder for the images. I have added some that aren't on the trail but if you take it you can't miss them, as well as skipping some because they had customers who may not be happy (though I usually blot faces and number plates out) and others because they are peoples' houses.
Anyway, here is trail 3, South Townsville and Port:
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/gallery/57178197/South-Townsville-heritage-walk
See if there is anything steamy in there.
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Hurricane Annie

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #166 on: December 26, 2015, 08:26:25 pm »
I took an official Townsville City Council heritage trail, and made a folder for the images. I have added some that aren't on the trail but if you take it you can't miss them, as well as skipping some because they had customers who may not be happy (though I usually blot faces and number plates out) and others because they are peoples' houses.
Anyway, here is trail 3, South Townsville and Port:
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/gallery/57178197/South-Townsville-heritage-walk
See if there is anything steamy in there.

  Australia does have distinctive architecture  from that era. The Queenslander type ; a style  based on the buildings of the more tropical  corners of the empire.  Fabulous  design in even the humblest of homes from the 1800s.

Custom House Townsville


Supreme Court house  [ ad original customs house]


http://www.townsville.qld.gov.au/facilities/parks/Documents/WE%20Cemetery%20Trail%203%20LR.pdf
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queenslander_(architecture)
https://federation-house.wikispaces.com/Queenslander+Tropical+styles






 

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #167 on: December 28, 2015, 08:09:09 am »
I must admit I like the Colonial-style corrugated iron buildings. They are really quite rare in the UK as corrugated iron has been disparaged as poor quality building material just because it was once so very common. That is not really fair as the combination of cast iron supports/columns and corrugated iron can make an interesting building. I used to live in South Africa and the humblest buildings were made from the same material. So few of them exist as many have been demolished. Whole areas of Colonial Western-style single-story shops with verandahs have been demolished - Diagonal Road was one with many old shops that no longer exist.

Those buildings look fascinating and really worth exploring.

chironex

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #168 on: December 28, 2015, 10:33:50 am »
I took an official Townsville City Council heritage trail, and made a folder for the images. I have added some that aren't on the trail but if you take it you can't miss them, as well as skipping some because they had customers who may not be happy (though I usually blot faces and number plates out) and others because they are peoples' houses.
Anyway, here is trail 3, South Townsville and Port:
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/gallery/57178197/South-Townsville-heritage-walk
See if there is anything steamy in there.

  Australia does have distinctive architecture  from that era. The Queenslander type ; a style  based on the buildings of the more tropical  corners of the empire.  Fabulous  design in even the humblest of homes from the 1800s.


And more. That folder alone has a serious anachronism stew of styles, ranging from post-WW2 concrete brick to Spanish mission. Being a relatively new country, we have our own style by now, but half the world (as well) brought their styles here too.

Here are two other trails mentioned in Council leaflets:
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/gallery/57243065/Early-Townsville-Walk
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/gallery/57242939/Civic-Pride-Walk
And some more that I find on my travels:
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/gallery/57244562/historical-buildings
That last one WILL be added to.


Hurricane Annie

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #169 on: December 28, 2015, 10:54:08 am »
I took an official Townsville City Council heritage trail, and made a folder for the images. I have added some that aren't on the trail but if you take it you can't miss them, as well as skipping some because they had customers who may not be happy (though I usually blot faces and number plates out) and others because they are peoples' houses.
Anyway, here is trail 3, South Townsville and Port:
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/gallery/57178197/South-Townsville-heritage-walk
See if there is anything steamy in there.

  Australia does have distinctive architecture  from that era. The Queenslander type ; a style  based on the buildings of the more tropical  corners of the empire.  Fabulous  design in even the humblest of homes from the 1800s.


And more. That folder alone has a serious anachronism stew of styles, ranging from post-WW2 concrete brick to Spanish mission. Being a relatively new country, we have our own style by now, but half the world (as well) brought their styles here too.

Here are two other trails mentioned in Council leaflets:
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/gallery/57243065/Early-Townsville-Walk
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/gallery/57242939/Civic-Pride-Walk
And some more that I find on my travels:
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/gallery/57244562/historical-buildings
That last one WILL be added to.




 There was such attention to detail back then.  Real craftsmanship .

 I lived in   Perth Australia for   a year or so  and the one thing I noticed  was although the older  buildings had a similar plan  to New Zealand homes; there was more intricate detail and style   features,  and adaptions for the  Australian heat. It may have been also  stronger continental influence.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2015, 10:56:06 am by Hurricane Annie »

chironex

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #170 on: December 29, 2015, 02:40:04 am »
These have been preserved by the National Trust:


I think they said that was a tug captains' house?

Note the outer wall around what was probably a verandah. This tended to happen to an awful lot of houses in this style after the discovery that terrible plagues are carried by mosquitoes.



"Currajong" (not to be confused with the suburb of Currajong, which is nowhere near the place, the house having been built in Pimlico and moved to the current site in West End without ever being in Currajong unless the trucks stopped there for some reason) was built by a character by the name of Rooney, the site of whose sawmill and factory near Rooney's Bridge in Railway Estate I visited yesterday, though there is no evidence apart from rubble forming the bank, barely-visible cracked concrete and a bit of railway line that has been left there. The house contains a bookshelf the company built for the old courthouse, thought to be the oldest surviving piece made in Townsville.
Also used as a hospital during WW2, and has changed shape somewhat due to pieces being removed. The not-exactly-surgical chainsaw wound not withstanding.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 12:16:34 pm by chironex »

chironex

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #171 on: January 02, 2016, 10:07:03 am »





Great Northern Railway Station, Townsville.



McCartins Auctions, formerly a freight house. Clearly they don't actually use that freight platform, it's just a rotting leftover piece.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 12:35:51 pm by chironex »

Hurricane Annie

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #172 on: January 02, 2016, 09:02:46 pm »


The old colonial railway station . They always look haunted

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #173 on: January 03, 2016, 03:01:08 am »
Luckily we still have a few of those over here:



Sherringham Station.

Hurricane Annie

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #174 on: January 03, 2016, 03:05:54 am »
Luckily we still have a few of those over here:



Sherringham Station.

 That is a charming and quaint station.