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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 191614 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #825 on: August 05, 2015, 05:59:13 am »

Apparently I forgot to explore two American brands that I see every day, and I had assumed that they were included.  Also very famous brands...

I use Ghirardelli chips all the time; second in taste tests only to Baker's brand, which Ghirardelli seems to have crowded off the shelves.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baker%27s_Chocolate_(brand)

Baker's, it seems, dates to the eighteenth century. Is it on the list yet?

Eureka!  You have found another brand for the list!

Baker's Chocolate (Maker of baking chocolate. Estd. in 1764 by John Hannon and the American physician Dr. James Baker, Dorchester, Massachusetts)
Updated in American List on previous page.
~ ~ ~


Quote
In 1764, John Hannon (or alternatively spelled "Hannan" in some sources) and the American physician Dr. James Baker started importing beans and producing chocolate in the Lower Mills section of Dorchester, Massachusetts.[2]

After Hannon never returned from a 1779 sailing trip to the West Indies to purchase cocoa beans, his wife sold the company to Dr. Baker in 1780, and the company was renamed to the Baker Chocolate Company.[3] His first product was a cake of chocolate for making a sweetened chocolate drink.

Distribution was mainly in the Northeastern United States until 1804, when Dr. Baker's son, Edmund Baker, inherited the family business and increased production with a state-of-the-art mill.
By 1849, under Walter Baker, the Baker's Chocolate brand had spread to California, during the Gold Rush era.

Production was limited to one kind of chocolate until 1852, when employee Samuel German created a new brand of "Sweet Chocolate" that had a higher sugar content than previous baking chocolates. This chocolate was given his name and called "German's Sweet Chocolate". A Dallas, Texas newspaper later printed a cake recipe based on this chocolate with the misnomer "German chocolate cake," a name which stuck through the years.

Production steadily increased through the century. The trademark logo of La Belle Chocolatiere was adopted in 1883 by the fourth-generation familial owner, Henry L. Pierce, step-nephew of Walter Baker. Pierce began advertising Baker's Chocolate heavily in newspapers to increase sales. Promotional offers of tableware and logo pins helped attract customers.

At his death in 1896, the Forbes Syndicate bought the company. They eventually sold the company to the Postum Cereal Company, later known as General Foods. In 1969, production of Baker's Chocolate moved from Dorchester, Massachusetts to Dover, Delaware. The company was passed onto Kraft Foods in 1989 when they acquired General Foods.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2015, 06:10:22 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #826 on: August 27, 2015, 11:34:59 pm »

My nephew just delivered and 5 boxes of Leclerc cookies. Watch this space for a review.
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« Reply #827 on: August 31, 2015, 08:17:04 pm »

So we are back to the age-old problem, is chocolate a food?

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« Reply #828 on: September 03, 2015, 04:37:25 am »

Poutine is quite recent, but it is also proudly 100% Canadian, and makes no pretence at any association with France. My point was that French-Canadian food is not French, it's Canadian. Wink
As much as I love Poutine (and as a Canadian I am legally sworn to never say anything negative about Poutine,  Cheddar cheese,  Pea meal Back Bacon or Maple syrup ) remember that it is more of a recipe than a brand.   Is there an English translation for Poutine? And does it matter?
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« Reply #829 on: September 03, 2015, 06:46:16 am »

So we are back to the age-old problem, is chocolate a food?




I'm unsure whether we should separate drink, candy and food from each other.  I don't think the ancient peoples of Mesoamerica (the first people to use the cacao seeds), actually made that distinction.  If I look at the subsequent invention of chocolate after the Conquest (namely at the hands of the New Spanish), then one look at Mole sauce will settle the matter.

Poblano style Mole has chocolate in it, and Mole is the generic name for a number of Native Mexican sauces that were so thick and rich in content (being made of ground pumpkin seeds, chiles, peanuts, and other items), that they were considered to be part of the main dish, rather than just a sauce - similar to Curry.

The sauce was intended to carry an important part of the nutritional content of a meal, because large game was largely made extinct at the hands of prehistoric humans, long before the classic Mesoamerican period.

The natives took to eating all sorts of things, to complete their diet, including insects, worms and dogs, and they learned how to extract the most they could from the ingredients around them with  nixtamalization of maize being a prime example of the labour required to complete the diet.  Chocolate is not far behind, given that cocoa must be made by fermenting the cocoa seeds from the pod.  One must then roast grind and pulverize, separating the cocoa butter from the solids.  That is a lot of effort to undergo.

Seeds and nuts were a very important part of their diet, and I doubt that they would have regarded cocoa nibs as distinct from food.

Hence it seems to me one can make the case that chocolate was and has always been thought of as food.  The food of the gods, suitable for kings, according to ancient lore.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2015, 06:57:19 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #830 on: September 13, 2015, 09:05:09 pm »

Poutine is quite recent, but it is also proudly 100% Canadian, and makes no pretence at any association with France. My point was that French-Canadian food is not French, it's Canadian. Wink
As much as I love Poutine (and as a Canadian I am legally sworn to never say anything negative about Poutine,  Cheddar cheese,  Pea meal Back Bacon or Maple syrup ) remember that it is more of a recipe than a brand.   Is there an English translation for Poutine? And does it matter?

Like most dishes, French describes it in a single word or in a noun and an adjective for it and English describes it in a short phrase. Poutine would be "chips, gravy and grated cheese".
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« Reply #831 on: September 14, 2015, 09:17:17 am »

The French and continentals quite often name their dishes. The Brits don't tend to do it, although we have shepherd's pie (no actual shepherd), cottage pie (no cottages) &c but our meal names tend to describe the contents (pie and mash). The French naming confuses the average Brit, first you have to translate then you need to understand what meal it applies to. I've had a Belgian laugh at me for the simplicity of our naming convention.

Poutine or "chips, gravy and cheese", doesn't sound a 'classy' dish but I am sure it is tasty. We have "cheesey chips" here, in my local pub, double-cooked and covered in cheese, not 'classy' but very good and very filling.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2015, 09:21:15 am by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
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« Reply #832 on: September 27, 2015, 11:35:13 pm »

Have we mentioned Australia a all in this thread? EDIT: actually never mind, I think we have, we may have an Australian curator as well perhaps?

I got in my hands a package of Arnott's Original biscuits, which I found at my local super a couple of days ago. I was most sprised to read (as these are rare, yet highly appreciated here) that Pepperidge Farm, the speciality bakery company, is now seeking them in America (still made in Australia, and under the name Arnott's).

However upon gazing on the package of Tim Tams, I realized that Arnott's is  another Victorian Era brand.  Arnott's Biscuits was founded in 1865, by William Arnott, a Scottish immigrant who opened a bakery on Hunter Street, Newcastle, New South Wales. Today they sell a while range of savoury and sweet biscuits, of which their most famous is Tim Tams, a chocolate filled and covered sandwich biscuit.

The Arnott's Biscuits company was bought outright by the Campbell's Soup Company, from America, in 1997, but the Americans did not attempt to change the brand or formulation, following a popular outcry in Australia. The brand was never marketed in the US either, until this year (2015), now being distributed by Pepperidge Farms. Before 2015, Tim Tams could only be found at a local import chain under the name "Arnott's Original"

Arnott's Biscuits / maker of Tim Tam (Founded by Wm. Arnott, Newcastle, NSW, Australia, in 1865)



« Last Edit: September 28, 2015, 02:40:20 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #833 on: September 28, 2015, 04:55:39 pm »

I like to claim all colonial brands in the name of Great Britain and the Empire...

Well, if they have been imbibed or eaten and as a result is well-known to Brits on their journies, or if the brand has had exposure back on blighty then I feel justified. Smiley

Arnott's weren't available in the UK until recently, so maybe I can't claim this particular brand.


« Last Edit: September 30, 2015, 12:08:24 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
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« Reply #834 on: September 28, 2015, 05:44:51 pm »

Pro Vita biscuits from South Africa, a sort of crispbread/biscuit - the brand exists from the latter part of the 19th century. The crispbread biscuits were on sale from the 1920s but prior to that it was a health-bread. The brand is good for a South African list but the currently named product is a little later though the change from bread to crispbread might just allow it on the list.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2015, 12:07:41 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
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« Reply #835 on: September 30, 2015, 12:09:57 pm »

So we are back to the age-old problem, is chocolate a food?




I was joking really. Tongue
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« Reply #836 on: October 05, 2015, 09:32:28 pm »

Adluh Flour started in around 1900.

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« Reply #837 on: October 05, 2015, 11:22:52 pm »

Now I can't really find much info about "Melhuish's Flour" as I'm distantly related, it would be nice to see if they're still around. (I think they had a factory/mill somewhere in London & that's all I know) Grin


Sorry old boy, the brand is no longer extant...nor the mill.
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« Reply #838 on: October 05, 2015, 11:45:31 pm »

Now I can't really find much info about "Melhuish's Flour" as I'm distantly related, it would be nice to see if they're still around. (I think they had a factory/mill somewhere in London & that's all I know) Grin


Sorry old boy, the brand is no longer extant...nor the mill.


Oh well, never mind, thank you for the info anyway old bean.  Grin
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« Reply #839 on: October 06, 2015, 01:53:01 pm »

Apparently the brewers Hall & Wodhouse started brewing around 1777.  They are famous for the Badger Beers.  They used this name in 1900.  Plus what would a voyage of discovery be without a tasty tipple.
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« Reply #840 on: October 06, 2015, 07:07:10 pm »

We have a surfeit of beer!
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« Reply #841 on: October 06, 2015, 09:06:20 pm »

I seem to remember (so please correct me if I'm wrong) that Birds Powdered Custard was invented sometime in the 19th Century due to Mr. Birds wife being allergic to eggs.
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« Reply #842 on: October 06, 2015, 09:10:21 pm »

Yes, that is correct, we already have Birds but we can't have eggs...
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« Reply #843 on: October 06, 2015, 10:57:20 pm »

Yes, that is correct, we already have Birds but we can't have eggs...

You old joker.   Grin
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« Reply #844 on: October 26, 2015, 08:29:15 pm »

Poutine is quite recent, but it is also proudly 100% Canadian, and makes no pretence at any association with France. My point was that French-Canadian food is not French, it's Canadian. Wink
As much as I love Poutine (and as a Canadian I am legally sworn to never say anything negative about Poutine,  Cheddar cheese,  Pea meal Back Bacon or Maple syrup ) remember that it is more of a recipe than a brand.   Is there an English translation for Poutine? And does it matter?

I believe the word is a French-Canadian corruption of the English "pudding".
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« Reply #845 on: October 27, 2015, 06:03:38 pm »

Sounds plausible but you have chips and cheese with gravy for pudding?

Does "Canadian" and "Cuisine" go together? I'm beginning to doubt it.

In any case it isn't steampunk, it is the wrong date. Poutine is relegated to another non-steampunk thread please!
« Last Edit: October 27, 2015, 06:06:42 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
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« Reply #846 on: October 27, 2015, 10:41:39 pm »

Does "Canadian" and "Cuisine" go together? I'm beginning to doubt it.

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« Reply #847 on: October 27, 2015, 10:52:39 pm »

My apologies  Grin
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« Reply #848 on: October 28, 2015, 03:20:17 am »

Pro Vita biscuits from South Africa, a sort of crispbread/biscuit - the brand exists from the latter part of the 19th century. The crispbread biscuits were on sale from the 1920s but prior to that it was a health-bread. The brand is good for a South African list but the currently named product is a little later though the change from bread to crispbread might just allow it on the list.

I am at my local supermarket, and I have in my hands a package of Bahlsen "Hit" sandwich biscuits, made in Poland.  The package claims heritage to 1889. Does any one know anything about this brand?

I also have a British Jacob's brand package of "cream crackers."  The package claims heritage to 1885. Have these been included?

Thirdly I have a box of "Stropwafels" sandwich caramel wafers  made by Daelman's,  who claim heritage back to 1909.  Any info  on these?

Fourthly I have the Tim Tams,  and I'm debating taking a package back home  Grin


Lastly, Nabisco is marketing a "belVita"  brand "breakfast biscuit"  using the British sense of the word,  curiously enough, in both hard biscuit and chewy cookie versions for lack of better terms.  They look somewhat like granola bars to me.  Could this be a copycat of the South African  Pro Vita?


They're all between $3 and $4 each (actually the Hit are the cheapest at $1.68 and the Stropwafels are the most expensive at $4,  all others are $3). Which one is worth taking home?  Grin
« Last Edit: October 28, 2015, 03:49:50 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #849 on: October 28, 2015, 03:45:08 pm »

BelVitas are trying to sell themselves as a health food, thus the avoidance of the word "cookie".

They are, however, cookies, sold in the cookie aisle and not with the granola bars.

The one I tried seemed an okay butter cookie.  The fact that Nabisco is trying to sell them as a breakfast food rubs me the wrong way.

When in doubt I always go with stroopwaffels.
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