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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 191683 times)
Fairley B. Strange
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« Reply #850 on: October 28, 2015, 03:54:47 pm »

J.W., try the Tim-Tams.
As an Australian, I always tended to take them for granted amongst our local array of biscuitry, but having seen their effects upon Coalition military forces in Afghanistan, they are equated somewhere close behind a half-kilo bag of uncut crack-cocaine in the international barter market.
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« Reply #851 on: October 28, 2015, 08:21:50 pm »

jacobs cream crackers 1885 on the list.

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« Reply #852 on: October 28, 2015, 08:25:34 pm »

Timtams look like Penguin Bar copies to me and Penguins have only been around since 1932 in the UK. So no Timtams on the list please.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #853 on: October 29, 2015, 02:04:58 am »

Timtams look like Penguin Bar copies to me and Penguins have only been around since 1932 in the UK. So no Timtams on the list please.

Well, this seems to be a warning shot across the bow of the Australians.

Sadly, Uncle Bert is correct in the origins of the Tim Tam.  Arnott's however is a bona fide Victorian Era brand:

From Wiki
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Tam
Quote
History

A plate of Tim Tams
The biscuit was created by Ian Norris, who was the director of food technology at Arnott's. During 1958, he took a world trip looking for inspiration for new products. While in Britain, he found the Penguin biscuit and decided to "make a better one".[1]

Tim Tams went on to the market in 1964.[2][3] They were named by Ross Arnott, who attended the 1958 Kentucky Derby and decided that the name of the winning horse, Tim Tam was perfect for a planned new line of biscuits.[4]

Apart from Penguins, products similar to Tim Tams include "Temptins" from Dick Smith Foods, New Zealand's "Chit Chats",[1] Australian Woolworths' home brand product "Triple Choc", the Coles brand "Chocolate Supreme" biscuits, and various similar "home-brand" products marketed by British supermarkets.

In 2003, Arnott's sued Dick Smith Foods over their Temptin' brand of chocolate biscuits, which Arnott's alleged had diluted their trademark as a similar biscuit, in similarly-designed packaging.[5] The case was settled out of court.

The question then becomes: which of Arnott's products make it back to the Victorian Era?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnott%27s_Biscuits_Holdings
« Last Edit: October 29, 2015, 02:09:36 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #854 on: October 29, 2015, 02:12:20 am »

J.W., try the Tim-Tams.
As an Australian, I always tended to take them for granted amongst our local array of biscuitry, but having seen their effects upon Coalition military forces in Afghanistan, they are equated somewhere close behind a half-kilo bag of uncut crack-cocaine in the international barter market.

Actually I have tried the Tim Tams before (about 6 packages  Grin ) thanks to an Australian friend of mine in the US. I know of it's addictive effects.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #855 on: October 29, 2015, 03:25:50 am »

What can you tell me about these?

Speculatius or Speculoos from Holland or Belgium.

The American version is "Windmill" cookies:


Wikipedia says that these cookies have been around since at lease 1870. Is there a bakery that has been making them continuously since that time?

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Crescat Scientia
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« Reply #856 on: October 29, 2015, 04:02:13 am »

What can you tell me about these?

Speculatius or Speculoos from Holland or Belgium.

The American version is "Windmill" cookies:


Wikipedia says that these cookies have been around since at lease 1870. Is there a bakery that has been making them continuously since that time?




Aren't they marvelous?  They look like light switch plates.

Speculoos or speculaas are spiced cookies for Saint Nicholas' Day.

In the Netherlands Verkade is a major brand.  They were founded in 1886 and made good use of the newly invented biscuit tin.  I do not know if their speculaas are that early.  I did an image search for their speculaas biscuit tins and could not be certain any were earlier than about 1910 or so.
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« Reply #857 on: October 29, 2015, 05:14:20 am »

What can you tell me about these?

Speculatius or Speculoos from Holland or Belgium.

The American version is "Windmill" cookies:


Wikipedia says that these cookies have been around since at lease 1870. Is there a bakery that has been making them continuously since that time?




I thought you and I had touched on that already. My local super carries these: Hellema speculaas, which started after the founding of the brand Hellema in 1861 (see page 30 on February of this year).  They're $2 per package and they tend to be fairly fragile in spite of being protected in the package.



https://www.heb.com/product-detail/hellema-speculaas-original-dutch-spiced-cookies/1653184

My local super in the Lone Star State has started importing Dutch Hellema-brand Speculaas (speculoos biscuits), and the company livery on the package claims the company to date back to 1861.  Have we included this in the European list? Does any one have more info?




From Wiki:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speculoos

Quote
Speculoos (Dutch: Speculaas Dutch pronunciation: [speːkyˈlaːs], French: spéculoos, German: Spekulatius) is a type of spiced shortcrust biscuit, traditionally baked for consumption on or just before St Nicholas' feast in the Netherlands (December 5), Belgium (December 6),[1] and around Christmas in the western and southern parts of Germany. Speculoos are thin, very crunchy, slightly browned and, most significantly, have some image or figure (often from the traditional stories about St. Nicholas) stamped on the front side before baking; the back is flat.
Speculoos dough does not rise much. Dutch and Belgian versions are baked with light brown (beet) sugar and baking powder. German Spekulatius uses baker's ammonia as leavening agent. Spices used in speculoos are cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, cardamom and white pepper. Traditionally, speculaas were made from rye and the name speculoos was coined for Belgian wheat flour cookies with hardly any spices. Nowadays most Speculoos versions are made from white (wheat) flour, brown sugar, butter and spices. Some varieties use some almond flour and have slivered almonds embedded in the bottom. Some Belgian varieties use less or no spice.


And yes, the direct equivalent are the windmill cookies from Hillshire Farm. A well known variant of speculoos in Europe are the Biscoff biscuits/cookies

Our local super also started selling store brand "speculoos butter" similar to the Biscoff Spread (we do have Biscoff brand biscuits/cookies as well)
« Last Edit: October 29, 2015, 05:31:18 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #858 on: October 29, 2015, 05:55:28 am »

BelVitas are trying to sell themselves as a health food, thus the avoidance of the word "cookie".

They are, however, cookies, sold in the cookie aisle and not with the granola bars.

The one I tried seemed an okay butter cookie.  The fact that Nabisco is trying to sell them as a breakfast food rubs me the wrong way.

When in doubt I always go with stroopwaffels.


On the other hand, unhealthily sweet/fat pastries for breakfast are a long standing European tradition since the 19th C if not much earlier, as far back as the 13th. C, based on the history of the Proto-Croissant, the Austrian Kipferl...

In another thread I had recounted the history of the French and Austrian influence in 19th. C. cuisine in Mexico. after the French Intervention/Maximilian Empire (1861-67)

French-Mex Food in history:
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,11121.msg899607.html#msg899607

Maximilian (2nd Mexican) Empire (1864-67)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_intervention_in_Mexico
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Mexican_Empire

And in particular, during this period in the 1860s, the introduction of the Austrian Kipferl into Mexico - two decades later known as the French Croissant (circa 1890's), a/k/a the Mexican Cuerno/Cuernito.

As well as various puff pastries such as the French Palmiere a/k/a Mexican Oreja.  

Kipferl/Cuerno/Croissant


Palmiere/Oreja


In Mexico, when paired with fruits, juice and coffee, this is known as the "Continental Breakfast," in this sense the word "Continental" as in Continental Europe, to differentiate it from English and American breakfasts, which tend to have eggs, and cured meats, such as bacon, and in general a greater protein content.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2015, 06:23:01 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #859 on: October 29, 2015, 02:29:53 pm »

What can you tell me about these?

Speculatius or Speculoos from Holland or Belgium.

The American version is "Windmill" cookies:


Wikipedia says that these cookies have been around since at lease 1870. Is there a bakery that has been making them continuously since that time?




Speculoos is actually the Belgian name for those cookies. and a brand name. it's Speculaas and it's absolutely delicious.
they are made in various bakeries, as well as available in basically all stores. it's easy to make at home too, with the right spices.
try them with a bit of butter on white bread! (nice breakfast if you're tired of chocolate sprinkles  Wink )

Speculaasplanken (speculaas boards) that form the mold for the nice shapes of the cookies used to hang around my grandfathers house (he was a baker, and as was his father and his father before him)
the oldest knows board in the netherlands is from the 16th century, but they became common in the 17th and 18th century. the tins are by far more recent, indeed.
in the netherlands Speculaas would have been a pretty special cookie, as boys would give human-shape cookies to the girls they fancied. if she broke the cookie while he was looking, she didn't like him.

and I saw stroopwafels being mentioned.
hand them to me and nobody gets hurt.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2015, 02:56:20 pm by Caledonian » Logged

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« Reply #860 on: December 06, 2015, 04:06:05 am »

Kirk's Castile Soap since 1839.

I know it isn't strictly a foodstuff but I have had mouthfuls of it as a kid when learning what words not to say in public.

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« Reply #861 on: December 06, 2015, 01:52:00 pm »

People have eaten soap but if we follow your lead we will have Duckers shoes (leather) and Prices (Candles) to the mix.

Even though some of the brands might qualify, no to inedibles on the list I am afraid. Please start another thread "Victorian brands still extant (non food)".
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Banfili
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« Reply #862 on: December 06, 2015, 02:14:20 pm »

Iced Vo-Vo's, since 1907!
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« Reply #863 on: December 06, 2015, 02:16:51 pm »

Bolletje cookies and buiscuits since 1892
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« Reply #864 on: December 06, 2015, 03:17:44 pm »

The Iced Vovos  (no greengrocer's apostrophe needed Smiley ) are arguably just outside the era but they should be OK. Added to the British list, Australia as a British Colonial entity having only recently been created (1788) and in 1907 very much part of the Empire - or you could create an Australian list specifically for the Australians - that list might contain a large number of British brands so a lot of duplication.

The Dutch/European list - is it working?

« Last Edit: December 06, 2015, 03:41:38 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
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« Reply #865 on: December 06, 2015, 05:12:39 pm »

The Iced Vovos  (no greengrocer's apostrophe needed Smiley ) are arguably just outside the era but they should be OK. Added to the British list, Australia as a British Colonial entity having only recently been created (1788) and in 1907 very much part of the Empire - or you could create an Australian list specifically for the Australians - that list might contain a large number of British brands so a lot of duplication.

The Dutch/European list - is it working?



Im not entirely sure what you mean by that sentence but Bolletje is one of the largest brands in cookies still. There slogan 'ik wil bolletje' (i want bolletje) is very correct since a lot of people seem to prefer bolletje cookies over the other brands.
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« Reply #866 on: December 06, 2015, 05:48:46 pm »

We had a European list maintained by a Hollander/Dutchman. If it still is being maintained then it could be added to that list. If it isn't being maintained you could pick it up and add it to the list yourself. See previous posts.
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« Reply #867 on: December 06, 2015, 05:53:32 pm »

We had a European list maintained by a Hollander/Dutchman. If it still is being maintained then it could be added to that list. If it isn't being maintained you could pick it up and add it to the list yourself. See previous posts.

aaaah I see.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #868 on: December 07, 2015, 12:40:50 am »

Here's one that doesn't seem to have been listed.:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manischewitz

Manischewitz. If your local grocer in America carries anything kosher at all, he carries Manischewitz.
http://www.manischewitz.com/

Founded in 1888 when Victoria was still healthy and kicking.

They make soup mixes with dry ingredients in a cellophane wrapper. I buy these mixes and mix them with things that would make kosher cooks cringe.
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« Reply #869 on: December 07, 2015, 06:16:35 am »

Here's one that doesn't seem to have been listed.:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manischewitz

Manischewitz. If your local grocer in America carries anything kosher at all, he carries Manischewitz.
http://www.manischewitz.com/

Founded in 1888 when Victoria was still healthy and kicking.

They make soup mixes with dry ingredients in a cellophane wrapper. I buy these mixes and mix them with things that would make kosher cooks cringe.


It was listed already, actually - I'm sure.

http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,35567.msg773211/topicseen.html#msg773211

I spend some time at my local Kosher cafe, not on account of my religion (as I'm Christian), but on account that  it's located inside my local supermarket, and I stop for lunch before work and a snack after work, so I get to see all those brands often

Quote
I buy these mixes and mix them with things that would make kosher cooks cringe.


Mmmm.  Nothing like shrimp in chicken bouillon, eh? How about using those croutons in a salad with bacon lettuce and tomato? How about a mushroom-oyster cream-based sauce, flavoured with the beef bouillon mix for the roasted beef entrée? Nothing wrong there Grin

Oy vey! Shame on you! You shall fall out of grace!  Roll Eyes Tongue  Grin
« Last Edit: December 07, 2015, 06:29:44 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #870 on: December 07, 2015, 09:54:12 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
In Madrid, we have the Casa Miro, purveyors of marchpane and turrón (turrón could be defined as marchpane taken to a higher, more splendid level) and peladillas since 1855.
https://translate.google.es/translate?hl=en&sl=es&u=https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casa_Mira&prev=search
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4Odm8lhg-BI/VIzPBpBaiGI/AAAAAAAAQec/ZzVkDt8_UJA/s1600/casa%2Bmira.jpg

The queues to enter the shop during the holiday season are most impressive.

I remain yours,
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« Reply #871 on: December 07, 2015, 10:09:17 am »

Lovely looking shop and it qualifies for the list but yeuuch to everything inside, sorry but I truly hate Marzipan. Thank goodness it isn't on the British list.

What is yellow and swings from cake to cake? - Tarzipan.
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« Reply #872 on: December 07, 2015, 12:33:44 pm »

With you there, unclealbert! Marzipan, or Marchpane as it was known to the Tudors, is one of the most disgusting foodstuffs ever invented.
How to ruin a perfectly good fruitcake - cover it with almond marzipan (cake filler).
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« Reply #873 on: December 07, 2015, 12:36:31 pm »

With you there, unclealbert! Marzipan, or Marchpane as it was known to the Tudors, is one of the most disgusting foodstuffs ever invented.
How to ruin a perfectly good fruitcake - cover it with almond marzipan (cake filler).

I like mazipan D:
it's eaten without the cakes here. special seasonal treats, mostly balls made to look like oranges.
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« Reply #874 on: December 07, 2015, 12:42:05 pm »

Caledonian, you are most welcome to as much marzipan as you can eat - you can even have my share! Grin

Marzipan filler on my 21st birthday cake is still a horrible memory, even after so many years - I never got to eat a piece of it because of that stuff! Grin
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