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Author Topic: Steamy Steampunk Buildings  (Read 110469 times)
chironex
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« Reply #1100 on: July 05, 2020, 06:05:50 am »


London Court, Perth, WA.

Other end. The inside is also heavily decorated in the style.

Ballarat, VIC

Vailima Flats, Brisbane, QLD.
https://www.federation-house.com/tudor-revival-in-australia

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« Reply #1101 on: July 05, 2020, 09:56:18 pm »


London Court, Perth, WA.

Other end. The inside is also heavily decorated in the style.

Ballarat, VIC

Vailima Flats, Brisbane, QLD.
https://www.federation-house.com/tudor-revival-in-australia



The first two examples date to the 20s-30s, yes? They look considerably better than the Vailima Flats building, which is more along the lines you see on American apartment buildings from the 70s. Too many examples to show, and I'm not in the mood to post barfy 70s mass produced architecture. I'm not entirely sure why Tudor became fashionable in the 70s, but now that I think about it, it's true, I remember flashes of images from childhood when we used to vacation every summer in the US.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tudor_Revival_architecture
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Court


Eastlake Golf Club clubhouse built in 1923, Atlanta, Georgia.


The Bakken Museum in Minneapolis, Minnesota was built in 1928—30
It looks an awful lot like American middle-high end homes in the 1970s


Flats buildings in the "Faux Two-Door"  Grin style are everywhere in the US (literally), even in areas with warm climate. I also recall that certain products to go along with the style were commonplace back then. Mass produced coloured brick, often with stamped texture was available everywhere, and mock diamond patterned stained glass window assemblies could be found at hardware stores. It never dawned on me that it was a Mock Tudor trend (I was less than 10 yrs old, why would I know?  Cheesy). It was rare to see modern architecture for homes in the United States. You would see it on Architectural Digest Magazine, for a handful of homes around the US. But truly modern upper end houses, could only be seen (to me) in Mexico or on TV shows like "The Brady Bunch." Instead, more "traditional" styles were in, and Tudor was one of them.

In the American South, a competing style was the Faux Victorian / Southern Neoclassical "Gone with the Wind /Civil War" style, and by that, I mean Greco-Roman quasi - Georgian architecture, all with gray bricks and white timber siding and fluted columns; as late as the mid - 20th century it incorporated Civil War imagery like a Confederate flag and a bust of General Lee somewhere in the garden, a very controversial topic today. As a kid I saw the architecture in San Antonio and really never understood its meaning, nor the gravity of the symbols; my goal was to spend a few days at the mall with my grandparents, eating at Luby's cafeteria and shopping for toys I could not get in Mexico, and then go on our annual trek around the American Southwest in our RV...  Roll Eyes. Aah, those were the days.... Ignorance is bliss. Everything looked positive back then, but obviously I was missing information.

Barrington Hall, built in 1839 is a typical antebellum plantation house, Roswell, Georgia.
The style influenced 20th century US Southern architecture well into the 1970s

Maybe I should investigate that American Southern Neo-Classic style. I'm not really fond of it, as I find it *very* drab, but as long as we're talking about revival currents, it is relevant in the sense that it's tied to a legitimate Victorian Era period.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2020, 12:10:31 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #1102 on: July 07, 2020, 05:51:52 am »

Looking at Barrington Hall, when it is raining or really sunny, does the roof actually shelter anyone on the verandah/porch?

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chironex
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« Reply #1103 on: July 07, 2020, 08:07:45 am »

If the weather is coming in from the other side of the house, or directly overhead.
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« Reply #1104 on: July 07, 2020, 08:25:03 am »

I think. The main thing is that it does not allow sunlight to heat the walls of the house.
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« Reply #1105 on: July 07, 2020, 09:11:47 am »

Looking at Barrington Hall, when it is raining or really sunny, does the roof actually shelter anyone on the verandah/porch?

Sorontar

If the weather is coming in from the other side of the house, or directly overhead.

I think. The main thing is that it does not allow sunlight to heat the walls of the house.

As Morozow wrote, there is value in the shade over the walls. The attic under the roof as an empty (or storage) space does provide insulation (remember this is a hot and humid weather region) and there is always one side shielded, though I doubt it covers much in torrential rain.

However, I think it's value is mostly symbolic. Wealthy southern plantation owners tended to be of British descent and they tried to emulate the great manors of the old world, even though the American South is as far as you can get from the UK in so many ways, particularly weather-wise. Also Greco-Roman iconography and imagery are an important symbol of the American Republic.

Hillcrest Baptist Church in Austin called my attention some time ago, because it's style is so "Southern." This is an example of Antebellum Revival, which is a derivative of Neo-Classic. This is a contemporary building, but you can see the similarity. Do you really need that type of an entry at a church?



The plantations may be gone, but the symbols are still there.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2020, 08:44:51 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
chironex
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« Reply #1106 on: July 07, 2020, 10:53:41 am »

The architecture of power does change, after all.

What it never manages to do, is to hide.
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« Reply #1107 on: July 07, 2020, 03:47:05 pm »

The architecture of power does change, after all.

What it never manages to do, is to hide.

I feel it tends to ebb and flood, like the tide, or perhaps like a visiting ghost, actually, so people can just pick it up again at a later time.

I should also point out that the American Antebellum architecture does not follow British Neoclassical in that the materials may be different. Without a tradition of masonry skills and with a preponderance for light timber structures, the Americans in the Deep South substituted stone columns for wood. Plantation owners were still not wealthy enough to build in those materials, or they were simply not available in the 19th century. Consequently, stone was adopted later in the the Reconstruction Era (after the US Civil War) with more traditional building materials.

I've posted this picture a million times, it seems; this is the Littlefield House built by a wealthy Confederate officer after the war. The Antebellum style gave way to a more cosmopolitan Victorian style, though I don't see any Art Nouveau examples in Austin, that was skipped altogether. Wood gave way to local limestone of various colours, the red limestone below being the strongest colour available (now extinct). Verandas were transformed with New Orleans-styled iron railing. Houses in the Austin area, for example tended to look like this in the last decades of the 19th century, and there's a number of surviving examples peppered around Austin and neighboring Georgetown.

The Littlefield House outside of the University of Texas at Austin
Definitely not in the Southern Antebellum style, but a more cosmopolitan style.
Built in 1893 for Confederate Major George Littlefield, a benefactor of the university

Over the years, from the start of and increasing through the mid 20th century, and perhaps because of nostalgia and alienation against the North, the Antebellum architecture was brought back as a type of Southern identity symbol. I remember the Revival Antebellum trend lasting well into the 1970s.


Sorry for the grainy picture below. This is a postcard from 1980. Imagery from the 1970s is often very hard to find. The picture in question is a postcard from Albert Pick Motel in San Antonio, Texas. I spent many times at that hotel during our annual summer vacations to the Southwest of the US. Albert Pick actually is not a southern company, it actually started as a hotel servicing company in Chicago in 1857, and it's got a very interesting history which I may post later here.

The thing about this hotel is that the lobby was located in a separate building from the rooms. The "Motor Hotel" is an American concept for a hotel with rooms accesible from the road as opposed to a closed in tower. It's a Diesel Era concept that became popular in the Atomic Age, basically. The "Club House" if you want to call it that, featured the hotel lobby and reception, plus amenities such as taxi call office, car rental office and tourist information, and an early game arcade, but the two storey building was in the form of a Southern Plantation building, and the garden between the lobby and the pool featured several Confederate Era monuments that disappeared over time.

Post cards from Albert Pick Motel, San Antonio, Texas, ca 1980.
The lobby of the hotel (background) was an Antebellum Southern Plantation style building
Probably not built much earlier than the mid 1960s, it did not survive much past the mid 80s.



« Last Edit: July 07, 2020, 07:48:50 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #1108 on: July 11, 2020, 09:29:42 am »

Reforma Avenue seen from Monument to Columbus.
Imperial Hotel to the right, 1920s, Mexico City.

« Last Edit: July 11, 2020, 09:32:12 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #1109 on: July 13, 2020, 12:05:18 pm »

The video may be in Spanish, but you will hardly need a translation. It's a documentary using original film from pre-civil war Mexico. The period 1905—1905, during the "Porfiriato" period, when President Porfirio Diaz had favored European migration and the introduction of technology into the country. This is the direct equivalent of the Meïji Period in Japan when the fashion was Continental European, and anything European was adopted by the government and the well heeled. The success of the industrial revolution coupled with the racial and class disparity in the population triggered the Mexican Civil War in 1910.

"La vida en México en el Siglo XX" - 2.- Los sueños perdidos (1905-1909)
« Last Edit: July 13, 2020, 06:39:49 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #1110 on: July 13, 2020, 06:11:56 pm »

More interesting videos. The history of the 19th century immigrant settlements in Mexico City. What is known today as "Colonia Juárez" prior to 1906 was called "Colonia Americana" (American Colony), because of the large congregation of American citizens who settled in that location. In the video they show some stills from period photos.

This is a video from a Mexican news TV program, ADN 40, who also maintain a historical chronicle. I found it on Twitter I don't know how to embed it directly without downloading it and breaking copyright law,
So I'll just drop the link here and give you some stills as well.
https://twitter.com/adn40/status/1282444247644409857?s=09





Note the top of the building in the background - the "citadel style" was favored by the Americans.


You can also see castle-like towers. The Americans had a certain style in their homes which differed from anyone else.


That ugly "castle" or "citadel" style that we saw above for the American embassy in 1913 was actually common among Americans! Each immigrant group brought their own architecture, and if they were wealthy, they'd just build a large house in that style. All of these people were well to do by the standards of the Era, and in fact, Mexico City at time had areas with some of the highest rental rates anywhere. In contrast, Central Europeans built in their own style. Not necessarily identical to their place of origin, but some details from Germany or Czech would be recognizable, as well as French style buildings. Most of those buildings were lost in time.

Europeans brought a different "continental" style, in some cases identifiable as French or German.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2020, 06:39:07 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1111 on: July 19, 2020, 08:56:37 am »

After the Revolución, the name of assassinated President Francisco I Madero was plastered all over country, same as another President, Venustiano Carranza. This picture is the corner of [President] Madero Street with [Friar] Motlínia Street during the 1920s.

Jewelry shop and photography businesses among others.
Corner of Madero and Motolínia Streets, Mexico City, 1920s
Note the Art Nouveau style awning, far left, and the sign that reads "Kodak's."
You can zoom into the picture

"Casa Borda" an 18th century building on the corner of Madero and Bolívar streets, photographed in the early 20th century. It's unclear if this photo preceeded the naming of Madero Street, probably it does, though in the 1920s you could still see carriages on the street and many Victorian business facades were still standing.  Shows the "Great Red Room" (El Gran Salón Rojo), the first cinema in Mexico. Note the American physician's and dentist's signs on the building. "Dr. A J Coats, Physician. Surgeon," "Dr. D M Fagg, American Dentist."

Early 20th century, undated. Cinema and medical offices.
Corner of what would later be called Madero and Bolívar Streets. Mexico City.
You can zoom into the picture

The National Medical Institute, Mexico City, was inaugurated in July 1890, and is still standing today, but semi-abandoned at the moment. At some point in time it was turned into an agricultural administration building.








« Last Edit: July 19, 2020, 09:55:21 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1112 on: July 20, 2020, 11:49:13 am »

All that grafitti shows that people in your location really don't care about their built environment. I have never seen a quality building abused that way so systematically without anyone taking any remedial action.
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« Reply #1113 on: July 20, 2020, 03:39:40 pm »

All that grafitti shows that people in your location really don't care about their built environment. I have never seen a quality building abused that way so systematically without anyone taking any remedial action.

You haven't been to Detroit. Or Los Angeles. Or pretty much any major American city. There is a scumbag culture of people who think it's their right to paint on buildings.
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« Reply #1114 on: July 21, 2020, 01:38:26 am »

All that grafitti shows that people in your location really don't care about their built environment. I have never seen a quality building abused that way so systematically without anyone taking any remedial action.

Things are much worse since the new federal administration took over. I don't want to get into politics, but you can DM me if you're curious. Mexico's attention grabbing growth and European /Asian migration in the last 2 decades (stereotypes of drug cartels and migration nonwithstanding) stopped cold-turkey one whole year before Covid-19 because of political ideology. Example:  the government is proposing limiting the rights of renters, favouring squatters. Unneeded "austerity" measures have taken up to 75% off from the archeological and preservation efforts (not related to COVID). The next 4 years will see both prehispanic and colonial buildings crumble and potentially modern private property and private industry expropriation. Never mind the 100s of thousands of deaths happening this year. Mexico is in its fight for life right now.
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« Reply #1115 on: July 25, 2020, 09:34:44 am »

Mexico's House of Deputees (directly equivalent to House of Representatives in the US or similar to the House of Commons in the UK) in the 1940s. Today it houses the capital city's congress.


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« Reply #1116 on: August 04, 2020, 05:19:51 am »

The Houses of Hugo and Clara Scherer; Wealthy German Migrants in Mexico.

Herr Scherer was said to be of Alsatian origin , but little is certain because there are at least contemporary immigrants with the name Scherer, one of them being a Jewish family. What is known about him is that he was a German industrialist associated with the mining industry. Most of the information obtained comes from  Maria-Lourdes Farnés Scherer (grand-daughter of Hugo Scherer Sr. y niece of Hugo Scherer Jr.) and the information is complemented information written on The industrialization of Mexico, 1890-1940, by Stephen H. Haber.

Hugo Scherer, German industrialist and diplomat in Mexico - undated


Hugo Scherer probably arrived around 1867, just after the French Intervention in Mexico with a wave of German migrants. In 1888, he married a woman by the name of Clara Scherer-Pino a Mexican-German herself who has the same last name, and is thought to be related to him somehow (leading to the Scherer-Scherer compound surname for their 4 children in Spanish nomenclature). In the photo below Clara Scherer and Hugo are seen at a meeting at the German Club in Mexico City

Clara Scherer (1st one standing at left), at the German Club in Mexico City - undated


Mr. Scherer was a member of the board of directors at the Santa María de la Paz Mining Co. and "Minas de Fierro del Pacífico" as well as director of the “Mexican Mining and industrial Company”  but also became a liaison for Persian Consulate in Mexico. Additionally he was a founding member of board at  the national bank, "Banco de Mexico." He went on to found at least three other financial institutions. So needles to say these were very well-heeled people, which explains the size of the houses you will see below.

First Scherer Mansion on famed Reforma Avenue, Mexico City


Hugo Scherer only lived for 3 years in the Reforma Avenue House, which at the time was sufficiently central for him to tend to his business and consular duties. But as time went by, he veered away from mining and diplomacy and entered the manufacturing industry with his son, first founding a cotton textile company, a cigar making company and a dynamite manufacturing company. At that point Hugo and Clara moved to a second mansion, shown below

The second Scherer mansion circa 1891 in what is now Sadi Carnot Street in Mexico City

By 1891, Hugo and Clara lived in a second opulent mansion, but apparently that was not enough and having money to spend , they built a "chalet /country home" in the then-far away town of Mixcoac (now fully engulfed by Mexico City), which was done in an "Old-World Style" reflecting their German roots.

The Scherer's "Chalet Country Home" in Mixcoac, Mexico City

Which is not to say that the forst mansion of Reforma Avenue was abandoned. Quite the contrary, there are architectural record with plans that show remodeling proposals for the old Reforma Avenue house, like this one from 1907, drawn by architect Manuel Cortina-Garcia. The project would be awarded to Civil Engineer Salvador Echegaray, for his 1906 proposal, and because he has experience in building houses at that location as well as munuments in just outside the house on a Reforma intersectiion, like the Christopher Columbus Statue.

Rejected remodeling proposal for the old Reforma Ave. House, in 1907

An interior shot of the remodeled Scherer House on Reforma


Winter shot of the Statue ot Christopher Columbus on a Reforma avanue intersection (foreground). The old Scherer House in the background

Hugo Scherer Sr. died while on a trip to Germany in 1909. Before his death Hugo Sr. had planned to receive a German delegation for the 100th anniversary (centennial) of the Mexican Independence. Later, his son, Hugo Scherer-Pino (aka Hugo Scherer Jr.) having built three business ventures with his fatherm built a more "modest" mansion, also on the famed Reforma Avenue... The Sherer Jr. house instead was used to receive the German delegation in the Mexican Centenary Celebrations of September 1910.

The Hugo Scherer Jr. House on Reforma Avenue. Photo ca. 1926.


But 1910 was also the start of the Mexican Civil War (aka Revolucion of 1910), and in 1913, when President Madero was deposed and assasinated by Victoriano Huerta (I talked about this in other posts above), Allied troops entered Mexico City. The old Scherer House on Reforma avenue was heavily damaged by artillery fire.

The old Scherer house was damaged when troops entered Mexico City in 1913.


« Last Edit: August 04, 2020, 05:51:51 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1117 on: August 19, 2020, 03:45:25 am »

México city in the 1920s
Así era la Ciudad de México en los años 20

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Dave Leppo
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« Reply #1118 on: August 30, 2020, 02:00:31 pm »

Stack Rock Fort, Wales - Look it up, the interior is way cool.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2020, 12:13:57 pm by Dave Leppo » Logged
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« Reply #1119 on: August 30, 2020, 03:04:39 pm »

Stack Rock Fort, Wales - Look it up, the interior is way cool.

If you have a spare 9M you can get 3 on the south coast of UK.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-england-hampshire-53838761
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« Reply #1120 on: August 30, 2020, 11:39:48 pm »

Stack Rock Fort, Wales - Look it up, the interior is way cool.


Broken link to image?
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chironex
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« Reply #1121 on: September 07, 2020, 01:14:25 pm »
























Recent images from Cairns, Gordonvale, and Townsville.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #1122 on: September 07, 2020, 04:21:17 pm »


It reminds me of the old Michigan State Police posts:

This same identical building can be found along the old highways all over Michigan.
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« Reply #1123 on: September 07, 2020, 08:01:21 pm »

Strange, but most of those look decidely modern to my eyes.
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« Reply #1124 on: September 07, 2020, 09:35:38 pm »

Strange, but most of those look decidely modern to my eyes.

We'd have to go over them one by one.

Some of the structures look Victorian like the Cairns Post building, a few others look like late 19th or early 20th century buildings that have been "plastered over,," so it's very difficult to tell the age of the buildings. The first two at the top are just "new" modern buildings stylised in a "conservative" architecture (I call it "Walgreen's Architecture" after the pharmacy chain in the US). I can see another few as original Art Déco, like the Jack & Newell building and the "Chambers" building. And 3 of them could have been Victorian but were built in the Art Déco era (Barrier Reef hotel was built in 1926  according to Google).

I'm going to hazard a guess and say most of the area was built in the Art Déco Era, with the Post Office being the oldest structure..
« Last Edit: September 07, 2020, 10:01:44 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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