Author Topic: Steamy Steampunk Buildings  (Read 159456 times)

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1275 on: August 07, 2021, 04:18:48 pm »
Oops. I forgot to post the Texas Governor's Mansion, which is walking distance too.

Image CC BY SA 3.0, Larry D. Moore

E.J.MonCrieff

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1276 on: August 08, 2021, 06:00:05 pm »
After seeing the photographs of Southport recently posted here, I was reminded of the iron roof of Cardiff Central Market.  Though there is a Wikipedia entry for the market
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardiff_Market
unfortunately none of the pictures shows the roof.

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1277 on: August 08, 2021, 07:35:15 pm »
A little bit of searching is always useful.











Steampunk Widgets and Icons of Some Worldwide Repute

Mercury Wells

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1278 on: August 08, 2021, 08:07:46 pm »
 Bugger it! you can find your own pictures to put up.

Cardiff's Castle Arcade



Hayes Island Snack Bar
« Last Edit: May 17, 2022, 07:26:37 pm by Mercury Wells »
Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

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J. Wilhelm

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1279 on: August 08, 2021, 11:33:25 pm »
When I can, I'll start with a series on Louisiana architecture. The French Quarter is the oldest part of the New Orleans, and before the 1810s it contained a number of French and Spanish styled houses, mansions, and apartment buildings, but most of what remains today, about ⅔, is "Second Generation Criole" styled buildings, as the rest was lost to fires and aging over time.

A mansion on St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans


A Créole Townhouse on St. Charles Avenue

« Last Edit: August 08, 2021, 11:44:21 pm by J. Wilhelm »

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1280 on: August 09, 2021, 06:01:58 pm »

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1281 on: August 14, 2021, 12:46:55 am »
One of the nice things about commuting downtown, is that you get to discover hidden treasures on any corner. I caught this old Vicwardian firehouse still being used for its intended purpose today.

An old turn of the century firehouse still in use today on Guadalupe Street, Austin, Texas.
 




It's really hard to capture things on camera on a moving bus. You see, the whole of Downtown is under construction with brand new skyscrapers going up every year. These new monstrosities are completely changing the skyline at an incredible speed. Most streets are full of potholes, blockages and detours. Areas where rows of Victorian homes existed in a residential area close to the river are now flanked on all sides by gigantic glass towers that didn't exist 3 years ago! If it were not for most Victorian homes being purchased by private business (typically attorney firms, doctor offices, and the like), many of those Victorian homes would simply have been bulldozed. The trade-off is that the tiny homes are now invisible in a forest of glass.


I caught two more large buildings on camera among the glass towers which I didn't list above. Maybe when the weather is not so hot I will take a walking tour of downtown.

This one is near 12th street and Guadalupe



And the Texas Capitol deserves its own page.



« Last Edit: August 23, 2021, 01:59:32 am by J. Wilhelm »

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1282 on: August 18, 2021, 08:14:20 am »
More photos from my commute. This time I found out the hard way, that some bus routes don't operate all year long. I had to improvise a substitute route. Again you get to see some interesting sites. Not all is steamy, but it shows the diversity and opulence of the old "Tarrytown, " a neighborhood of old Austin on the banks of the Colorado River. Few Victorian houses still stand, but that is the right location to find unlisted Victorian homes. I apologize for the non steamyness of these photos, I'm still finding my way around the area, I'll start posting actual Victorian house pics from up close soon, hopefully.

The University of Texas has a golf course along the river over land leased from the city, and  they own some 1960s Era dormitories for college students or young families. On the South side you have some multi-million dollar mansions, I'm guessing built in the last 25 years, between $3 and $5 million dollars hanging on the hills next to the river.

Some mansions on the south side of the Colorado River




Some 1960s college dormitories along the banks of the river



And right behind, an apartment complex for the well heeled, I imagine around $2500 /month for a 1 bedroom 1 bath flat. You can tell by the money spent on the facade of the buildings.






J. Wilhelm

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1283 on: August 21, 2021, 02:02:53 am »
I passed this house on the bus, but I just had no chance to take a picture of it. Registered as a historical building, the Daniel H Caswell House is located on West Avenue, near crossing with Enfield, in Austin Texas. The house showcases a type of "rough look" used in limestone blocks for turn of the century homes.

The Daniel H. Caswell House, built in 1900, near 15th Street, corner with West Ave., Austin, Texas

Image by David E Hollingsworth, 2005, CC by SA 3.0 License


The house, apparently, is a public attraction, and in fact, years ago I had posted a similar Victorian Era house in that was available for lease during special events. They have a website associated with the property:

https://www.caswellhouse.org/
« Last Edit: August 21, 2021, 02:08:13 am by J. Wilhelm »

E.J.MonCrieff

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1284 on: August 22, 2021, 03:41:58 pm »
In the news this weekend is the Tyne Swing Bridge. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:High_Level_Bridge_and_Swing_Bridge_-_Newcastle_Upon_Tyne_-_England_-_14082004.jpg

Opened in 1876, it is apparently the world's largest swing bridge.  The full wikipedia entry is at

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swing_Bridge,_River_Tyne

The press reports I've seen are incomplete, but apparently a pressure valve has failed deep in the bowels of the machinery.

Hurricane Annie

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1285 on: August 22, 2021, 05:10:13 pm »



 
The comments on here are quite quaint and naively amusing. {should children really be playing in the gardens of gentlemen clubs?}
 
https://timespanner.blogspot.com/2011/09/some-onehunga-landmarks.html?m=1

 

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1286 on: August 22, 2021, 05:23:34 pm »


 Here is an article from last year. News in Nelson New Zealand.

"If you've got a few million spare and fancy living in one of New Zealand's oldest homes, then there's plenty of properties to choose from in Nelson.

There are a handful of stately homes currently on the market in the top of the south, including the 166-year old Warwick House with its four-level turret, or the 14-bedroom Fellworth House nestled at the foot of Botanical Hill. "

 There are a selection of heritage landmarksfor sale 
 
 https://i.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/118076693/want-a-historic-mansion-theres-several-on-the-market-to-choose-from-in-nelson






 

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1287 on: August 22, 2021, 09:12:59 pm »

SNIP
 

Unfortunately, I don't have a few million to spare, but it's surprising - at least on my part of the world) how many unlisted Victorian homes you can find. We're really not very good at protecting old properties, and it falls to the private market to do that job. We have many smaller Victorian homes along West Street and downtown that were taken over and renovated by doctors and attorneys (solicitors) for office use. Hence, they're not registered as historical landmarks and through renovation they don't even look that old. I don't think any of the smaller wooden Vicwardian homes command even a million, probably half as much or less, but nevertheless should be conserved. Many of those were transformed in the 1920s, so it's difficult to recognize the style.

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1288 on: August 22, 2021, 10:52:45 pm »

SNIP
 

Unfortunately, I don't have a few million to spare, but it's surprising - at least on my part of the world) how many unlisted Victorian homes you can find. We're really not very good at protecting old properties, and it falls to the private market to do that job. We have many smaller Victorian homes along West Street and downtown that were taken over and renovated by doctors and attorneys (solicitors) for office use. Hence, they're not registered as historical landmarks and through renovation they don't even look that old. I don't think any of the smaller wooden Vicwardian homes command even a million, probably half as much or less, but nevertheless should be conserved. Many of those were transformed in the 1920s, so it's difficult to recognize the style.

 Buildings in NZ  do not go very far back. Mid 1800s  at the easiest.  Houses in certain areas have garnered automatic  heritage  listing for pre 1945 buildings. Roughly the areas where doctors and attorney live.

 The general rule is that houses in pockets the early soldier settlers lived retain the highest values. They were known as The Defencibles, shortened to 'Fencibles.. The tiny prefab cojoined  cottages  they were given  are known as Fencible cottages. Officers were provided  bigger homes, or villa

 I Grew up in Cockle Bay. There was little evidence of Settlers by that time. Mostly 60s and 70s subdivisions. With a few 1920s beach cottages {bach}  and farmlets left.

https://www.times.co.nz/news/howicks-history-last-fencible-died-in-1902/
.
https://wargaming.info/2008/maori-wars-colonial-new-zealand-buildings/



A typical Fencible Cottage looking it’s best – in reality they may not have looked quite so ‘spic & span’ when originally built! The chimney marks the point where the dividing wall cuts it in half! This is much smaller than it looks in the photo!
"The Fencibles themselves had even bigger issues – while they had been promised a cottage and land in return for forming a militia they actually had no source of income. The tiny plot of land with their cottage was further reduced by the act of halving each cottage site to make two, so effectively they often had perhaps a 6′-12′ strip of land around the edge of the cottage and a larger 12′-20′ square ‘back yard’ at the rear – in variably all this area was put to use growing food (Vegetables, Corn, Potato, Maori Potato, even Taro) and tobacco, the latter could be traded and was a fairly valuable commodity for bartering. Meanwhile it took the government several years to get around to building all the cottages it had promised during the recruiting drive from 1847-54 – I think the last one’s weren’t built until as late as 1860 or so."

 

 

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1289 on: August 23, 2021, 01:31:36 am »

SNIP
 

Unfortunately, I don't have a few million to spare, but it's surprising - at least on my part of the world) how many unlisted Victorian homes you can find. We're really not very good at protecting old properties, and it falls to the private market to do that job. We have many smaller Victorian homes along West Street and downtown that were taken over and renovated by doctors and attorneys (solicitors) for office use. Hence, they're not registered as historical landmarks and through renovation they don't even look that old. I don't think any of the smaller wooden Vicwardian homes command even a million, probably half as much or less, but nevertheless should be conserved. Many of those were transformed in the 1920s, so it's difficult to recognize the style.

 Buildings in NZ  do not go very far back. Mid 1800s  at the easiest.  Houses in certain areas have garnered automatic  heritage  listing for pre 1945 buildings. Roughly the areas where doctors and attorney live.

 The general rule is that houses in pockets the early soldier settlers lived retain the highest values. They were known as The Defencibles, shortened to 'Fencibles.. The tiny prefab cojoined  cottages  they were given  are known as Fencible cottages. Officers were provided  bigger homes, or villa

 I Grew up in Cockle Bay. There was little evidence of Settlers by that time. Mostly 60s and 70s subdivisions. With a few 1920s beach cottages {bach}  and farmlets left.

https://www.times.co.nz/news/howicks-history-last-fencible-died-in-1902/
.
https://wargaming.info/2008/maori-wars-colonial-new-zealand-buildings/



A typical Fencible Cottage looking it’s best – in reality they may not have looked quite so ‘spic & span’ when originally built! The chimney marks the point where the dividing wall cuts it in half! This is much smaller than it looks in the photo!
"The Fencibles themselves had even bigger issues – while they had been promised a cottage and land in return for forming a militia they actually had no source of income. The tiny plot of land with their cottage was further reduced by the act of halving each cottage site to make two, so effectively they often had perhaps a 6′-12′ strip of land around the edge of the cottage and a larger 12′-20′ square ‘back yard’ at the rear – in variably all this area was put to use growing food (Vegetables, Corn, Potato, Maori Potato, even Taro) and tobacco, the latter could be traded and was a fairly valuable commodity for bartering. Meanwhile it took the government several years to get around to building all the cottages it had promised during the recruiting drive from 1847-54 – I think the last one’s weren’t built until as late as 1860 or so."

 

 

That's a nice bit of history and paints a fairly good picture of the Fencibles' Cottages.

Houses in Austin will also be limited to the 19th century, unless they're Spanish or Mexican, built before 1836, for obvious reasons.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2021, 02:20:28 am by J. Wilhelm »

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1290 on: August 23, 2021, 02:03:12 am »
Now o had posted a fairly poor picture of this house above. It's actually unlisted and does not show up on Google Street maps. Whoever lives there actually managed to stop Google from taking pictures!! I can only see the outline of the house

A larger wooden Victorian home, unlisted, between 12th and 12½ Street on Guadalupe.

And a better view of Clay Pit Indian restaurant building on 16th and Guadalupe.
What do you figure was the original use of the building? Where did that 2nd storey door lead to?
A missing balcony, perhaps?
« Last Edit: August 23, 2021, 02:16:16 am by J. Wilhelm »

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1291 on: August 23, 2021, 02:49:23 am »
And a better view of Clay Pit Indian restaurant building on 16th and Guadalupe.
What do you figure was the original use of the building? Where did that 2nd storey door lead to?
A missing balcony, perhaps?
It was obviously an industrial building of some sort. The door on the first floor was a loft loading door which would likely have had a hoisting spar where the fanlight is now. Notice that the first floor fanlight is a single pane while the ground-floor fanlights are all mullioned, suggesting the former was replaced at some point.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2021, 02:52:30 am by von Corax »
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J. Wilhelm

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1292 on: August 23, 2021, 03:00:44 am »
And a better view of Clay Pit Indian restaurant building on 16th and Guadalupe.
What do you figure was the original use of the building? Where did that 2nd storey door lead to?
A missing balcony, perhaps?
It was obviously an industrial building of some sort. The door on the first floor was a loft loading door which would likely have had a hoisting spar where the fanlight is now. Notice that the first floor fanlight is a single pane while the ground-floor fanlights are all mullioned, suggesting the former was replaced at some point.
Actually, not only is it a single pane, but I think it's not glass at all. It seems painted black.

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1293 on: August 23, 2021, 04:10:56 am »
Something that I wanted to talk about but I didn't, was a building that was demolished last week, adjacent to the Clay Pit restaurant, on the north side, opposite of the wall we were talking about right now. It was an office building, which I didn't photograph two weeks ago, because I deemed it to be too modern.

It looked like a 1980s brick building, with wide square windows and metal doors, and given its location across a 1960s tower on the other side of the street, I thought it could be attached to the University, which is just a couple of blocks north from there. The building looked clean and thought nothing of it as I snapped pictures of the Clay Pit.

Later on in another trip, I saw a big hole one the roof of that office building, and then I realized it was marked for demolition. Upon closer inspection, I noticed that its southern wall had a parapet (the extension of the wall hiding the roof line)  that looked similar to the Victorian warehouses in the area, including the Clay Pit building.

I realized that it was another Victorian industrial building, but sometime in the late 70s it 80s, it was converted to a functional office building. They used the same type of brick so the additions were seamless, but they must have brought down large segments of the street side wall to add two hallways with the modern windows and steel doors. The only thing that remained of the original Victorian character of the building was that southern wall next to the Clay Pit

Last week I saw how two giant sized excavators were brought in and dispatched the building in less than two days.

I can't help but think that a similar fate frequently falls on Victorian buildings like that. When a building is renovated into a more recent style, in this volatile booming construction market, and with no protection from the state, you're sealing the fate of the building. It will be brought down when someone needs the space, to be replaced by a high tower building.

The number of new buildings in Austin is staggering. I haven't been to downtown regularly since 2005, but the skyline is unrecognizable. There are more apartment buildings and luxury towers, some very high, than I can count.  The whole of downtown is under construction. The streets are full of potholes, as the increased traffic and construction forces increased loads on roads that never were meant to carry such traffic.

The city dedicated a few lanes on the roads to bus-use only, but the routes are full of detours as new construction sites are blocking the avenues at several spots. The state can't keep up with the infrastructure as fast as they need to to service the new private construction. Again like I wrote above, Victorian homes are buried in a veritable forest of modern buildings, and few Victorian homes or industrial buildings will survive.

Seemingly you can find a new sky scraper under construction in every corner





Ugly new apartment buildings for students behind "The Drag," that is the segment of
Guadalupe along the west side of University... "Moontower"  :P


« Last Edit: August 23, 2021, 04:27:03 am by J. Wilhelm »

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1294 on: August 23, 2021, 04:19:45 am »
That building in the middle of the first photo looks like it needs its horizontal hold adjusted.

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1295 on: August 23, 2021, 04:34:55 am »
That building in the middle of the first photo looks like it needs its horizontal hold adjusted.

Done entirely on purpose, I assure you. What was not on purpose was that giant panes of glass that began to fall onto the street a few years ago. That caused an uproar.

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1296 on: September 04, 2021, 05:59:32 pm »
I got a couple more photos to post, as soon as I can. That blurry photo on the house between 12th and 12-1/2th turned out to be occupied by a law firm.


If I have enough energy, I may go downtown this Labor Day weekend to snap some photos up close.

William Caswell, son of cotton baron Daniel Caswell whose house I showed 1 page ago,
built a house across the road opposite his father's house on 15th street in 1904.
Image by Michael Brockhoff. CC BY-SA 3.0 license.



I also found an article from the Austin Chronicle, the local entertainment rag that explains the state of conservation of Victorian buildings in Austin. It's mostly done by way of private hands (conservation associations) and recognition from local government who assign committees made from citizens to grant historical status to buildings. The result is that recognition and protection of buildings is far-and-between, with mostly private owners choosing to protect those structures not recognized by the government.

https://www.austinchronicle.com/news/2021-07-02/with-equity-in-mind-austin-embarks-on-bringing-its-history-up-to-date/

When structures are not "pretty" enough to assemble an association and city committee, to designate a historical landmark, and no one buys the property with the intention to restore it, the property will fall prey to gentrification or vertical to urbanization. So virtually none of the many industrial buildings that now house live music venues and bars in downtown Austin are protected. If they can't house money making businesses, then these structures will be demolished.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2021, 12:40:54 am by J. Wilhelm »

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1297 on: October 09, 2021, 04:58:04 pm »
If you take a few minutes of free time to walk around downtown, hidden gems begin to pop up, revealing the state of disarray in historical building designations.

This one was right in front of my eyes and didn't notice until I saw the plaque. It's a recently shuttered medical office building...What will happen to the building? Hopefully the historical designation will save it.












« Last Edit: October 09, 2021, 05:01:46 pm by J. Wilhelm »

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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1298 on: October 18, 2021, 05:29:27 am »
An old mansion on Montejo Drive, City of Merida, Yucatan State, Mexico.No doubt related to the sisal and hemp industry in the 19th century.

Image posted by Prof.  Gaby Cervera Valeé, National University, Mexico.


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Re: Steamy Steampunk Buildings
« Reply #1299 on: October 24, 2021, 05:29:54 pm »