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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 191675 times)
RJBowman
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« Reply #775 on: July 15, 2015, 11:09:19 pm »

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breyers
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History[edit]

Breyer ice cream truck, circa 1915
In 1866 William A. Breyer began to produce and sell "iced cream" in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, first from his home, and later via horse and wagon on the streets. Breyer’s son Henry incorporated the business in 1908. The formerly independent Breyer Ice Cream Company was sold to the National Dairy Products Corporation in 1926; National Dairy changed its name to Kraftco in 1969, and Kraft by 1975. Kraft sold its ice cream brands to Unilever in 1993, while retaining the rights to the name for yogurt products.[2]

Cost-cutting[edit]
Prior to 2006,[3] Breyers was known for producing ice cream with a small number of all-natural ingredients. In recent years, as part of cost-cutting measures since their move from Green Bay, Wisconsin to Unilever's U.S. headquarters in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey,[4] Unilever has reformulated many of its flavors with nontraditional, additive ingredients, significantly changing the taste and texture of their desserts as a result.[3] Following similar practices by several of their competitors, and to the consternation of many former customers,[3] Breyers' list of ingredients has expanded to include natural food additives such as tara gum[5] and carob bean gum,[6] artificial additives such as maltodextrin and propylene glycol,[7] and common artificially separated and extracted ingredients such as corn syrup, whey, and others.[6][7]
One result of these cost-cutting practices has been that many of Breyer's U.S. products no longer contain enough milk and cream to be considered "ice cream", and are now labeled "Frozen Dairy Dessert",[8] or "Frozen Dessert" in Canada.[9][10]
For several decades over 30% of Breyers products, including most of its products sold in the northeastern U.S., were produced in a large plant outside Boston, in Framingham, Massachusetts. As part of cost-cutting by Unilever, the plant was closed in March 2011.

The first time I had Breyers in the early 1980's it was the best ice cream I'd ever had, but recently it didn't seem as good as it used to be. I wasn't sure if the ice cream wasn't as good as it used to be or my memory was exaggerating how good it was. Now I know.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #776 on: July 16, 2015, 12:07:49 am »

It boggles the mind.  It's not like they made their product more competitive. A plethora of makers have made more money selling real ice cream at highr prices.

What Nestlé did to Doña Maria mole is unforgivable.  A tried and true and very successful convenience product from the 20th. C, that needed no tweaking. They need to be taken to the gallows for that one.

Sometimes I suspect they do it just to own the rights of the recipe.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #777 on: July 16, 2015, 12:24:03 am »

They buy a product to get the brand name and the customer base that comes with it, and then they think that they can degrade the product and keep the customer base. Some customers will be fooled, but others will not. Unilever, who bought Breyers, is a soap manufacturer. Nestle's, who is a very old food processing company, buys a lot of small competitors, and gets a lot of complaints on this forum.
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« Reply #778 on: July 27, 2015, 08:30:03 am »

Speaking of procrastinating, I really must get the Canadian list up to date.

Also you need to look at the link provided in the Historical Section and you need to define your "rules" for curating the Canadian List!  We need to find a replacement for Akumabito for the European List (in fact there is no list - it's just haphazzardly mentioned), since I haven't seen Akumabito in a long time....
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #779 on: July 27, 2015, 11:24:20 am »

They buy a product to get the brand name and the customer base that comes with it, and then they think that they can degrade the product and keep the customer base. Some customers will be fooled, but others will not. Unilever, who bought Breyers, is a soap manufacturer. Nestle's, who is a very old food processing company, buys a lot of small competitors, and gets a lot of complaints on this forum.

Appropriate quality for the market... no point in making it so good because most won't notice. It is utterly sad but the curse of all US brands that we are exposed to over here. They'll spend a huge amount on branding and advertising but very little on the product itself. US manufactured products sold over here do not have the perception of quality any more. They used to once upon a time.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #780 on: July 27, 2015, 05:32:26 pm »

What amazes me is the number of people that just don't know the difference. They can't taste the difference between good food and bad food, and will continue to buy the same brand after the product inside the box has been cheapened and downgraded.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #781 on: July 28, 2015, 01:55:12 am »

They buy a product to get the brand name and the customer base that comes with it, and then they think that they can degrade the product and keep the customer base. Some customers will be fooled, but others will not. Unilever, who bought Breyers, is a soap manufacturer. Nestle's, who is a very old food processing company, buys a lot of small competitors, and gets a lot of complaints on this forum.

Appropriate quality for the market... no point in making it so good because most won't notice. It is utterly sad but the curse of all US brands that we are exposed to over here. They'll spend a huge amount on branding and advertising but very little on the product itself. US manufactured products sold over here do not have the perception of quality any more. They used to once upon a time.

It's the "most won't notice" part that I doubt. I wonder how many Mexicans did not notice that chocolate, one of the main ingredients in Poblano Mole sauce was replaced by burned pulverised biscuits - Noting that the ingredient which separates Poblano from other mole sauces is chocolate.  It a bit like trying to sell a Mars bar without cocoa.
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« Reply #782 on: July 28, 2015, 02:30:44 am »

I just found we have Colman's Mustard (1814) and Mustard powder at my local super.  We had already mentioned it on page 2 for the UK list.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2015, 04:55:38 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
RJBowman
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« Reply #783 on: July 28, 2015, 04:31:27 am »

Here's one:
http://www.boetjesmustard.com
A regional brand of mustard popular in western Illinois and eastern Iowa. Family lore says that Mr. Boetje was a door-to-door vender in my great grandparents neighborhood.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #784 on: July 28, 2015, 04:55:09 am »

Here's one:
http://www.boetjesmustard.com
A regional brand of mustard popular in western Illinois and eastern Iowa. Family lore says that Mr. Boetje was a door-to-door vender in my great grandparents neighborhood.


There you go Mr. Bowman! We can't have the Brits have all the mustard, eh?  Grin (Although we do have Heinz).

Boetje Mustard (Maker of stoneground Dutch mustard. Founded in 1889, by Fred Boetje in Rock Island, Illinois)
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #785 on: July 28, 2015, 08:58:57 am »

It a bit like trying to sell a Mars bar without cocoa.

Actually a Mars bar is made with as little cocoa as possible. Palm oil instead of cocoa butter, once again, appropriate quality. 23% cocoa whereas good quality chocolate is normally 30-70% minimum.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #786 on: July 28, 2015, 05:22:17 pm »

It a bit like trying to sell a Mars bar without cocoa.

Actually a Mars bar is made with as little cocoa as possible. Palm oil instead of cocoa butter, once again, appropriate quality. 23% cocoa whereas good quality chocolate is normally 30-70% minimum.

I just read this funny article on almond milk, traditionally favoured by the new-age "Wisdom of the Orient," as well as  hipster and conservationist crowds.

It turns out there is almost no almond content in almond milk.

Now I have to break the news to my hipster room mate. The yoga mat will be lonely tonight Grin

https://www.yahoo.com/food/turns-out-almond-milk-has-no-almonds-in-it-125200270086.html
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von Corax
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« Reply #787 on: July 28, 2015, 09:05:49 pm »

The Dominion List as it stood when last I updated it, on 7 April 2012. Embarrassed

Here is the current list for the Dominion of Canada of food brands readily available both during the reign of HM Queen Victoria and today. I'm also listing known Victorian brands which do not qualify for the Canadian list. Both lists are works in progress, and are of course subject to revision.


Spoiler: Available brands: (click to show/hide)

Spoiler: Disqualified brands: (click to show/hide)

I think I have a few more brands in a file on another computer somewhere, and I have yet to add Leclerc Bros. Biscuits.

I am also currently undecided whether to include or exclude Edwardian (1901-1910) brands. What say you?
« Last Edit: July 30, 2015, 04:52:28 am by von Corax » Logged

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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #788 on: July 28, 2015, 09:35:09 pm »

I'd say Edwardian is fine...
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #789 on: July 28, 2015, 11:52:40 pm »

The Dominion List as it stood when last I updated it, on 7 April 2012. Embarrassed

Here is the current list for the Dominion of Canada of food brands readily available both during the reign of HM Queen Victoria and today. I'm also listing known Victorian brands which do not qualify for the Canadian list. Both lists are works in progress, and are of course subject to revision.


Spoiler: Available brands: (click to show/hide)

Spoiler: Disqualified brands: (click to show/hide)

I think I have a few more brands in a file on another computer somewhere, and I have yet to add Leclerc Bros. Biscuits.

I am also currently undecided whether to include or exclude Edwardian (1901-1910) brands. What say you?


HP Sauce at 1903, was that out of period, or due to product issues?

Yeah, I've cutoff around 1900, but a number of famous brands could emerge after that (eg super giant Kraft Foods (1903) and now split into Kraft Foods (USA) + Mondelez Group (Global)), But this started as a Victorian Era list, so I ended it circa the end of the Gilded Age. For Japan and Mexico I did allow a later period, on account of a late Industrial Era development.

In Mexico City wealthy people drove Ford cards in the city, but a few businesses, including mortuaries (hearses) still had horse drawn carries running on the street.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2015, 12:12:38 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
von Corax
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« Reply #790 on: July 29, 2015, 12:36:05 am »

HP Sauce at 1903, was that out of period, or due to product issues?
It was excluded by date, but if I'm to include Edwardian brands (I shall use our smaller economy as rationalization) then both HP and Heinz Canada are back on the list.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #791 on: July 29, 2015, 01:52:32 am »

If you don't have a lot on your list then you are allowed to stretch it a bit... can't only drink beer and eat meat.

Hold on, you can!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #792 on: July 29, 2015, 02:13:01 am »

You need to at least be able to make Poutine  Grin 
(But if I understand correctly this is 1950s Diner fare)
« Last Edit: July 29, 2015, 07:34:37 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #793 on: July 29, 2015, 10:10:54 am »

Never heard of Poutine, wrong era / landmass for my small brain.
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von Corax
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« Reply #794 on: July 29, 2015, 06:57:38 pm »

An off-topic conversation on poutine.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #795 on: July 29, 2015, 07:20:49 pm »

Never heard of Poutine, wrong era / landmass for my small brain.

Basically, someone north of the Great Lakes decided that heaping French fries (or proper potato wedges/chips), sprinkling them with cheese curds and ladling brown gravy all over that would be a good idea...
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #796 on: July 29, 2015, 07:28:02 pm »

It's amazing I still continue to discover Victorian Era brands in my local super. As Uncle Bert pointed out the Japanese have very old brands.  Some Canadian brands and Mexican brands are now found in the "non-ethnic" isles of the supermarket as food companies become giant transnational conglomerates.

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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #797 on: July 29, 2015, 08:25:24 pm »

With regard to Poutine, French-influenced cuisine is normally rather good but I can't see the French eating that...

I'm not really that keen on trying it mysel'
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von Corax
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« Reply #798 on: July 29, 2015, 08:26:35 pm »

Poutine isn't French, it's French-Canadian.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #799 on: July 29, 2015, 09:19:40 pm »

That's why I said "French-influenced" rather than French.
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