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Author Topic: Steamy Steampunk Buildings  (Read 110470 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1125 on: September 07, 2020, 09:39:49 pm »


It reminds me of the old Michigan State Police posts:

This same identical building can be found along the old highways all over Michigan.

The stone entrance to the building is a dead giveaway this is possibly an Art Déco era building. Possibly 1940s. Even though the building is not Art Déco.
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« Reply #1126 on: September 08, 2020, 04:09:16 am »

A lot of the old Australian two storey buildings often have the top balcony filled in, especially if they are no longer residential. They often have other additions. You sort have to look hard to try and date the buildings.

Sorontar,
who is watching a series called Further Back in Time for Dinner, for which the production team renovates the inside of a country colonial-style homestead to "match" a different decade from 1900s-1940s each week. Last week (1900-1909) had no electricity, only briefly metered gas and a meat-safe while the "acting" family escaped the plague in Sydney (they filmed it at the start of the year and had no idea about the pandemic - their main concern was the bushfires!). This week (1910-1919) they will get a refrigerator I think!
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« Reply #1127 on: September 08, 2020, 08:05:22 am »

Residential or not, means little. The verandahs ended up as enclosed galleries or even rooms on houses, because of two discoveries: mosquito-borne diseases and air conditioning. Most people with the latter would prefer more enclosed space than the risk of the former. Particularly if the house becomes units.


It reminds me of the old Michigan State Police posts:

This same identical building can be found along the old highways all over Michigan.

The stone entrance to the building is a dead giveaway this is possibly an Art Déco era building. Possibly 1940s. Even though the building is not Art Déco.
Officially opened 1946.

Some of the structures look Victorian like the Cairns Post building, a few others look like late 19th or early 20th century buildings that have been "plastered over,," so it's very difficult to tell the age of the buildings. The first two at the top are just "new" modern buildings stylised in a "conservative" architecture (I call it "Walgreen's Architecture" after the pharmacy chain in the US). I can see another few as original Art Déco, like the Jack & Newell building and the "Chambers" building. And 3 of them could have been Victorian but were built in the Art Déco era (Barrier Reef hotel was built in 1926  according to Google).

I'm quite sure these developments, then, are totally fake:




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« Reply #1128 on: September 08, 2020, 08:28:42 am »

A lot of the old Australian two storey buildings often have the top balcony filled in, especially if they are no longer residential. They often have other additions. You sort have to look hard to try and date the buildings.

Sorontar,
who is watching a series called Further Back in Time for Dinner, for which the production team renovates the inside of a country colonial-style homestead to "match" a different decade from 1900s-1940s each week. Last week (1900-1909) had no electricity, only briefly metered gas and a meat-safe while the "acting" family escaped the plague in Sydney (they filmed it at the start of the year and had no idea about the pandemic - their main concern was the bushfires!). This week (1910-1919) they will get a refrigerator I think!

Effectively that happens a lot. CDMX is chockful of Victorian Era buildings whose facades were destroyed during the civil war around 1913, and then they were rebuilt after the war in the 1920s. As a result Victorian homes and buildings turned into Art Deco buildings, and without any data, it's impossible to date.
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« Reply #1129 on: September 08, 2020, 09:07:55 am »

SNIP
I'm quite sure these developments, then, are totally fake:
SNIP

Define "fake." By that you mean "Not Victorian"? If so, then I'm sure the Cairns Post Office is not fake. And the EIG Cash & Carry building looks Victorian too. I thought at first the Grafton House and the Chambers Building (one in the corner) were Victorian, but it reads "Est. 1923" on the entablature of the Chambers Building at the corner, and the Grafton reads "1930."

I thought at first that the Barrier Reef Hotel was Victorian - certainly looks a lot like pictures of turn of the century business districts in CDMX (Mexico City), as well as certain buildings in New Orleans in the US, but Wikipedia has it listed as a 1926 structure
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barrier_Reef_Hotel

The "Boon Boon Beauty Centre: building, definitely is a modern structure -or- an older building that has been completely re-done. As well for the Evert House which reads "1962" on the entablature (try to zoom in your web browser).

There are a lot of Victorian Era establishments in Austin in the red light district (6th Street) whose Victorian buildings were so dilapidated that entirely new facades were made in the mid 19th. C. People back then didn't care to erase the Victorian aesthetic and replace it with Art Deco or something completely unrecognizable, so all you have is the outline of the "Old Wild West" styled building entablature to tell you this was possibly a Victorian building. The Keebles Building could be one of those genuinely Victorian, but barely recognizable types.  

A few businesses along Sixth Street Austin, Texas
Guess the age of the buildings


In CDMX there are a lot of buildings in Polanco Burrow, that similarly were turn of the century homes and were turned into Art Deco buildings. I think the Jack & Newell Building in Cairns is a prime candidate for that and it reads "1893" on the entablature, but I can't tell if that is the business age or the building age. I'll assume it's the building - the style is definitely redone in Art Deco.

A Louis Vuitton shop in (Presidente) Masaryk Ave. Polanco Borough, CDMX
This Victorian Era building was renovated to the point of oblivion during the 20th. C
Most likely it went through an Art Deco phase in the 1930s. It's totally unrecognizable as either.
Major structural changes were made on the facade over 100 years


Now look at this Cartier shop, also in Masaryk Ave. How old do you think it is?
The stone quoins are a dead giveaway. If the walls and roof are any indication, this could be turn of century.
But which century? 19th? or 20th?  Grin Actually it's both. A heavily renovated 1900s private house.


The last few pictures that you posted above are very difficult to date - there's no facade and could have been built at any period of time. The architecture is very traditional with what we call "wood siding" in the USA - but you can find present-day buildings that look exactly like that in the South and Eastern Seaboard of the US. There was a shopping mall along the marina of San Diego Bay in California some of whose whose buildings looked exactly like that in 1988 when I was living there. The building was meant to match older buildings in that style.

A building in Seaport Village, San Diego, California. Est. 1978
« Last Edit: September 08, 2020, 09:52:55 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #1130 on: September 08, 2020, 12:54:52 pm »

SNIP
I'm quite sure these developments, then, are totally fake:
SNIP

Define "fake." By that you mean "Not Victorian"? If so, then I'm sure the Cairns Post Office is not fake. And the EIG Cash & Carry building looks Victorian too. I thought at first the Grafton House and the Chambers Building (one in the corner) were Victorian, but it reads "Est. 1923" on the entablature of the Chambers Building at the corner, and the Grafton reads "1930."

I thought at first that the Barrier Reef Hotel was Victorian - certainly looks a lot like pictures of turn of the century business districts in CDMX (Mexico City), as well as certain buildings in New Orleans in the US, but Wikipedia has it listed as a 1926 structure
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barrier_Reef_Hotel

The "Boon Boon Beauty Centre: building, definitely is a modern structure -or- an older building that has been completely re-done. As well for the Evert House which reads "1962" on the entablature (try to zoom in your web browser).



Yes, that sort of "fake".

Sometimes some people just will not follow the latest fashions, which is why you get those pubs forty years out of date. Then again, some people may have just had the mindset of "this is what a pub looks like" and that's that.


Cairns Station, around 1940. Replaced with a brick block in 1955. Building may be the original 1890s station? Perhaps? Looks sort of like a pub...
« Last Edit: September 08, 2020, 12:59:58 pm by chironex » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1131 on: September 08, 2020, 03:30:39 pm »

SNIP
I'm quite sure these developments, then, are totally fake:
SNIP

Define "fake." By that you mean "Not Victorian"? If so, then I'm sure the Cairns Post Office is not fake. And the EIG Cash & Carry building looks Victorian too. I thought at first the Grafton House and the Chambers Building (one in the corner) were Victorian, but it reads "Est. 1923" on the entablature of the Chambers Building at the corner, and the Grafton reads "1930."

I thought at first that the Barrier Reef Hotel was Victorian - certainly looks a lot like pictures of turn of the century business districts in CDMX (Mexico City), as well as certain buildings in New Orleans in the US, but Wikipedia has it listed as a 1926 structure
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barrier_Reef_Hotel

The "Boon Boon Beauty Centre: building, definitely is a modern structure -or- an older building that has been completely re-done. As well for the Evert House which reads "1962" on the entablature (try to zoom in your web browser).



Yes, that sort of "fake".

Sometimes some people just will not follow the latest fashions, which is why you get those pubs forty years out of date. Then again, some people may have just had the mindset of "this is what a pub looks like" and that's that.


Cairns Station, around 1940. Replaced with a brick block in 1955. Building may be the original 1890s station? Perhaps? Looks sort of like a pub...


I would say that a great majority of the United States is like that. We have a very particular way of building a house. It followed us from the Wild West Era, and it just won't let go. In the United States you have to be a very eccentric billionaire who doesn't give a rat's behind about the neighborhood association to actually build a modernist house. Most neighborhoods, even in the $5 million range will not let you build a modern house.

Availability of materials is a big part of it too. North America has an abundance of forests and wood is the cheapest way to build. As soon as you cross the southern border you suddenly switch to masonry buildings. Conifer forests are not as common, and instead you have either high desert with smaller alpine forests or along the beaches dense tropical vegetation. Wood is not the first choice, and it actually is more expensive than brick, concrete or cinder block.

This architecture follows that change. Large modern brutalist structures are the order of the day, outside of Baroque architecture
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« Reply #1132 on: September 12, 2020, 04:04:38 am »

Mmmm. I think that we need a change of pace. That American Southern Plantation style is too insipid for my taste. I'm down to historical photos of Mexico City (though I don't doubt I can still get some great images of private houses). And we keep jumping to Art Deco which is outside the Victorian Era.

My inner faun is pushing me to re-visit Art Nouveau...

Let's start with these house hidden in the mountains of Central Europe.

I imagine a newwly built Art Nouveau Cottage in Hrensko, in the Czech Republic. Built in 1905
You can zoom into the picture (right click on Mozilla)


House in Zakopane, near the Tatra Mountains of Southern Poland



Un-referenced/Un-sourced and undated picture from Steampunk Tendencies at Twitter. Another new build.


Entrance to Sullivan Center, Chicago. Est. 1899


 "Forever" vegan restaurant on the ground floor of an Art Nouveau building, Polanco Borough, Mexico City


"Restaurant Cluny" in San Angel Borough, Mexico City
I think I've shown this one before



« Last Edit: September 12, 2020, 04:42:11 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #1133 on: September 12, 2020, 10:55:12 am »

Mmmm. I think that we need a change of pace. That American Southern Plantation style is too insipid for my taste. I'm down to historical photos of Mexico City (though I don't doubt I can still get some great images of private houses). And we keep jumping to Art Deco which is outside the Victorian Era.

My inner faun is pushing me to re-visit Art Nouveau...

Let's start with these house hidden in the mountains of Central Europe.

I imagine a newwly built Art Nouveau Cottage in Hrensko, in the Czech Republic. Built in 1905
You can zoom into the picture (right click on Mozilla)


House in Zakopane, near the Tatra Mountains of Southern Poland



Un-referenced/Un-sourced and undated picture from Steampunk Tendencies at Twitter. Another new build.


Entrance to Sullivan Center, Chicago. Est. 1899


 "Forever" vegan restaurant on the ground floor of an Art Nouveau building, Polanco Borough, Mexico City


"Restaurant Cluny" in San Angel Borough, Mexico City
I think I've shown this one before




I must confess, I DO like the look of an eyebrow dormer.
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« Reply #1134 on: September 12, 2020, 03:25:46 pm »

House in Zakopane, near the Tatra Mountains of Southern Poland


It looks like they're living in a mushroom. I like it.
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« Reply #1135 on: September 12, 2020, 04:02:15 pm »

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« Reply #1136 on: September 13, 2020, 02:02:02 am »

Mmmm. I think that we need a change of pace. That American Southern Plantation style is too insipid for my taste. I'm down to historical photos of Mexico City (though I don't doubt I can still get some great images of private houses). And we keep jumping to Art Deco which is outside the Victorian Era.

I do like these - very organic! I like the one above, also, although way too many steps for me!
However, my inner architect (who is not a faun!) is forever drawn to Art Deco!!
« Last Edit: September 13, 2020, 02:04:01 am by Banfili » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1137 on: September 13, 2020, 05:15:21 am »

At some point Art Nouveau and Rococo (a late extreme version of Baroque) merge into one another. It's difficult to tell where one begins and where the other ends.

House on West Wrightwood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.
Built in 1896 for Francis J. Dewes.

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« Reply #1138 on: September 13, 2020, 05:40:07 am »

In other contemporary houses, the Art Nouveau style is more defined

The "Huize Zonnebloem" (Sunflower House) in the Zurenborg district of Antwerp, Belgium.
Built in 1900 by architect Jules Hofman.

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« Reply #1139 on: September 13, 2020, 08:50:38 pm »

Most art nouveau architecture makes me a little nauseous. It looks as if someone has vomitted the architectural style over the roof of the building and it has somehow dribbled into place.

I spent the day celebrating my daughter's nineteenth in the Norwich Assembly Rooms, 1750 or thereabouts, not steampunk and quite austere on the outside but brightly decorated and beautiful on the interior, typically Georgian.





That austere exterior style shows the Germanic roots that still runs deep in the English and British veins, whilst the flamboyant interior gives away the French blood that has imbued the Germanic character with a little tiny bit of Southern passion, not too much mind, just the right amount for pleasure but no more. A good combination that makes us English. None of that nooveau chateau chunder.


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« Reply #1140 on: September 13, 2020, 11:05:12 pm »


I spent the day celebrating my daughter's nineteenth in the Norwich Assembly Rooms, 1750 or thereabouts, not steampunk and quite austere on the outside but brightly decorated and beautiful on the interior, typically Georgian.











Congratulations on your daughter's birthday!

Quote
Most art nouveau architecture makes me a little nauseous. It looks as if someone has vomitted the architectural style over the roof of the building and it has somehow dribbled into place.

SNIP

That austere exterior style shows the Germanic roots that still runs deep in the English and British veins, whilst the flamboyant interior gives away the French blood that has imbued the Germanic character with a little tiny bit of Southern passion, not too much mind, just the right amount for pleasure but no more. A good combination that makes us English. None of that nooveau chateau chunder.


However, on the style...

[trading barbs]
Your loss. The Georgian exterior is a bit too "plain toast" for my taste and outside the period. Georgian is the bread and butter for American Colonial in the Noreast (for obvious reasons). Might as well place a US Post Office logo and some letterboxes outside  Roll Eyes
[/trading barbs]

Hyattsville Post Office, Prince George's County, Maryland.


Old Post Office building, Brockton, Massachusetts


The places, however could be made a bit more Steampunk with a few discrete changes (sorry, I couldn't resist, I was searching for Post Offices and this cropped up. I had to post it  Grin)

Men In Black (MIB) Aliens work in the PostOffice


Alright, I'll stop here. I'll behave now.  Grin It's just that you can't really mess with me when I'm in faun mode.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2020, 12:50:26 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1141 on: September 14, 2020, 12:53:56 am »

Yes, but this Georgian is really Georgian as it came from the actual period, those picture above in the US I would guess are Georgian Style but generally being built much, much later, Victorian-plus, mock Georgian as it were.

I agree that that style is functional and a little overdone in America. Lacking their own styles they had no choice but to adopt those given to her by her forefathers from Europe. In the Victorian period Gothic rather won the battle for many government buildings in the UK, whilst in the US, the Georgian classic proportions seems to have appealed to the colonial mind looking to cement their power in architecture. I acknowledge that there is also plenty of genuine Georgian architecture dating from the same period in the US though it may be hard to tell the difference between it and the later creations.

Georgian here is seen as being solid and respectable and one step above wattle and daub that was prevalent in town houses prior to the early 1700s. If I lived in a Georgian house in the UK or America I could feel very at home, they are real homes and solid.

I could never feel at home in one of those Art Nouveau creations. Too fussy and I normally love fuss.
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« Reply #1142 on: September 14, 2020, 06:14:07 am »

Technically, the United States could have had 16th century Post-Tudor architecture as a template, with the very first colonies founded in the first half of the 17th century (1607 for the failed colony of Jamestown, Virginia and Plymouth, Massachusetts established in 1620) . But the colonies were simply not well developed to support that kind of architecture. Consequently, the bulk of progress fell into the 18th century.

"Lacking their own styles"? I'd say they didn't lack styles because these were exclusively Europeans. And remained so by overpowering the existing cultures as the country expanded in the 18th and 19th century. For the 18th century colonists, Georgian was their *only choice * of architecture as brought by the dominant British group among Dutch, Flemish, Germans and Scandinavians who made up the colonies. Later, toward the  turn of the 18th century and into the 19th century, the American nation copied the Renaissance Revival style, also from Great Britain, and with much inspiration from the architectural orders of ancient Greece and Rome, since that was a symbol of the Republic.

Or let me put it in another way. They were not going to adapt Native American culture building practices. Native Americans or African slaves' ancestral architecture did not carry any weight in American society whatsoever. And the closest examples of "brick and stone" architecture could only  be found in ancient Puebloan /Anasazi settlements in what is now Arizona /New Mexico/Utah and Colorado, a territory that was at the time not even known, (except through accounts by Lewis and Clark) and much less envisioned as a  possibility for settlement by newly independent Americans.

Once the United States expanded that far into the continent, after war with Mexico (1846-48), a few styles like the California Mission style and the New Mexico Adobe styles were "incorporated" but only at a very limited local level, that didn't become popular until the start of the 20th century. Like the Native before them, the small pockets of Spanish or Mexican culture in the Southwest territory were obscured in their entirety by the migrants who took the territory. There are however, local examples of German culture in Texas, but not with any level of architecture matching Central Europe. By the 1850s there are some "painted" wooden churches, for example that emulated the stone ceilings of German cathedrals in Europe, but the exterior of the building is typical "American Prairie." And don't forget the New Orleans French architecture, that's probably as "ethnic" as you can get.

So no. There was never any choice for Americans. That's why most of the interesting, truly-American architecture is basically 20th century architecture (eg Frank Lloyd Wright).

The Novo-Spaniards after the Conquest, on the other hand, could adopt native building practices, and in a sense, they did precisely that, with the locally available volcanic and sedimentary rock, and at first slave native labour, but it was done in European fashion, copying the Renaissance and later Baroque architectural styles. At the beginning on the 16th century, they often used the very same stones that were quarried and carved by the native to build their pyramids, and they trained the natives in the European stone carving style. The rest, you can see today, as was carried on by a population who melded Spanish and Native roots.
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