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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 191616 times)
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #925 on: February 19, 2016, 04:58:33 pm »

You need a bit more roughage in your diet, lots of beer, sweets and coffee so far.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #926 on: February 19, 2016, 07:00:31 pm »

You need a bit more roughage in your diet, lots of beer, sweets and coffee so far.

But wouldn't most ruffage fall out of the canned food area prior to 1900? I suspect it would go into the Voctorian Vittles thread (market goods)...

I don't know about Europe, but in the US, At the end of the 19th C, vegetables were still regarded to be the food of the peasants. Italian migrants were responsible for introducing vegetables into the American diet. That's why we call them zucchini instead of courgettes, and tomatoes came with Italian migrants instead of Mexican migrants (which shows you how culturally divided Mexico and the US were in the 19th C that not even Native Mexican produce, both courgettes and tomatoes, would be passed into the US).
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #927 on: February 19, 2016, 07:08:47 pm »

Tomatoes came from America to Italy a little earlier than that.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #928 on: February 20, 2016, 12:21:43 am »

Tomatoes came from America to Italy a little earlier than that.

Which makes it even more noteworthy.  Often the introduction of American (continental) crops into Europe would be delayed for centuries,  and suddenly something like starvation would force people to adopt the crop rather quickly. Then something else would happen,  a blight or something else,  and these people would migrate to the Americas.  Example:the Irish and potatoes.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #929 on: February 20, 2016, 12:22:14 am »

You need a bit more roughage in your diet, lots of beer, sweets and coffee so far.

Shredded Wheat has gotten more than its share of coverage. There's your roughage.

And now back to the beer, sweets, and coffee.
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Prof. Cecily
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« Reply #930 on: February 20, 2016, 08:55:24 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
Tomatoes came from America to Italy a little earlier than that.

Which makes it even more noteworthy.  Often the introduction of American (continental) crops into Europe would be delayed for centuries,  and suddenly something like starvation would force people to adopt the crop rather quickly. Then something else would happen,  a blight or something else,  and these people would migrate to the Americas.  Example:the Irish and potatoes.
Now that's something to think about in this afternoon's rehearsal while the director is favouring us with his distilled wisdom during rehearsal time.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #931 on: February 27, 2016, 05:17:11 am »

Today I found another brand for the list, whose origin overlaps with the very end of the Victorian Period... The brand will enter simultaneously the European and American lists. I ignore if if it entered the UK at the same time, but I'm having a hard time imagining that it wouldn't, so tentatively enters the UK list as well.

You see, I was indulging by eating some smoked oysters over Guacamole-Jalapeño flavoured corn chips (really delicious), when it struck me that King Oscar (as it's known in the USA), was a legitimate Victorian-Era canned seafood brand.

The namesake of the brand, refers to King Oscar II (1829-1907), ruler of Sweden and Norway, before Norway was granted independence in 1905. In 1902 King Oscar Fredrik gave the canning company, Chr. Bjelland & Co. of Norway, special royal permission to use his name and likeness on a line of sardine products. Almost immediately after that, by 1903, the brand was being imported into the United States. The brand was acquired by several different parent companies as the sardine canning industry evolved in Norway. Today, King Oscar AS is owned by Thai Union Group, one of the largest seafood producers in the world.

King Oscar canned sardines and seafood (Brand founded in 1902 by cannery Chr. Bjelland & Co. in Norway, under special permission from King Oscar II, ruler of Sweden and Norway until 1905)
(Edit: Already updated in the list on the previous page)

http://www.kingoscar.com





1880 Norwegian fish canneries begin exporting sardines.
1893 Norwegian smoked sardines are introduced to the United States at the World Exhibition in Chicago. Additionally, other world markets are explored.
1902 King Oscar II of Norway and Sweden grants the Chr. Bjelland & Co. special royal permission to use his name and portrait on a brand of Norwegian sardines.
1903 The Chr. Bjelland & Co. begins exporting the King Oscar brand of sardines to the United States.
1920 The brand becomes well established in U.S. and British markets.[citation needed]
1950 Various King Oscar brisling sardine products are accorded kosher certification.
1965 King Oscar is introduced to Japan, where it is now the #1 imported sardine brand.
1981 Eleven Norwegian canneries merge to form a single company, Norway Foods, which acquires the King Oscar brand.
1996 Norway Foods is acquired by Rieber & Søn ASA, a Norwegian-based, specialized food company.
1998 The King Oscar brand is reintroduced to the Norwegian market and is introduced to Poland.
1999 The King Oscar brand is introduced to the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Romania.
2001 The King Oscar brand is introduced to Slovakia. Also, King Oscar is officially relaunched in Russia, where the brand was initially registered at the turn of the 20th century.
2002 The King Oscar brand celebrates its centennial.
2008 While King Oscar fish catches are still made in various waters throughout the world, King Oscar’s central production efforts are moved to a facility in Gniewino, Poland. Additionally, the company continues to maintain a production facility in Svolvær, Norway.
2009 King Oscar AS becomes the new owner of the old brand.
2010 King Oscar AS purchased by Procuritas Capital Investments.
2014 King Oscar AS purchased by Thai Union Group.

~ ~ ~
« Last Edit: February 27, 2016, 05:41:14 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Mercury Wells
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« Reply #932 on: March 19, 2016, 07:44:15 pm »

New one for the UK list

Hollands Pies 1851? (but I would date the company from 1869 really)
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #933 on: March 19, 2016, 08:14:36 pm »

Very good find.
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #934 on: March 30, 2016, 11:18:25 pm »

Geo. Hall & Sons (soft drinks 1849) Allowed?
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #935 on: March 30, 2016, 11:25:15 pm »

I reckon so.
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #936 on: April 20, 2016, 06:23:05 pm »

Fyffes Bananas 1888
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #937 on: April 20, 2016, 06:28:10 pm »

Thanks - we have Fffffffffyfes!
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Caledonian
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« Reply #938 on: April 21, 2016, 11:43:04 am »

speaking of bananas
Chiquita since 1870
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #939 on: April 21, 2016, 11:51:45 am »

Chiquita bananas on whose list? They don't sound Dutch.
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Caledonian
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« Reply #940 on: April 21, 2016, 11:54:49 am »

Chiquita bananas on whose list? They don't sound Dutch.

while they're immensely popular over here, it's an american company.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #941 on: April 21, 2016, 12:17:12 pm »

Well, it can on both lists then, US and Dutch.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #942 on: April 21, 2016, 09:43:40 pm »

Well, it can on both lists then, US and Dutch.

Only if they were available in the Netherlands or Europe as an import from America in the designated Victorian perio, like Tequila Sauza, for example.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #943 on: April 21, 2016, 09:57:59 pm »

Correct!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #944 on: April 25, 2016, 12:53:20 am »

Chiquita Banana has an interesting history.  If I remember correctly, a rather nefarious one,  vis a vis political intervention in small countries in Central America during a more expansionist period of American politics. This is probably the origin of the moniker "Banana Republic."  

I'm going to slowly read it and see if it has not been included in the list.  

The thing is that Chiquita is a trademark which appeared after WWII (1947), well after the Victorian period.  I could circumvent that obstacle by stating that the product (produce)  is identical to the Victorian version,  and continuously sold by the same genealogical branch of Boston Fruit Company (1878) and United Fruit Company (1899), which leads to the current ChiquitaFyffes merger (a blatant tax evading loophole,  if I may say so).

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiquita_Brands_International
« Last Edit: April 25, 2016, 12:57:00 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
mephit
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« Reply #945 on: April 26, 2016, 03:14:24 am »

I could circumvent that obstacle by stating that the product (produce)  is identical to the Victorian version

Interestingly, this would likely be false. Because bananas have been bred not to have seeds anymore, all bananas produced world-wide are functionally genetic clones of each other. The current strain of food banana (Cavendish) did not become the standard type until the 1950s. Before that point, a strain called Gros Michel was dominant. A fungal infection called Panama Disease began attacking and killing Gros Michel bananas starting in the 1940s and quickly decimated the world banana crops. Cavendish bananas (which are a Victorian creation but which weren't particularly popular) began being sold in large numbers as replacements for the earlier strain. It's said the flavor of Gros Michels is much better than the Cavendishes, but the fungus still kills Gros Michels quite effectively and so they're still fairly rare.

All this is to say that the bananas sold by the Boston Fruit Company and it's decedants were almost certainly Gros Michels until the 1950s or '60s, so even the product has changed.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #946 on: April 26, 2016, 09:12:32 am »

Yes! We Have No Bananas [1930] Screen Songs Cartoon
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RJBowman
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« Reply #947 on: May 15, 2016, 02:38:41 am »

Has this been included in the list?:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Underwood_Company
Underwood Deviled Ham, first sold in 1868 with the trademarked devil mascot first appearing in 1895. I like it on Brownberry Original Recipe Natural Wheat Bread.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #948 on: May 15, 2016, 02:53:58 am »

Don't think so - would like to try it.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #949 on: May 15, 2016, 05:50:48 am »

I could circumvent that obstacle by stating that the product (produce)  is identical to the Victorian version


Interestingly, this would likely be false. Because bananas have been bred not to have seeds anymore, all bananas produced world-wide are functionally genetic clones of each other. The current strain of food banana (Cavendish) did not become the standard type until the 1950s. Before that point, a strain called Gros Michel was dominant. A fungal infection called Panama Disease began attacking and killing Gros Michel bananas starting in the 1940s and quickly decimated the world banana crops. Cavendish bananas (which are a Victorian creation but which weren't particularly popular) began being sold in large numbers as replacements for the earlier strain. It's said the flavor of Gros Michels is much better than the Cavendishes, but the fungus still kills Gros Michels quite effectively and so they're still fairly rare.

All this is to say that the bananas sold by the Boston Fruit Company and it's decedants were almost certainly Gros Michels until the 1950s or '60s, so even the product has changed.


An incredibly interesting argument (no really!). But do we want to go that far?  Are Cavendish bananas not bananas? Are the Cavendish artificial genetically engineered versions of bananas? See my point?  I'm sure 100% accuracy can't apply here, as Coca Cola does not use the original formula, nor does it use sugar any more in many countries. It would be the equivalent of stating that Hunt's tomatoes should not be included, because the particular strain of tomatoes sold back then is not the same as the one used today. Or that cocoa beans used by Hersheys today are not the same.  Such an argument is far too restrictive

As the curator of the list, I have to make a judgment. And the issue on the particular cultivar of bananas sold back in the 19th. C. is not a sufficiently convincing argument to remove the brand from the list.

Chiquita Banana The Original Commercial

« Last Edit: May 15, 2016, 05:52:43 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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