Author Topic: Steamy Steampunk Buildings  (Read 154336 times)

Synistor 303

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« Last Edit: October 26, 2021, 12:54:16 am by Mercury Wells »
Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1302 on: November 08, 2021, 10:06:25 pm »
Photos of Kirkgate Market - Leeds (UK)

History of Leeds Kirkgate Market

Leeds Kirkgate market must win a prize for Steaminess, if only because it was designed by Paxton.

However, I'd like to propose Slough Railway Station for a proxime accessit.  From the early days of Railway building in Britain, for a while it served as the station for Windsor Castle (until the branch line was built into Windsor).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slough_railway_station#/media/File:Slough_station_building.JPG

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1303 on: November 09, 2021, 10:41:16 am »
So... it also has a taxidermied dog, who became famous enough after 3 years at the station to be remembered. Is the dog still there I wonder.

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yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1304 on: November 09, 2021, 10:03:42 pm »

However, I'd like to propose Slough Railway Station for a proxime accessit.  From the early days of Railway building in Britain, for a while it served as the station for Windsor Castle (until the branch line was built into Windsor).


I once saved a man's life on Slough station.
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Synistor 303

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1305 on: November 09, 2021, 11:25:59 pm »

However, I'd like to propose Slough Railway Station for a proxime accessit.  From the early days of Railway building in Britain, for a while it served as the station for Windsor Castle (until the branch line was built into Windsor).


I once saved a man's life on Slough station.

You can't just drop that information and not tell us the whole story! What did you do? Push his fiancée onto the train tracks? Perform the Heimlich manoeuvre? Stop him from eating kale? Please elaborate...

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1306 on: November 10, 2021, 05:45:06 pm »

However, I'd like to propose Slough Railway Station for a proxime accessit.  From the early days of Railway building in Britain, for a while it served as the station for Windsor Castle (until the branch line was built into Windsor).


I once saved a man's life on Slough station.

You can't just drop that information and not tell us the whole story! What did you do? Push his fiancée onto the train tracks? Perform the Heimlich manoeuvre? Stop him from eating kale? Please elaborate...

*Ponders while listening to the"Blue Danibe*

Was the fiancée very ugly, abusive, or otherwise noxious to well-being?

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1307 on: November 10, 2021, 07:42:15 pm »
OK, here it is:



The train was departing from Slough Station towards Twyford and thence onto Henley. As the train started to move on its journey, the platform signal having been given, whistle blown, a pair of suited legs appeared at the top of the old staircase, two shiny shoes moving in a hurry. A formally attired chap with a briefcase in hand came flying down the steps and took four or five long running steps to catch up with the now moving train and with his left hand still clutching the briefcase he deftly opened the door. The carriages at that time were equipped with those old-style slam doors which meant it was possible to get into or out of a moving train without raising any sort of alarm. His right hand grabbed the chrome handle that these old carriages always sported, just to the right of the door opening, and with that stabilising him, he was able to increase his pace to match that of the now rapidly accelerating train. To say he was making long loping steps at high speed would be to deny the capability of the locomotive to accelerate a man beyond his natural running capabilties. He was now moving probably faster than his body had ever moved outside of a speeding car or train and those long loping and running steps were now merely keeping him upright. It has to be stated that he no longer had any capability of getting into the train.



The train was accelerating rapidly with a complete lack of knowledge that one of its commuters was on the exterior of the train, still trying to get in. This is England and typically we don't ride on the outside of trains, it is frowned upon. This commuter hadn't planned on doing that as he thought he would be able to use his arms and legs to propel himself in to the interior - but he had calculated incorrectly.  

The arm that was previously being used to hold the handle to gain entry was now the only thing keeping the man upright, his hand gripping the that handle with all his might. His legs were now doing nothing but stopping his body from being pulled and dragged along by the now speeding train. To make things much worse, the long station platform that his legs were pushing against was just about to end. His left hand could do nothing whilst still gripping that briefcase that he seemingly could not let go of.  Soon, he would be hanging, one-handedly from a train accelerating hard toward 60-70 miles per hour, he would lose grip and be dashed to the ground to be smashed into railside equipment or dragged under the train's wheels and a certain death. Running along at 30+ mph is not something the body normally does naturally especially alongside a hurtling lump of whirring machinery, metal and stationary concrete, so the look of terror on the chap's face as he realised his predicament was an appalling sight to see.

Inside the carriage, six English commuters sat, three in a line, facing the other three. A long day behind them, a tiring journey ahead, each with a newspaper, magazine or book to while away the time without socially interacting with any other human. If you've travelled and commuted in an English train on a regular basis you will know that there is no worse thing than to interact embarrassingly with any other person on the train. Here was the worst sort of embarrassment you could imagine about to happen. This chap was about to die in a painful and embarrassing and possible messy manner on the end of Slough station platform. That was a social predicamernt of the worst sort.  You could almost hear the mental exclamations of "oh dear..." and "oh no, please make it go away". In a typically English fashion absolutely no-one stood up to help this poor chap. In all that had happened to him so far the end was going to amount to the worst sort of embarrassment an English commuter could cope with. I could feel six faces turn away to look down firmly into their newspapers, it was just all too embarrassing.

At this point I summed up what was going to happen to this chap and what I could do to prevent it. I am not one of those people that shy away from danger and that has led me into some very strange situations and not a few close scrapes.

In those times of anxiety, fear and stress you can find yourself capable of analysing everything about you, weighing the risks and then deciding with extreme accuracy what the best action would be. You can do this in very short time.



I found myself looking at the solid chrome luggage rack above the three commuters on the left. I grabbed that with my left hand and firmly anchored myself to the train. I braced my legs and plunged my torso out through the door into the stream of fast moving wind. At this point the man's legs gave way and he began to be dragged by the train. His remaining lifetime was now measured in seconds. The other commuters in the train changed the page to the next chapter or filled a line in the crossword.

I hung out of the train.

I looked at the man and made a decision that the only way I was going to save him was by grabbing his neck by his shirt and tie, that was all I could reach. I didn't discern between cloth, neck and skin, I just grabbed hard, dug in my hands and nails and pulled with all my might. I was strong when young, athletic build, wiry and naturally capable, not so much now. I pulled myself and the man into the train carriage flinging him into the interior and safety. I pulled the door closed.

If this had been an American train full of optimistic and upbeat Yanks, at this point I would hear cheers of "Woah, well done!" and "awesome man!" and suchlike. However, this was an English commuter train and I had committed possibly the ultimate faux pas. I'd had saved someone's life in the most embarrassing manner for all concerned, highlighting the fact that none of them had done anything at all to save him nor help me. To a man, everyone lowered their eyes and continued to read the next page in their book.

The poor chap who had been saved? His windpipe and neck having been forcibly crushed by his saviour just let out a choked and strangled "euuch- thanks..."  and as this was the single most embarrassing moment of his life, he too exited the situation as quickly as possible.

In any other country I would probably be lauded as the hero of the moment, as it was I was left there thinking simply "oh well, another day..."

« Last Edit: November 10, 2021, 11:07:14 pm by yereverluvinunclebert »

Synistor 303

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1308 on: November 11, 2021, 02:01:40 am »
OK, here it is:



The train was departing from Slough Station towards Twyford and thence onto Henley. As the train started to move on its journey, the platform signal having been given, whistle blown, a pair of suited legs appeared at the top of the old staircase, two shiny shoes moving in a hurry. A formally attired chap with a briefcase in hand came flying down the steps and took four or five long running steps to catch up with the now moving train and with his left hand still clutching the briefcase he deftly opened the door. The carriages at that time were equipped with those old-style slam doors which meant it was possible to get into or out of a moving train without raising any sort of alarm. His right hand grabbed the chrome handle that these old carriages always sported, just to the right of the door opening, and with that stabilising him, he was able to increase his pace to match that of the now rapidly accelerating train. To say he was making long loping steps at high speed would be to deny the capability of the locomotive to accelerate a man beyond his natural running capabilties. He was now moving probably faster than his body had ever moved outside of a speeding car or train and those long loping and running steps were now merely keeping him upright. It has to be stated that he no longer had any capability of getting into the train.



The train was accelerating rapidly with a complete lack of knowledge that one of its commuters was on the exterior of the train, still trying to get in. This is England and typically we don't ride on the outside of trains, it is frowned upon. This commuter hadn't planned on doing that as he thought he would be able to use his arms and legs to propel himself in to the interior - but he had calculated incorrectly.  

The arm that was previously being used to hold the handle to gain entry was now the only thing keeping the man upright, his hand gripping the that handle with all his might. His legs were now doing nothing but stopping his body from being pulled and dragged along by the now speeding train. To make things much worse, the long station platform that his legs were pushing against was just about to end. His left hand could do nothing whilst still gripping that briefcase that he seemingly could not let go of.  Soon, he would be hanging, one-handedly from a train accelerating hard toward 60-70 miles per hour, he would lose grip and be dashed to the ground to be smashed into railside equipment or dragged under the train's wheels and a certain death. Running along at 30+ mph is not something the body normally does naturally especially alongside a hurtling lump of whirring machinery, metal and stationary concrete, so the look of terror on the chap's face as he realised his predicament was an appalling sight to see.

Inside the carriage, six English commuters sat, three in a line, facing the other three. A long day behind them, a tiring journey ahead, each with a newspaper, magazine or book to while away the time without socially interacting with any other human. If you've travelled and commuted in an English train on a regular basis you will know that there is no worse thing than to interact embarrassingly with any other person on the train. Here was the worst sort of embarrassment you could imagine about to happen. This chap was about to die in a painful and embarrassing and possible messy manner on the end of Slough station platform. That was a social predicamernt of the worst sort.  You could almost hear the mental exclamations of "oh dear..." and "oh no, please make it go away". In a typically English fashion absolutely no-one stood up to help this poor chap. In all that had happened to him so far the end was going to amount to the worst sort of embarrassment an English commuter could cope with. I could feel six faces turn away to look down firmly into their newspapers, it was just all too embarrassing.

At this point I summed up what was going to happen to this chap and what I could do to prevent it. I am not one of those people that shy away from danger and that has led me into some very strange situations and not a few close scrapes.

In those times of anxiety, fear and stress you can find yourself capable of analysing everything about you, weighing the risks and then deciding with extreme accuracy what the best action would be. You can do this in very short time.



I found myself looking at the solid chrome luggage rack above the three commuters on the left. I grabbed that with my left hand and firmly anchored myself to the train. I braced my legs and plunged my torso out through the door into the stream of fast moving wind. At this point the man's legs gave way and he began to be dragged by the train. His remaining lifetime was now measured in seconds. The other commuters in the train changed the page to the next chapter or filled a line in the crossword.

I hung out of the train.

I looked at the man and made a decision that the only way I was going to save him was by grabbing his neck by his shirt and tie, that was all I could reach. I didn't discern between cloth, neck and skin, I just grabbed hard, dug in my hands and nails and pulled with all my might. I was strong when young, athletic build, wiry and naturally capable, not so much now. I pulled myself and the man into the train carriage flinging him into the interior and safety. I pulled the door closed.

If this had been an American train full of optimistic and upbeat Yanks, at this point I would hear cheers of "Woah, well done!" and "awesome man!" and suchlike. However, this was an English commuter train and I had committed possibly the ultimate faux pas. I'd had saved someone's life in the most embarrassing manner for all concerned, highlighting the fact that none of them had done anything at all to save him nor help me. To a man, everyone lowered their eyes and continued to read the next page in their book.

The poor chap who had been saved? His windpipe and neck having been forcibly crushed by his saviour just let out a choked and strangled "euuch- thanks..."  and as this was the single most embarrassing moment of his life, he too exited the situation as quickly as possible.

In any other country I would probably be lauded as the hero of the moment, as it was I was left there thinking simply "oh well, another day..."



Well done! (Although it was terribly bad from to embarrass the other commuters like that...)

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1309 on: November 11, 2021, 05:22:56 pm »
OK, here it is:



The train was departing from Slough Station towards Twyford and thence onto Henley. As the train started to move on its journey, the platform signal having been given, whistle blown, a pair of suited legs appeared at the top of the old staircase, two shiny shoes moving in a hurry. A formally attired chap with a briefcase in hand came flying down the steps and took four or five long running steps to catch up with the now moving train and with his left hand still clutching the briefcase he deftly opened the door. The carriages at that time were equipped with those old-style slam doors which meant it was possible to get into or out of a moving train without raising any sort of alarm. His right hand grabbed the chrome handle that these old carriages always sported, just to the right of the door opening, and with that stabilising him, he was able to increase his pace to match that of the now rapidly accelerating train. To say he was making long loping steps at high speed would be to deny the capability of the locomotive to accelerate a man beyond his natural running capabilties. He was now moving probably faster than his body had ever moved outside of a speeding car or train and those long loping and running steps were now merely keeping him upright. It has to be stated that he no longer had any capability of getting into the train.



The train was accelerating rapidly with a complete lack of knowledge that one of its commuters was on the exterior of the train, still trying to get in. This is England and typically we don't ride on the outside of trains, it is frowned upon. This commuter hadn't planned on doing that as he thought he would be able to use his arms and legs to propel himself in to the interior - but he had calculated incorrectly.  

The arm that was previously being used to hold the handle to gain entry was now the only thing keeping the man upright, his hand gripping the that handle with all his might. His legs were now doing nothing but stopping his body from being pulled and dragged along by the now speeding train. To make things much worse, the long station platform that his legs were pushing against was just about to end. His left hand could do nothing whilst still gripping that briefcase that he seemingly could not let go of.  Soon, he would be hanging, one-handedly from a train accelerating hard toward 60-70 miles per hour, he would lose grip and be dashed to the ground to be smashed into railside equipment or dragged under the train's wheels and a certain death. Running along at 30+ mph is not something the body normally does naturally especially alongside a hurtling lump of whirring machinery, metal and stationary concrete, so the look of terror on the chap's face as he realised his predicament was an appalling sight to see.

Inside the carriage, six English commuters sat, three in a line, facing the other three. A long day behind them, a tiring journey ahead, each with a newspaper, magazine or book to while away the time without socially interacting with any other human. If you've travelled and commuted in an English train on a regular basis you will know that there is no worse thing than to interact embarrassingly with any other person on the train. Here was the worst sort of embarrassment you could imagine about to happen. This chap was about to die in a painful and embarrassing and possible messy manner on the end of Slough station platform. That was a social predicamernt of the worst sort.  You could almost hear the mental exclamations of "oh dear..." and "oh no, please make it go away". In a typically English fashion absolutely no-one stood up to help this poor chap. In all that had happened to him so far the end was going to amount to the worst sort of embarrassment an English commuter could cope with. I could feel six faces turn away to look down firmly into their newspapers, it was just all too embarrassing.

At this point I summed up what was going to happen to this chap and what I could do to prevent it. I am not one of those people that shy away from danger and that has led me into some very strange situations and not a few close scrapes.

In those times of anxiety, fear and stress you can find yourself capable of analysing everything about you, weighing the risks and then deciding with extreme accuracy what the best action would be. You can do this in very short time.



I found myself looking at the solid chrome luggage rack above the three commuters on the left. I grabbed that with my left hand and firmly anchored myself to the train. I braced my legs and plunged my torso out through the door into the stream of fast moving wind. At this point the man's legs gave way and he began to be dragged by the train. His remaining lifetime was now measured in seconds. The other commuters in the train changed the page to the next chapter or filled a line in the crossword.

I hung out of the train.

I looked at the man and made a decision that the only way I was going to save him was by grabbing his neck by his shirt and tie, that was all I could reach. I didn't discern between cloth, neck and skin, I just grabbed hard, dug in my hands and nails and pulled with all my might. I was strong when young, athletic build, wiry and naturally capable, not so much now. I pulled myself and the man into the train carriage flinging him into the interior and safety. I pulled the door closed.

If this had been an American train full of optimistic and upbeat Yanks, at this point I would hear cheers of "Woah, well done!" and "awesome man!" and suchlike. However, this was an English commuter train and I had committed possibly the ultimate faux pas. I'd had saved someone's life in the most embarrassing manner for all concerned, highlighting the fact that none of them had done anything at all to save him nor help me. To a man, everyone lowered their eyes and continued to read the next page in their book.

The poor chap who had been saved? His windpipe and neck having been forcibly crushed by his saviour just let out a choked and strangled "euuch- thanks..."  and as this was the single most embarrassing moment of his life, he too exited the situation as quickly as possible.

In any other country I would probably be lauded as the hero of the moment, as it was I was left there thinking simply "oh well, another day..."



Huzzah! Good show, Uncle Bert. That's quite a story, but sorry to hear you had to deal with the Brit equivalent of the"Bushido Code" in the aftermath. I would have done something remarkably silly to embarrass them further! O don't know, something like the"chicken dance."

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1310 on: November 12, 2021, 05:50:12 am »
Excellent My Good Uncle Bert!

you  saved another's life without harming yourself!
You succesfully performed the penultimate challenge any human could face!

Your karmic burden has been AT LEAST balanced,
whilst the burden of the bystanders has increased measurabley....

I would like to lead a hearty round of THREE CHEERS for Uncle Bert!

the world needs more like him.

yhs
prof mumbles

HIP HIP!

HIP HIP!

HIP HIP!
MIGRATION to Spare Goggles under way

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1311 on: November 14, 2021, 09:19:00 pm »
Christian Youth Association Building open to the public in 1910, and first stone laid by Mexican President Porfirio Diaz in 1909, Mexico City. Thomas S Gore, architect. Photo is undated, via Irene Bárcenas, @barcenairene on Twitter. Note the Ford auto dealer sign on the right side of the building.


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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1312 on: November 23, 2021, 04:14:34 am »
Private residence of Mme. Francisca Ybañez, valued at $12,000 Mexican Pesos in 1900
(Photograph is undated).


« Last Edit: November 23, 2021, 04:16:20 am by J. Wilhelm »

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1313 on: November 23, 2021, 10:56:00 am »
Christian Youth Association Building open to the public in 1910

Photo from today required.

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1314 on: November 23, 2021, 05:39:02 pm »
Christian Youth Association Building open to the public in 1910

Photo from today required.

Do you mean all buildings must be extant? Was that an original restriction set by the OP for this thread?

The building in question is located on No. Balderas Street. It became the (old) Novedades newspaper headquarters later in the 20th century. The photo below was taken in 1987. I don't know if I can get a more recent photograph... Making all photos updated to the present year would be exceedingly difficult, and not practical.

« Last Edit: November 23, 2021, 05:54:37 pm by J. Wilhelm »

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1315 on: November 23, 2021, 08:17:52 pm »
Every photo I submit, the building is still standing. If you have to post a photo of something special long past then a current photo to mark the spot seems the least you can do. I had an expectation that most if not all those that you posted were still standing unless specifically told otherwise. Of course, the thread name could be changed to "once-steamy piles of rubble that indicated the spot where a fine building used to be..."  - to accommodate.

Honestly, if I included buildings in Britain that were once Steamy then we would be here every day, five times a day, five buildings per post for the next five years and we probably still would have not touched the surface.

Let's keep it 'real' shall we?

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1316 on: November 24, 2021, 05:45:48 am »
Every photo I submit, the building is still standing. If you have to post a photo of something special long past then a current photo to mark the spot seems the least you can do. I had an expectation that most if not all those that you posted were still standing unless specifically told otherwise. Of course, the thread name could be changed to "once-steamy piles of rubble that indicated the spot where a fine building used to be..."  - to accommodate.

Honestly, if I included buildings in Britain that were once Steamy then we would be here every day, five times a day, five buildings per post for the next five years and we probably still would have not touched the surface.

Let's keep it 'real' shall we?

Well, then. I'll do my best, but please note that, in fact, most of the photos I've posted are of extant buildings indeed, save a few black and white pictures in the last few pages, mostly private mansions and such, which did not survive the 1930s, and where I usually dated the building/ photo/ and if I remember correctly, I usually talk about the reason why the building was not standing (One or two of the multiple Scherer mansions come to mind).

For example, one of the two US ambassador residences during the 1913 civil war incursion into the capital city was demolished (A. Armour residence) but the other is very much standing, and I even indicated that it was available for commercial use, plus a link to the realtor website). The automobile club on Chapultepec Lake is in fact standing ("House on the Lake") and currently in use by the national university (I believe I expounded on that sundry pictures). So yes, most buildings are standing. You can expect that black and white street views with skylines prior to the 1920s may not look the same, as many buildings have disappeared, however.

I'll post historical photos of non extant buildings on a new thread "The way the World Was" or something along those lines.

The building above is still standing as this Novedades article points out. The building survived the Mexican civil war of 1910-20, the 1930's expansion of avenues downtown, and the 1985 earthquake, it's still there probably commanding a seven figure monthly rent in US dollars, now occupied by Milenio Group and Channel 6 broadcast TV. You can see more pictures in the article.

https://www.eluniversal.com.mx/opinion/mochilazo-en-el-tiempo/el-olvidado-edificio-de-novedades

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1317 on: November 27, 2021, 08:46:30 pm »
In 1885 Cuban cigar impresario, Ernesto Pugibet, decided to establish one of the largest cigar manufacturing plants in downtown Mexico City. To accommodate executives and workers, Pugilet built a residential apartment building large enough to encompass three closed streets. The building is now known as the Edificio Mascota (Mascot Building), after the name of one of the three dead end streets, themselves named after the three cigar brands sold by Pugibet: Gardenia, La Mascota, and Ideal. The sprawling apartment complex includes 174  apartment units plus a number of street level commercial units facing the streets external to the building. La Mascota wasn't finished until 1912.

La Mascota Building in Mexico City, between the present day streets of Bucareli, Abraham González and Turín
 https://www.arquine.com/vivienda-y-tabaco/




View from Gardenia Street at midnight

« Last Edit: November 27, 2021, 08:51:18 pm by J. Wilhelm »

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1318 on: November 27, 2021, 09:09:53 pm »
Images below from @cronicas_ciudad (Crónicas de una ciudad perdida/ Chronicles of a lost City) on Twitter unless otherwise noted.

A rare side view of the Palacio de Correos (Postal Palace) in downtown CDMX


University Club Building on Reforma Avenue


Hotel Imperial on Reforma Avenue. Estd. 1904, then and now (I like these midnights pictures)



Entryway of the Lamm Residence in Roma Borough, central Mexico City.
Built as a private residence in 1911, it became a cultural center in 1993.


rather interesting view of the Boker House in the historic centre of Mexico City

A curiosity in Roma Borough. This old car is also a giant music box. With a mannequin for a driver, a speaker in the car plays old tunes for pedestrians at certain times of the day. Images by @cesarbuenrostro on Twitter







« Last Edit: November 27, 2021, 10:23:03 pm by J. Wilhelm »

von Corax

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1319 on: November 27, 2021, 10:35:24 pm »
I have a mental image of that car converted to a low-rider, so it can dance along with its own music.
By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
By the Beans of Life do my thoughts acquire speed
My hands acquire a shaking
The shaking becomes a warning
By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
The Leverkusen Institute of Paleocybernetics is 5821 km from Reading

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1320 on: November 27, 2021, 11:47:18 pm »
I have a mental image of that car converted to a low-rider, so it can dance along with its own music.
I'm under the impression that the whole chassis has been replaced with concrete. It's only the outer body that remains.

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1321 on: November 28, 2021, 07:07:05 pm »
What happens when you need to build a skyscraper, but you don't want to demolish a historical building? The photo below shows the O'Hea Manor, a 1928 structure built mostly from pink volcanic sedimentary stone, in the"Gothic Jacobethan Revival" style, and which literally is enclosed within the footprint of Torre Reforma. Torre Reforma was the highest skyscraper in Mexico City and Latin America as of 2016. Torre Reforma is one of the newest buildings in CDMX, probably finished and opened to the public just before or during the pandemic. I need to check those facts, the wikipedia entry is outdated, but here's a fantastic blogspot article on the residence (worth a look):

https://grandescasasdemexico.blogspot.com/2013/02/casa-ohea-austin-torre-reforma-macstore.html?m=1

To appreciate the lengths to which the architects went to save the house, please look at the photos in the blogspot article (there's too many for me to post. The house, nay the castle like building, in fact had to be lifted and moved from the center of the property to the front of it to make room for the giant skyscraper's foundation. All  photos below are shared from this blogspot magazine on Mexican houses, unless otherwise noted.

The O'Hea Residence (Casa O'Hea) on the base of Torre Reforma today


Torre Reforma today, Cuauhtémoc Borough, near Roma Borough, Mexico City.


How it looked in 1936


How it looked in 2013 during construction


Sadly the elegant interior of the Gothic Revival building was turned into a "MacStore." Image from Google Maps
*author goes into epileptic convulsions*




More images forthcoming... There's s history to the interior of the house, which included medieval styled vaulted ceilings and a restaurant.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2021, 08:47:12 pm by J. Wilhelm »

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1322 on: November 28, 2021, 11:03:58 pm »
Poor thing.

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1323 on: November 29, 2021, 02:41:44 am »
Poor thing.

The fact that it was moved without disassembly, being mostly made from stone is remarkable. These old buildings command very high rents. I can't imagine the rent Apple pays, but you can be assured is definitely over 6 figures and likely 7 in US dollars of I judge by the house which housed the second 1913 American Embassy. These old European styled buildings traditionally hosted big fashion names like Louis Vuitton, Dolce & Gabbana, Rolex, Gucci, etc.

Tells you the kind of market you have for Apple products and what kind of niche they're trying to cultivate. Mexicans are among the most loyal name brand customers I know. Companies can be rewarded handsomely over many decades if they can make the case that "they are the best," like Sony was since the 1970s. By the 1990s Sony had partnered with Ericsson when the telephone company was sold it back to Ericsson after being nationalized since the 1940s. Such was the recognition that they flooded the market with Sony Ericsson cellular phones and Sony computers.

A Libanese - Mexican businessman by the name of Carlos Slim ripped the old Telmex cables throughout the country, an area equivalent to all of Western Europe and rewired with the latest tech (90s/2000s) with cellular towers, and thus he became one of the richest men in the world. All made possible with Sony as the household name. "Shut up and take my money"

Yeah. You want the market? Then you'll have no problem paying millions in rent. Save the house.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2021, 02:44:20 am by J. Wilhelm »

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1324 on: January 19, 2022, 05:16:50 am »
At the risk posting,only to have another Brassgoggles Blackout, I'll copy and paste my post from Spare Goggles:

From January 2, 2022

Moving on, I have got a couple of pictures to show. All were taken during my walk en route to the bus stop on 6th Street, Downtown Austin.


I'll start with The Flower Hill Urban Homestead Museum

The homestead was built by the Smoot Family, who were prominent civil servants and philanthropists who arrived in Austin sometime after 1877


The video below gives a history of the Smoot family who owned it, with sundry historical photographs

Flower Hill Foundation