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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 191613 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #725 on: February 15, 2015, 08:00:44 am »

(see the previous page in the thread for the American list and my last entry today-- I guess I ran out of space -again an in the same spot as last time  Grin )

The Mexican List: (Sanborns and Liverpool dept. store brands not included yet):

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

The updated Japanese list:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)


« Last Edit: May 24, 2015, 07:22:17 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #726 on: February 15, 2015, 11:39:42 am »

All good but I am sure they are on the list.

They are now.  Grin
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« Reply #727 on: February 16, 2015, 04:45:26 am »

All good but I am sure they are on the list.


They are now.  Grin


We are currently accepting membership applications at the Guild of Procrastinators.  Grin

http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,44422.0.html
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jonb
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« Reply #728 on: February 16, 2015, 01:53:44 pm »

The reason why brands became popular in the Victorian Period was that there was so much adulterated food being sold, rotten meat being made to look fresh with chemicals etcetera. So brands where the person knew the supplier and the supplier had to keep a good reputation became a good way of guarding the quality for the customer.
Given that is the reason why brand names became trade marked, so the producer could guarantee the quality, in this age where producers do not care about the quality of the product I think a little more thought should be put into trade marks.
So I think it is the recipe that should be trade marked with the name. If a producer changes the recipe then they should loose title to the product. Thus if Newcastle Brown Ale is no longer made in the same way then the trade mark should also be lost, the same would be true for Cadburys chocolate etc, in this way we the consumers can be sure of what we are buying which is the whole point of branding and fixing it into the law with trade marks.

I will get off my soap box now, but think about it, it is what we want.  
« Last Edit: February 16, 2015, 01:56:43 pm by jonb » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #729 on: February 16, 2015, 02:21:11 pm »

It is quite a good idea - trouble is, in the case of Newcastle Brown, removing the Caramel and replacing it with darker or burnt hops is definitely a better way of making the beer. In this case the enforced change is an improvement.

You can bet your boots that the caramel replaced this method in the first place. In my experience adding caramel to beer gives headaches and funny tummies...

In any case, it has no place on this list.

Changing the recipe of Cadbury's is definitely not an improvement.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2015, 02:47:39 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged

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« Reply #730 on: February 16, 2015, 02:32:59 pm »

Mackintosh's Toffee progenitors of Quality Street and Rolo are still with us even if Toffo has disappeared from the shelves for the moment (brands do reappear from time to time as owners such as Rowntree will occasionally resurrect a long-loved favourite)



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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #731 on: February 16, 2015, 02:43:39 pm »

Daddies Sauce 1904 just makes it into the list.



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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #732 on: February 16, 2015, 04:40:40 pm »

Just adding some pictures to recent additions.

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« Reply #733 on: February 16, 2015, 04:45:56 pm »


Atora suet.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #734 on: May 24, 2015, 12:57:44 am »

My local super in the Lone Star State has started importing Dutch Hellema-brand Speculaas (speculoos biscuits), and the company livery on the package claims the company to date back to 1861.  Have we included this in the European list? Does any one have more info?
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« Reply #735 on: May 24, 2015, 01:41:44 am »

http://www.hellema.com/cookies/every-day/original-speculaas
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #736 on: May 24, 2015, 07:03:41 am »



They don't seem to have a lot of info on their (English) corporate history... My Google Fu is failing (maybe if I spoke Dutch) All I see is "1861"

Never mind I found it

http://www.hellema.com/history

Hellema (Pastry bakery, now known as Hellema-Hallum B.V. Founded in 1861 by Andele Wiegers Hellema, in the village of Hallum, Friesland, Netherlands)


Say, whatever happened to our Dutch curator for the European list?  I haven't seen him in Brassgoggles for a very long time!
« Last Edit: May 24, 2015, 07:14:18 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #737 on: June 01, 2015, 12:14:09 am »

Here is the British list, refined and mostly dined.

Colman's Mustard - 1814
Harrington Cheese's Stilton (and Derbyshire) -- 1720
McVitie's Biscuits - 1830
Digestives and Rich Tea biscuits
Robertson's Golden Shred Marmalade - 1864
Twinings Tea - 1706
Bassett's Pontefract cakes - ~1760
Matthew Walker's Christmas puddings 1899
Barber's Cheddar Cheese 1833
Andrews Liver Salts - 1894
Warburtons bread - 1876
John West tinned salmon, mackerel and sardines 1857
Crosse and Blackwell chutneys and picallili 1706
Walls sausages and bacon - 1786
Walls pork pies 1786
R Whites lemonade - 1894
Idris ginger beer - 1873
Idris fizzy cream soda
Idris dandelion and baldock
Fyffe's bananas 1878
Taylor's of Harrogate tea and coffee (1886)
Irn Bru - 1901 under the name Strachan's Brew
Holland's Pies 1854
Dickinson and Morris 1851 (maker of Melton Mowbray pork pies)
Sarson's vinegar 1794
Sharwood's chutney 1889
Cerebos Salt 1894
Paxo stuffing (1901)
Hartley's jams 1871
Frank Cooper's 1874
Haywards pickles 1868
Geo. Watkins Mushroom Relish est.1830
HP Sauce 1895
Sharwoods Mango Chutney est 1889
Walkers Shortbread 1898
Suchard chocolate 1826
Atora beef suet 1893
Brown and Poulson's cornflour 1865
Borwick's baking powder 1895
Fentiman's ginger beer 1905
Coca cola 1900 (UK)
Robinson's barley water 1830
Rose's lime juice 1867
Scott's Porage Oats 1880
Perrier water 1898
Schweppes tonic 1771
Schweppes ginger ale (1870)
jacobs cream crackers 1885
oxo 1899
Carrs water biscuits 1841
Cadbury's cocoa 1824
Tate & lyle sugar 1877
Tate & lyle syrup
Tate & lyle treacle
Birds custard 1837
Bovril 1870
Golden shred marmalade 1864
Garabaldi biscuits 1861
Patum Peperium 1828
Fray Bentos corned beef 1899
Nestles condensed milk 1867
Typhoo tea 1903
Camp coffee 1876
Huntley and Palmers nice biscuits 1895
Shippams meat pastes 1896
Rowntrees pastilles 1881
Heinz beans 1886 (UK)
Jesmona Black Bullets
Jackson's of Picadilly fine teas
Tunnocks Tea cakes
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Wincarnis (mixed with Leibigs meat extract to restore the 'meatiness' !)
Nigroids
Angostura Bitters 1824
Jordans flour and granolas 1855
Mackays Marmalade 1938
glenryck's pilchards
carnation milk
terrys chocolate
cadburys chocolate
Batchelor's Mushy Peas 1895

Chivers' Marmalade 1873ish?
army biscuits
Marmite 1902
Symington's soups 1827
Liptons tea
Atora 1892
Guinness
Daddies Sauce 1904
Mackintosh's Toffee
Fry's chocolate
Buckminster Tonic Wine 1890s
Rowntree's Chocolate Kitkat &c 1862
Bourneville Chocolate
Whittard of Chelsea, Coffee and Tea (Retailer
of Tea and coffee, established in 1886 in London’s Fleet Street, by Walter Whittard, London UK - now in Witney, Oxfordshire)
Hendersons Relish
Marshall's pasta and semolina
Altoids
Barry's Tea 1901
Flavahans Oats 1812
White's Oats, In 1841
Shepherd Neame Brewery of 1698
Pittenweem oatcakes 1887
McKean's Butchers of Scotland - Haggis makers since 1850
Caley's Chocolate. Since 1885
Malvern bottled water has been in production since the 1620
Waiwera Infinity, first bottled in 1875
Perrier Water 1898ish
Wilkin & Sons Limited, 1885 preserves and marmalades
Ruddles Brewery
Timothy Taylor
Hartridges Soft Drink - 1882 - Hambledon, Hampshire
Bells Royal Self Raising Flour was first sold in 1880
Cerebos Salt (the victorian tin are a thing of beauty)
Heinz cream of Tomato Soup (Since 1910, they did a centenary label in 2010)
Stones Green Ginger wine (very authentic label)
Huntley and Palmer Biscuits
Nairn's Oatcakes
United Biscuit's Bath Olivers
tobasco sauce
Adnams of Southwold 1872
Princes established 1880.
Fox's Confectionery founded 1880.
Wrexham Lager founded 1881.
F. Duerr & Sons 1881 - jams and preserves
Farley's Rusks 1880s.
Brain's Beers founded 1882.
Fowler's Forest Dairies -  cheese
Ballyrashane Creamery- milk!, cream, butter - 1898
Bassett's liquorice Allsorts , introduced in 1899.
Bisto Gravy - 1908
J & A Fergusons Chocolate Manufacturer Greenock established in 1794
John Miller & Sons Chocolate Eclair sweets 1844
Allinson's flour
Botham’s of Whitby Yorkshire Brack
Farrah's toffee 1847
Palethorpe Pork Farms
A1 sauce
Hovis
Barber's Cheddar Cheese 1833
Baxters soups - 1868
Nestle Milk
McFarlane and Lang (United Biscuits)      Gingernut biscuits
Garibaldi biscuit
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #738 on: June 01, 2015, 12:17:21 am »

Thank you Uncle Bert!
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #739 on: June 01, 2015, 12:34:16 am »

I am aware it has been a while...

That list has grown and grown and it can feed a really rather good Victorian banquet now.

The next step will be to draw up a banquet especially made of items from that list. I did do a mini-banquet a while back, more of a meal for three. So a menu... Perhaps that can be the subject of a new thread?
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #740 on: June 01, 2015, 04:36:59 am »

I am aware it has been a while...

That list has grown and grown and it can feed a really rather good Victorian banquet now.

The next step will be to draw up a banquet especially made of items from that list. I did do a mini-banquet a while back, more of a meal for three. So a menu... Perhaps that can be the subject of a new thread?

Sounds like a splendid idea.  But one thing to consider, is that some thought needs to be placed on the order, presentation and types of branded foods used for the menus.  How does one go about making a Victorian menu? This, keeping in mind that Victorians had just invented such foods, but the products took time to incorporate and the recipes for prepared dishes would be different.  If I just pull the items straight from the list and incorporate into present day recipes, the menu would look more like the result from a supermarket shopping list to one of my caravan trips to Yellowstone in the 1970s
« Last Edit: June 01, 2015, 04:45:42 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #741 on: June 01, 2015, 04:46:42 am »

I am aware it has been a while...

That list has grown and grown and it can feed a really rather good Victorian banquet now.

The next step will be to draw up a banquet especially made of items from that list. I did do a mini-banquet a while back, more of a meal for three. So a menu... Perhaps that can be the subject of a new thread?

Sounds like a splendid idea.  But one thing to consider, is that some thought needs to be placed on the order, presentation and types of branded foods used for the menus.  How does one go about making a Victorian menu? This, keeping in mind that Victorians had just invented such foods, but the products took time to incorporate and the recipes for prepared dishes would be different.  If I just pull the items straight from the list and incorporate into present day recipes, the menu would look more like the result from a supermarket shopping list to one of my caravan trips to Yellowstone in the 1970s

EDIT: I'm also wondering whether to sticky this thread.  It certainly deserves its place.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #742 on: June 01, 2015, 04:32:26 pm »

A think a menu would be easy.

An Atora suet pudding for example would feature as the main, Fyffes banana trifle or similar could be a suitable dessert. Each menu item featuring the brand(s) used within.
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« Reply #743 on: June 02, 2015, 07:52:00 pm »

1899 Bassetts Liquorice Allsorts
Quiggins Kendal Mint Cake 1880
Mornflake Oats 1675
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RJBowman
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« Reply #744 on: June 02, 2015, 11:51:01 pm »

Here's one:
http://www.sanderscandy.com/

Sanders; a regional chain of confectionary shops, founded in 1875. I don't know if they have any specific product that has been in production for the entire time. These days the majority of their sales are through grocery stores.
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« Reply #745 on: June 03, 2015, 02:41:07 am »

Here's one:
http://www.sanderscandy.com/

Sanders; a regional chain of confectionary shops, founded in 1875. I don't know if they have any specific product that has been in production for the entire time. These days the majority of their sales are through grocery stores.


Well, if they were in business continuously, then there must be something...
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RJBowman
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« Reply #746 on: June 03, 2015, 03:53:05 am »

They sell cakes, ice cream, and candy. Their two major products are a chocolate cake called bumpy cake, and hot fudge sauce for ice cream sold in jars. The hot fudge sauce probably goes back to an early date, but I don't think that they have always sold it in jars.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #747 on: June 03, 2015, 03:58:20 am »

They sell cakes, ice cream, and candy. Their two major products are a chocolate cake called bumpy cake, and hot fudge sauce for ice cream sold in jars. The hot fudge sauce probably goes back to an early date, but I don't think that they have always sold it in jars.

El Globo got into the Mexican list by selling pastries in a brick and mortar, then a cafe style setting too.  Ditto for Café Du Monde in the US list. too.  I can simply apply the same rule.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #748 on: June 03, 2015, 05:10:35 am »

I think that Cafe' Du Monde was one of my contributions to the list.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #749 on: June 03, 2015, 05:46:01 am »

I think that Cafe' Du Monde was one of my contributions to the list.

Actually that was my former room-mate.  He had a can of ground coffee with chicory from Cafe Du Monde at our apartment, and I remembered that I had been there back in 2003.

They sell cakes, ice cream, and candy. Their two major products are a chocolate cake called bumpy cake, and hot fudge sauce for ice cream sold in jars. The hot fudge sauce probably goes back to an early date, but I don't think that they have always sold it in jars.

Why could they not sell the hot fudge in jars?? 
« Last Edit: June 03, 2015, 05:53:57 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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