Author Topic: Steamy Steampunk Buildings  (Read 154268 times)

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8113
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1325 on: January 19, 2022, 05:20:23 am »
From January 6, 2022

The historical centre hill contains a hill bordered by San Antonio Street and 7th Street. On It are at least 4 Victorian homes, out of which the most prominent is the John Bremond House.  The backside of the house, where you can find the fire escape ladders is facing North, and the front of all the houses have now their view blocked by a monstrosity of a building that's still in construction. It's sad to see all these houses live in a permanent shadow. The new building is very tall.









I'll continue posting pictures. Manually typing the embed commands is a bit cumbersome, so not quite as fast as the BG forum...

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8113
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1326 on: January 19, 2022, 05:24:45 am »
From January 7, 2022

Here's two more Victorian homes on the historical block of Seventh Street and San Antonio Street






These homes don't have names or references,save for the first one. The second one (2nd, 3rd pics) is actually owned by a law firm. A common fate of Victorian homes that survived downtown.

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8113
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1327 on: January 19, 2022, 05:28:16 am »
From January 8, 2022

While the Z' Tejas restaurant chain in Austin closed it's northwest location during the pandemic, they kept their older location on 6th Street. They bought two old houses, one of them Victorian, and built a "bridge" between them to make a restaurant. The front has a mural that looks like "Willie Nelson's Last Supper"

(Note: Mozilla Firefox may crop the images under certain settings)





J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8113
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1328 on: January 19, 2022, 05:30:24 am »
From January 9, 2022

That giant building in front of the Bremond and other Victorian houses above? Well, guess what? That'll be the tallest building in Austin at 66 floors, on the corner of 6th and Guadalupe. Those houses will never see sunlight again. And guess who just announced is going to rent the top ½ of the building. Meta...the parent company of Faceplant. Aaaargh!

chironex

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 939
  • The typing jellyfish monster
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1329 on: February 14, 2022, 08:05:08 am »
An exploration of the Winter Gardens centre in Blackpool:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-KAXqaGa9U
No gel ball ban in WA! http://chng.it/pcKk9qKcVN

QUEENSLAND RAIL NOT FOR SALE!!!!!!

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8113
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1330 on: February 21, 2022, 03:04:38 am »
One of those travel bloggers running around in Mexico has done a deeper piece on the Mexican mining town of Real del Monte, a former Novo-Spanish mining town whose mining interests were sold by Mexico to British interests in 1824 just before Great Britain recognized Mexico's independence (the author of the video makes the mistake of thinking that the Spanish sold the mines to the British. In fact the Spanish owners of the mines fled as a result of the war of independence).

Previously, I had told you about the Cornish miners who were brought to Mexico, and the Pasties they relegated to the local cuisine. This, I think is an interesting take. "La Karencita" is a Mexican vlogger who married a foreigner and used to vlog from Europe and the United States for a fair number of years. Lately she's come back to live in Mexico and started sharing her point of view. If you can just suffer a bit from her thick accent, I think it's an interesting video because she tends to give more details from the perspective of a Mexican national.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=ETWooGDXTnM&feature=youtu.be#
« Last Edit: February 21, 2022, 06:40:12 am by J. Wilhelm »

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8113
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1331 on: March 06, 2022, 10:37:07 pm »
Oh do I have a treat today .The only example in the world of a 100% disassemblable all steel building in the Art Nouveau style.

It's the Palacio de Hierro City Hall ("Iron Palace," not to be confused with the contemporary Palacio de Hierro department store buildings), built in the 19th C., located in the City of Orizaba, State of Veracruz in Mexico.

https://es.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palacio_de_Hierro_de_Orizaba#/media/Archivo%3APleno_del_Honorable_Cabildo_de_Orizaba.jpg


At the height of the Porfiriato Era, the city of Orizaba became an industrial center which attracted many foreign migrants and industrialists from France, Germany, Sweden, Britain, and Italy. The city became renowned for it's culture the city's mayor sought to erect a building worthy of the city's international reputation. With help from the State and Federal governments, they commissioned the project from La Société Anonyme des Forges d'Aiseau in Belgium and construction began in September of 1891.


The Belgian architect Joseph Danly designed the structure to be premanufactured in Belgium, then disassembled and transported to Mexico by ship. At a cost of $71000 pesos, the total number of pallets holding the myriad metal components was 3369, transported in three shipments from the Port of Antwerp to the Port City of Veracruz.


The cost of disembarking, and overland transport over the mountains of the Eastern Sierra Madre drew additional costs of up to $10000 pesos per ton. The cost overrun was so high that they had to limit the design to the most basic original plan, and switch to a Mexican construction firm headed by civil engineers Arturo Boca and Ricardo Segura  to perform the foundation work and assembly of the metal structure.


The building was inaugurated in 16 September of 1894, coinciding with the Mexican Independence Day celebration.


The building today is a museum and hosts several souvenir shops and a cafeteria


« Last Edit: March 06, 2022, 10:48:33 pm by J. Wilhelm »

morozow

  • Zeppelin Captain
  • *****
  • Posts: 706
    • Billboard unformatted events
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1332 on: March 07, 2022, 02:31:41 pm »
Belarus. / Kotlubaev Manor in the village of Yastrembel

In the spring of 1851, the village of Yastrembel and all the lands around were sold to Mikhail Kotlubai, a nobleman with a bit of Tatar blood. The credit for the construction of the building belongs to Edward Kotlubay, a young and talented engineer who received the best technical education at that time. It was Edward's ideas that formed the basis of the project for the construction of the manor house and the subtleties of the layout of the park area around the building. It is considered that this house is an "unfixed castle". The central part of the house is crowned by a tent tower and a house church. The architecture of the estate seems to have declared war on the rules of symmetry – everything is very unusual and mysterious. So it turned out to be an original and memorable family estate. The house had 18 rooms decorated with stucco. The walls were covered with frescoes based on ancient history, the floors were covered with parquet. All these elements individually represented mini-works of art. Alas, none of these decorative elements have been preserved inside.

The estate is popular with travelers and historians who often visit these places. A unique park area has been preserved, with rare species of trees and plants around the estate.

http://youtu.be/YzI379Fgjg4

Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8113
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1333 on: March 13, 2022, 03:20:22 am »
Belarus. / Kotlubaev Manor in the village of Yastrembel

In the spring of 1851, the village of Yastrembel and all the lands around were sold to Mikhail Kotlubai, a nobleman with a bit of Tatar blood. The credit for the construction of the building belongs to Edward Kotlubay, a young and talented engineer who received the best technical education at that time. It was Edward's ideas that formed the basis of the project for the construction of the manor house and the subtleties of the layout of the park area around the building. It is considered that this house is an "unfixed castle". The central part of the house is crowned by a tent tower and a house church. The architecture of the estate seems to have declared war on the rules of symmetry – everything is very unusual and mysterious. So it turned out to be an original and memorable family estate. The house had 18 rooms decorated with stucco. The walls were covered with frescoes based on ancient history, the floors were covered with parquet. All these elements individually represented mini-works of art. Alas, none of these decorative elements have been preserved inside.

The estate is popular with travelers and historians who often visit these places. A unique park area has been preserved, with rare species of trees and plants around the estate.

http://youtu.be/YzI379Fgjg4



The use of asymmetrical structures in houses is something that we've seen from houses built for wealthy central Europeans in Mexico, particularly Bavarian migrants who owned mining operations. There's a few examples of manors far away from the large cities, but very few survived.

chironex

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 939
  • The typing jellyfish monster
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1334 on: March 16, 2022, 02:26:27 pm »
I have just been introduced to this resource:
https://qldarch.net/projects

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8113
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1335 on: March 17, 2022, 01:54:03 am »
I have just been introduced to this resource:
https://qldarch.net/projects

Not being an architect, I'm sure I'm missing a ton of resources on architectural projects... Every country must have at least one catalog of buildings, whether it be published by the government or by an architectural firm.

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8113
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1336 on: March 17, 2022, 02:23:20 am »
Another picture from Downtown Austin. Our public transportation system is rubbish, so we've been getting a lot of ride cancellations. It's getting out of hand as they don't have enough drivers for all the routes, so this year we have random cancellations which you can monitor from your smartphone. As a result I'm finding myself spending a lot more time walking all over downtown.

By the way, SXSW, the live music/ film/ tech festival is back this year, tight now until the weekend. I hardly have any time to go, but it's ridiculously close to the parts I show in these pictures above and below on this page. I mostly walk in the "Business District of downtown", but a few more blocks west from the highrise buildings you have the 6th Street pub and nightclub district.

I should probably write something about this year's SXSW while the festival is ongoing. I'm just too tired after work and too busy to go at it "live," but I'll make an effort to go this weekend and maybe I can write a postmortem report on it.  You can't do anything at SXSW without planning ahead. There's so many events spread over a radius of 10 blocks in any direction that if you don't plan and know where you're going you'll just walk a lot for nothing.

Hirschfeld House and Cottage.
The house was built in 1885 for a German Jewish merchant by the name of Henry Hirschfeld
 and his family after living in a small cottage (1875) next to the larger house.
Near 9th Street and Guadalupe Street, Austin, Texas.



« Last Edit: March 17, 2022, 02:32:29 am by J. Wilhelm »

Sorontar

  • Administrator
  • Zeppelin Admiral
  • *****
  • Posts: 886
  • All ideas should have wings
    • Sorontar
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1337 on: March 19, 2022, 03:43:57 am »
The choice of contrasting colours is very interesting. I don't remember ever seeing anything like that in Australian buildings of similar age. Would that building have been heritage protected and forced to use original colouring or is that a modern decoration style?

I also like the decorations on the stone work at the top (one of the blocks to the left by the top window makes it look like the grill and headlights for a Jeep Wrangler) and the lintels (or whatever they are called) jutting out under the guttering.

Sorontar
« Last Edit: March 19, 2022, 03:48:21 am by Sorontar »
Sorontar, Captain of 'The Aethereal Dancer'
Advisor to HM Engineers on matters aethereal, aeronautic and cosmographic
http://eyrie.sorontar.com

von Corax

  • Squire of the Lambda Calculus
  • Administrator
  • Master Tinkerer
  • *****
  • Posts: 5947
  • Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1338 on: March 19, 2022, 06:53:58 am »
I also like … the lintels (or whatever they are called) jutting out under the guttering.

Sorontar

I think those are called corbels, although I am not an architect. If you refer to my email address, Sorontar, you can guess why I am familiar with the term.
By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
By the Beans of Life do my thoughts acquire speed
My hands acquire a shaking
The shaking becomes a warning
By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
The Leverkusen Institute of Paleocybernetics is 5821 km from Reading

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8113
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1339 on: March 19, 2022, 08:15:12 pm »
The choice of contrasting colours is very interesting. I don't remember ever seeing anything like that in Australian buildings of similar age. Would that building have been heritage protected and forced to use original colouring or is that a modern decoration style?

I also like the decorations on the stone work at the top (one of the blocks to the left by the top window makes it look like the grill and headlights for a Jeep Wrangler) and the lintels (or whatever they are called) jutting out under the guttering.

Sorontar

The  Germanic national origin of the owner counts too. I can't comment on the darker colors used, but the "chunkiness"of the decorations is interesting. I don't think those would be "new additions," though they appeal the modern eye.

Do you remember the 5 Scherer houses in Mexico City, a few pages back?  One or two of those were called "chalets" by the German owner. In this case, below, the Scherer Chalet was built in 1906, which is about 20 years after the Hirschfeld house. In the later case, Scherer was nostalgic about his former country's architecture (Bavaria, I believe), typically involving half timber construction, and that was a common theme among Germanic migrants when they commissioned late 19th century architects - Not forgetting about Art Nouveau and Jugendstil design influences (note asymmetrical placement of tower and filigree below) which led back to many changes to architecture around the turn of the century, to what I'd call "American Arts and Crafts bungalows." All those "bungalows" were timber houses, including decorations. It's common to see some of that in the lesser, turn of century homes in Austin.

However, steel handrails and columns are found in "French" style architecture, some in Austin's fancier Victorian homes which you've seen before (Littlefield House), but more commonly as you move eastward through the Texas coastline into Louisiana, where you'll find all that fancy metal work everywhere, with filigree- usually painted black, I might add.

Fifth Scherer House, 1906, Mixcoac Borough, Mexico City


As far as protecting colors, no. In Texas,at least, there's no such protection,as far as I know. It's mostly s private citizens' designation with backing from the State, so there's no regulation on keeping original materials or paint colors.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2022, 08:28:39 pm by J. Wilhelm »

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8113
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1340 on: April 03, 2022, 08:18:52 pm »
The Spanish Casino, is a four storey building erected by the Spanish migrant community in Mexico City in 1905. The building houses a Spanish cuisine restaurant, the Spanish Mexican Library and numerous halls for banquets and special events.

Designed by Spanish architect Emilio González del Campo, the building incorporated several styles, ranging from Renaissance Revival, Baroque and Arab ("Moorish") Revival. The atrium ceiling has a Tiffany styled leaded glass canopy showing the Spanish coat of arms


The atrium of the Spanish Casino, in downtown Mexico City
https://es.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casino_Espa%C3%B1ol_de_M%C3%A9xico



The exterior of the Spanish Casino


J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8113
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1341 on: April 10, 2022, 08:33:29 pm »
Today someone posted this picture of the Orizaba "Iron Palace" City Hall, a few posts above. It's nice enough to post

Illuminated Orizaba City Hall ("The Iron Palace")

morozow

  • Zeppelin Captain
  • *****
  • Posts: 706
    • Billboard unformatted events
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1342 on: April 24, 2022, 07:44:09 am »
It's more of a dieselpunk, but it's fine.

The dam of the Kirov reservoir on the Talas River in Kyrgyzstan.

It was built in 1975 to provide water to the agricultural areas of the Talas Valley and, first of all, the neighboring one Of the Kazakh Republic.



:







SeVeNeVeS

  • Master Tinkerer
  • ***
  • Posts: 1639
  • Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1343 on: April 24, 2022, 08:40:53 am »
That, I like quite a bit not your normal looking dam.

Mercury Wells

  • Rogue Ætherlord
  • *
  • Posts: 3282
  • I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)
« Last Edit: May 17, 2022, 07:07:47 pm by Mercury Wells »
Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

The Ministry of Tea respectfully advises you to drink one cup of tea day...for that +5 Moral Fibre stat.

chironex

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 939
  • The typing jellyfish monster
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1345 on: May 06, 2022, 11:15:58 am »
Been to Brisbane again:








All Hallows School.






St Pauls Presbyterian Church.


chironex

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 939
  • The typing jellyfish monster
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1346 on: May 06, 2022, 12:59:46 pm »



Roma Street Station.

St Andrews Uniting Church.





All Hallows school.







Old Brisbane Museum.












chironex

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 939
  • The typing jellyfish monster
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1347 on: May 06, 2022, 01:00:52 pm »


Brisbane Central State School.










J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8113
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1348 on: May 07, 2022, 07:49:10 am »
Ha! All those bricks reminded me of Gregory Gymnasium at the University of Texas at Austin. Built in 1930 in honor of Thomas Watt Gregory, an alumnus and a regent of the university, who also served as United States Attorney General.



You also Remini me si haven't photographed the old Masonic Lodge downtown.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2022, 07:51:52 am by J. Wilhelm »

chironex

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 939
  • The typing jellyfish monster
Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1349 on: May 16, 2022, 09:35:47 am »
If you could live in Adelaide, this is up for grabs:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tlDu4q8oac