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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 191682 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #800 on: July 29, 2015, 11:09:58 pm »

Or basically the equivalent of Tex-Mex, and of questionable taste, like "Chili con Carne" or  "Chinichangas" (although Chili con Carne is not too bad, can be good as an acquired taste, and historically, it's legitimately Texan in origin).
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« Reply #801 on: July 29, 2015, 11:34:44 pm »

But my characterization above is unfair.  Cuisine, like language is constantly evolving and Poutine is not any less legitimate than Jambalaya as Cajun cuisine, or Bolovanes as French-Mexican cuisine. My bad for implying otherwise.

Currently Southwestern food is forming and evolving in the 21st C as a better than fast-food type of cuisine thanks to the food literatti in the US.
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« Reply #802 on: July 29, 2015, 11:39:29 pm »

Or basically the equivalent of Tex-Mex, and of questionable taste, like "Chili con Carne" or  "Chinichangas" (although Chili con Carne is not too bad, can be good as an acquired taste, and historically, it's legitimately Texan in origin).

Not so much. Quebecois cuisine has had 400 years to evolve away from its French roots and to absorb English, Irish and First Nations influences to the point that it is self-confidently distinct from French cuisine. The "French" in "French-Canadian" refers to the language, not the nationality.
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« Reply #803 on: July 30, 2015, 12:32:04 am »

Poutine doesn't go that far back though...
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« Reply #804 on: July 30, 2015, 12:38:18 am »

Poutine is quite recent, but it is also proudly 100% Canadian, and makes no pretence at any association with France. My point was that French-Canadian food is not French, it's Canadian. Wink
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« Reply #805 on: July 30, 2015, 12:46:39 am »

Same as a Hamburger steak (and thus sandwich) is not from Hamburg. It's root is certainly European and perhaps could be labelled as immigrant food.  But it's origin can't be traced for much longer than 100 years...
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« Reply #806 on: July 30, 2015, 12:49:47 am »

My grandfather used to joke that Tartar sauce was invented by the Tartars, who like to eat sandwiches of raw meat with Tartar sauce  Cheesy
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« Reply #807 on: July 30, 2015, 01:02:00 am »

While riding galloping horses.
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von Corax
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« Reply #808 on: July 30, 2015, 01:16:06 am »

Actually, I'm given to understand (true story) that several years ago a Royal Commission (the Canadian equivalent of the Usanian Senate Subcommittee) was set up with a dozen or so top-ranked Canadian chefs, to definitively determine what constitutes "Canadian" cuisine.

After something like a month and a half, they came back and proclaimed, "It's all Canadian."
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« Reply #809 on: July 30, 2015, 01:50:30 am »

I say we try to sell the "Ghengis Khan with Double Tartar Sauce," but E. Coli might be a problem...
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« Reply #810 on: July 30, 2015, 04:55:00 am »

I've just found my other list, and have added the following brands:
  • Canadian Club Canadian whiskey (Hiram Walker Distillery est. Walkerville ON, 1858; name first used 1889)
  • Seagram's gin (Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Waterloo ON, 1857)
  • Wiser's Whiskey Distillery (Prescott ON, 1857)
  • Fry's cocoa (first imported mid-1870s)
  • Moir's chocolates (Halifax NS, 1873)

I've also added this brand:
  • Black River Cheese (Milford ON; est. 1870; inc. 1901)
which I spotted in a local supermarket just this evening, gracing a package of cheddar curd of the sort used in poutine. Wink
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« Reply #811 on: July 30, 2015, 08:23:09 am »

Anyone mention Altoids?
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« Reply #812 on: July 30, 2015, 08:26:22 am »

Anyone mention Altoids?
Indeed, I think we did... it must have been one of the first entries.
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« Reply #813 on: August 02, 2015, 10:01:55 pm »

Can Tewkesbury Mustard be included in the list?
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« Reply #814 on: August 03, 2015, 01:01:49 am »

Not sure. We may have to redefine a brand in the context of the time it was created in.
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« Reply #815 on: August 03, 2015, 01:16:59 am »

Based on my own minimal knowledge, I would call Tewkesbury mustard a recipe rather than a brand.
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« Reply #816 on: August 03, 2015, 07:50:04 am »

Just to show you that some very famous brands will still go under the radar even now. I was reading this article on favourite cowboy foods and was alerted to VanCamp's Pork and Beans, which I see every day at any local suoer.

In 1861 there was a cold food storage warehouse started by business associates Gilbert VanCamp, Calvin Fletcher and Martin Williams, in Indianapolis, Indiana. By the following year, they had started a fruit and vegetable canning company.  During the Civil War, they became suppliers of canned foods for the Union, and their canned Pork and Beans became a favourite among the troops. The brand continues today as part of the ConAgra group.


Van Camp's Canned Pork and Beans (Today part of the ConAgra Group, it was originally founded in 1862 as a fruits and vegetable canning firm, founded by Gilbert VanCamp, Calvin Fletcher and Martin Williams, in Indianapolis, Indiana. Famous for supplying Pork and Beans to Union troops during US Civil War).


The updated American List:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)


~~~
« Last Edit: August 05, 2015, 06:05:58 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #817 on: August 03, 2015, 12:25:03 pm »

Has anyone had Be-Ro yet? Technically Victorian, since Be-Ro started out as "Bells Royal" before it became illegal to use "Royal" in your product name (after the death of Edward VII in 1910) - unless, presumably, you were "by Royal appointment."

http://www.be-ro.co.uk/f_about.htm
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« Reply #818 on: August 03, 2015, 09:12:18 pm »

Is it illegal to sell Uniroyal tires in England?
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« Reply #819 on: August 03, 2015, 10:35:17 pm »

Is it illegal to sell Uniroyal tires in England?

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« Reply #820 on: August 04, 2015, 02:18:52 am »



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« Reply #821 on: August 04, 2015, 05:09:58 am »

Apparently I forgot to explore two American brands that I see every day, and I had assumed that they were included.  Also very famous brands...

The first is outside of the Gilded Age range, and I was unclear because the present company was founded in 1906.  However, I found out that the company and brand was purchased from an Italian company of the same name, founded in the late 1800s in Lucca Italy. So, that being the hair that broke the camel's back, I will include it based on the grounds that the product, and technical know how followed the brand from Italy through to the United States before the turn of the century.

http://www.pompeian.com/about-us.aspx
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pompeian,_Inc.


Pompeian Olive Oil: (Originally founded in late 1800s, Lucca Italy.  Purchased and re-founded in Baltimore Maryland in 1906. First American producer of extra virgin olive oil. Today they make a variety of vinegars and oils and products for salads).
(Already updated in American List above on this page)



The second brand is a chocolate company, started by Italians in San Francisco during the times of the "American Barbary Coast" in 1852.  The founder was an Italian chocolatier, but NOT an immigrant to the United States, but rather an immigrant to South America; Uruguay to be more specific (remember that large numbers of Italians migrated to the Rio de la Plata region in Argentina and Uruguay?).  He sailed with his wife to Uruguay circa 1836 to work in the cocoa and coffee business, and by 1838 he had moved to the city of Lima in Peru, opening his first shop further away from the Italian migrant region in South America.

In 1847, James Lick, a nephew of Ghirardelli moved to San Francisco to sell 600 pounds of Ghirardelli's chocolate, and in 1849 Ghirardelli received news from the Gold Strike (Gold Rush) in California, thus making the decision to move and open a general store in the mining town of Stockton. In 1852 he opened his second store in San Francisco.

Ghirardelli Chocolate (Maker of chocolates and confectionary. Originally founded by Domenico Ghirardelli circa 1838 in Lima, Peru, it was re founded in 1852 in San Francisco, California)
(Already updated in American List on this page above)


https://www.ghirardelli.com/our-story
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghirardelli_Chocolate_Company





~ ~ ~

In other news, I found the European list as compiled by Mr. Bicyclebuilder, and I have added several brands to the list, mostly Italian names, which I can find as imported items at my local super:

The European list (UK excluded)
(Past List)
Nestles condensed milk (Switzerland 1866)
De Ruijter (Netherlands 1860)
Duvel (Belgium 1871)
Perrier water (France 1898)
Knorr (Germany 1838)
Maggi (Switzerland 1872: A Nestlé brand)
Bertolli (Italy 1865)
Bières de Chimay (Belgium 1863) Trappist Beer
Westmalle (Belgium 1836) Trappist Beer
St Sixtus (Belgium 1838) Trappist Beer
Koningshoeven/La Trappe (Netherlands 1884) Trappist Beer
Spa Water (Belgium sometime in 1600s)
Devos Lemmens (Belgium 1886) Campbell Soup company.
Honig dried foods (Netherlands 1895) Heinz group
Heineken (Netherlands 1873)
~ ~ ~
(Recently Researched)
Hellema (Pastry bakery, now known as Hellema-Hallum B.V. Founded in 1861 by Andele Wiegers Hellema, in the village of Hallum, Friesland, Netherlands)
Lambertz bakery 1688 Germany
~ ~ ~
(List not researched yet)
Barilla Pasta 1877 (Italy)
DeCecco Pasta 1886 (Italy)
Fratelli Mantova Olives 1905 (Italy)
Filipo Berio Olive Oil, 1867 (Italy)
Carbonell Oil 1866, Spain
Maille Mustard, 1723, 1747, (Marseille, France)

So this is a good day for the Italians, overall.  I have to research these brands immediately above to get more details .. soon...
« Last Edit: August 04, 2015, 08:51:15 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #822 on: August 04, 2015, 07:01:49 am »

What about London Pub?
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #823 on: August 04, 2015, 08:28:08 am »

What about London Pub?


You mean this?

http://www.worldfiner.com/london-pub-english-condiments-sauces/english-condiments-sauces.html

This is a brand from a company called World Finer Foods; While they have interesting products like Steak and Chop Sauce and Major Grey Chutney, the company started in 1975 - long after the end of the Victorian Period (ended 1901) and/or the Gilded Age (ended 1900). I'm not even counting Kraft Foods, and they started in  1903 !  I could extend it to WWI but that will double the size of the list.  The UK list and the US list are the most stringent, while the Canadian, Mexican and Japanese lists get a little leeway into the Edwardian Period on account of a delayed Industrial Revolution and/or smaller economy (delayed development).
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« Reply #824 on: August 05, 2015, 01:45:20 am »

Apparently I forgot to explore two American brands that I see every day, and I had assumed that they were included.  Also very famous brands...

I use Ghirardelli chips all the time; second in taste tests only to Baker's brand, which Ghirardelli seems to have crowded off the shelves.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baker%27s_Chocolate_(brand)

Baker's, it seems, dates to the eighteenth century. Is it on the list yet?
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