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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 191612 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #625 on: April 14, 2013, 03:13:53 am »

I think that Japanese peanut snack might be called 'arare' --  they have it here in Hawaii, along with many other strange and wonderful children's treats like dried octopus.


It may be than Mr. Nakatani was trying to come up with something on the order of Arare, but he used wheat wrapped around the peanut instead of glutinous rice..  Nakatani's confection looks more like a savoury version of a peanut M&M without the chocolate.   I ignore if peanut Arare would have a whole peanut inside or not.

It would be interesting to see if Arare was being imported or made in Hawaii and available as a brand since the early 1900s, as there might be a Japanese/Hawaiian brand that could be introduced to the American list

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arare_%28food%29
Quote
Arare (あられ?, which is named after graupel "snow pellets") is a type of bite-sized Japanese cracker made from glutinous rice and flavored with soy sauce. The size and shapes are what distinguish arare from senbei. The name is chosen to evoke snow pellets – smaller arare are similar in size and shape to snow pellets, though others can vary significantly in size, flavor and shape. Arare is also called kakimochi or mochi crunch in Hawaii where it was introduced in the 1900s.

Japanese typically consume arare to celebrate the Doll Festival (Hinamatsuri), on March 3, Girls' Day in Japan. The arare made during the festival are very colorful - pink, yellow, white, brown, light green, and so on. Regular arare can be bought throughout the year, but the colorful ones are only available around January to March in anticipation of the Doll Festival.
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« Reply #626 on: April 16, 2013, 05:42:47 pm »

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« Reply #627 on: April 16, 2013, 10:35:49 pm »



Noted, formatted and placed in the hands of the UK list curator, Uncle Bert:

Whittard of Chelsea, Coffee and Tea (Retailer
of Tea and coffee, established in 1886 in London’s Fleet Street, by Walter Whittard, London UK - now in Witney, Oxfordshire)
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« Reply #628 on: April 19, 2013, 10:36:25 am »

Dear ladies and gentlemen:

After looking at the web-based Mexican list of food brands and failing to find more 19th C. brands (admittedly that list is not comprehensive), I started wringing more memories from the dark recesses of my mind.

It dawned on me that there are two potential sources for genuinely Victorian / Mex. Pre Revolutionary food brands, and these may be rather odd to you or not, depending on how you see it... perhaps not.

Earlier in the thread, we discussed British picnic baskets, and more specifically Harrod's and Fortnum & Mason's hampers.

It turns out that while Mexico may have suffered a delay in it's onset of industrialisation, the well to do were not that far behind Continental European and British customs, and one of those was the establishment of general stores which eventually would turn into the modern concept of the department store as we know it today.  Yes, you read right.  The well to do required a fresh supply of European commodities to compliment their existence in such exotic lands, and thus bright businessmen from Europe in Mexico established general stores that provided clothing as well as other goods imported from Europe, including food stuffs  (it's becoming a common theme, yes?  There is a lesson in Mexican history here somewhere).  Needless to say pegging these historical store brands may in fact bring to light more Victorian Era products that made it to Mexican shores and thus the list may go on growing.

Two very important department stores in Mexico.  Both rather successful and ubiquitous in that country.  Both catering to the people of good taste and good money *ahem*

I'll start with the oldest:  Liverpool, today a giant chain of department stores, and earlier a chain of general stores, founded by Jean Baptiste Ebrard, a French businessman in Mexico City in 1847.  The store originally was established as a clothing company under the name (translated) "The Cloth Case,"  but because much of the merchandise came from Liverpool, England, he eventually changed the name to El Puerto de Liverpool or just Liverpool.  The store began carrying general merchandise, including food in 1872, and eventually became the wealthiest department store in that country in the 20th. C.  The arrangement of the store is similar to Harrod's in that you can buy many types of items in the store.  They also happen to be famous for their upscale store food brands.  I will have to dig further, but it looks like imported brands from the UK and also in-store Mexican brands will make their way into the Mexican list...
(I'm willing to bet they carry proper tea biscuits in that store!)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liverpool_%28store%29
The first "large format" Liverpool building, built during the Jazz Era in the Art Deco style
Image in public domain by "Thelmadatter"

The second store is Sanborns, also a general store founded in 1903 by American immigrants from California, Walter and Frank Sanborn.  The store was also responsible for opening Mexico's first soda fountain. The situation with this store is very similar to Liverpool, except that most of their 20th. C. stores remained in a much smaller physical format (except the flagship stores in Mexico City), as opposed to the "Harrod's" giant scale of department stores we all know. They still carry many things under the sun (I won't say everything under the sun), including a mid-upscale restaurant for which they are famous, as well as a pharmacy, bookstore, arts and crafts, and naturally food brands...  I have a feeling some in-store brands, most likely upscale confectionery, will make it to the Mexican list, and it may even prove to be a good source of typically Mexican era foods, as well as imports from the US and UK during that historical period.

http://www.sanborns.com.mx/Paginas/Inicio.aspx

A really interesting historical snippet, as Sanborns survived the Mexican Revolution (Civil War) of 1910...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grupo_Sanborns
Quote
During the Mexican Revolution, troops of Emiliano Zapata used a Sanborns branch located where the Libreria Madero is today, as a rendezvous point and gathering place. Extant photos show Zapatista soldiers enjoying their first restaurant meal at Sanborns' lunch counter.[1] Thus the Sanborns slogan Meet me at Sanborns.

In 1919, Walter Sanborn, tired of Mexico's political turmoil, returned to the US and left the management of the company to his brother Frank.



Waitresses serve food to peasant Zapatista troops sitting behind a makeshift counter at the Sanborns Restaurant in Mexico City, 1914


~~~

It will be somewhat of a challenge as some research needs to be done to pinpoint specific foodstuffs, but I'm so glad I remember these stores from my childhood memories.

This Sanborns in-store brand of chocolates, "Azulejos," may actually make it into the list...
http://www.sanborns.com.mx/Paginas/Producto.aspx?ean=7501006435061

I would NOT be surprised if Liverpool imported Peek Freans into Mexico in the 19th. C.  In fact, I would be rather surprised if they didn't.


« Last Edit: April 26, 2013, 09:52:25 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #629 on: April 19, 2013, 06:21:17 pm »

Lovely - I have found a supplier of suet Kate & Sydney (snake and pygmy) puddings going by the name of 'Goblin'. Simpson Ready Foods have been around since 1910 so don't quite fit even by my lax standards.



Mrs Beeton published a recipe for S&K pudding in the 1870s  so the search is on for a Victorian supplier that is still around.
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« Reply #630 on: April 20, 2013, 09:01:17 pm »

Lovely - I have found a supplier of suet Kate & Sydney (snake and pygmy) puddings going by the name of 'Goblin'. Simpson Ready Foods have been around since 1910 so don't quite fit even by my lax standards.



Mrs Beeton published a recipe for S&K pudding in the 1870s  so the search is on for a Victorian supplier that is still around.


Snake and Pigmy? Sounds macabre but good; like it would go well together with Voodoo Pasta (I made it up but it sounds like New Orleans cuisine to me).
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« Reply #631 on: April 21, 2013, 07:29:49 pm »

AM sooo glad its not just us who call it Snake and Pygmy. Shocked)
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« Reply #632 on: April 22, 2013, 06:52:31 am »

AM sooo glad its not just us who call it Snake and Pygmy. Shocked)


Well my dear Steak and Kidney pie is not necessarily unknown, but it's not typical of the Americas.  And there is no such things as Voodoo Pasta - I made that up - unless there is some tongue in cheek novelty of a dish in some restaurant (it sounds like it could exist somewhere, we got some crazy ones around).

What we DO have is alligator meat in the state of Louisiana
http://www.nola.com/jazzfest/index.ssf/2012/05/alligator_is_all_over_the_new.html
Fried Alligator meat at Mulate's, food of the po' folk
http://www.mulates.com/



Wild West canned meat combo a Amazon's:

Buffalo Au Jus, Elk Au Jus, Smoked Rattlesnake, Alligator Cajun Style
http://www.thefind.com/food/info-alligator-meat
« Last Edit: April 22, 2013, 07:35:36 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #633 on: April 23, 2013, 07:05:21 am »

Today I was reminded:  there's something strangely exiting about eating something that can eat you
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/trending-now/boy-survives-alligator-attack-help-good-samaritan-180607826.html?vp=1
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« Reply #634 on: April 23, 2013, 09:22:41 am »

Who - these days, can honestly say they haven't eaten a pygmy? I know I have...
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« Reply #635 on: April 23, 2013, 09:42:36 am »

Who - these days, can honestly say they haven't eaten a pygmy? I know I have...

I just know that some of the meat at fast food establishments is definitely not beef...
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« Reply #636 on: April 25, 2013, 05:52:15 am »

Who - these days, can honestly say they haven't eaten a pygmy? I know I have...

I just know that some of the meat at fast food establishments is definitely not beef...

Especially the chicken (yes, I know, it tastes like alligator).
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« Reply #637 on: April 25, 2013, 06:00:15 am »

Well I never had a problem with reptile meat.  I just like to know that I'm getting what I'm paid for, you know?
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« Reply #638 on: April 25, 2013, 12:35:19 pm »

I think that is the most important thing... knowing that what it says it is, that it actually is.

I have worked for Mars Pedigree for a while. All the dog food was certified for human consumption but still I didn't really want to eat it. The stuff in some ready meals is no better than the same dog food,  mechanically reclaimed, decontaminated, pulverised and then reconstituted.  Those goblin suet pies tasted as if they were reclaimed meat, no texture, no discernible chunks.

There is a brand of meat pie in the supermarket that guarantees no bone or gristle, the pieces of 'meat' are smooth paste-like cubes. We know how they guarantee no gristle...

A recent find in a supermarket in Iceland found no meat at all in a beef pie.

I don't eat KFC/McD due to the fact that although there may be actual meat 'product' in them, there will always be something else. Antibiotics in the chicken, permitted levels of excrement in the burger. Asparatame and saccharin in all the drinks. Try finding a fizzy drink these days that don't have these substances and note the warnings on all bottles that they cause child behavioural issues. This stuff is maddening...

People are just screaming out for food... just food. It is amazing how the people that produce it go out of the way to feed us stuff that isn't actually food, which brings us neatly back to the sweetened brownian cleaning fluid with fizz that many like to drink... sorry Wink

In the EU we have some qualms over Genetically enhanced products and you won't find these in our food. I always worry about this when I travel to the US. I don't want to eat stuff that men in white coats and laboratories have created - Frankenfood.

Rant over. Apologies.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2013, 12:47:23 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
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« Reply #639 on: April 26, 2013, 04:36:50 am »

What?? You mean you are not a fan of ConAgra foods? *scratches his back with his third arm*
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« Reply #640 on: April 26, 2013, 08:53:50 am »

Ha!
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« Reply #641 on: April 26, 2013, 08:59:29 am »

Talking about brands you can barely eat, here's one for the US list.

Quite tasty but the thing is you don't actually eat it, instead you simply chew - so does it make the list?

Wrigley's spearmint gum - 1893
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #642 on: April 26, 2013, 09:27:49 am »

Talking about brands you can barely eat, here's one for the US list.

Quite tasty but the thing is you don't actually eat it, instead you simply chew - so does it make the list?

Wrigley's spearmint gum - 1893

It already did!  It's on the list.  The number of brand discoveries for the American list is slowing a bit, although I'm not sure I'm close to the end.  The import market has largely been ignored outside of UK products brought into the US.

For Mexico and Japan the progress in forming the lists is tediously slow, mostly because coming across company lists and web-based resources is more difficult. Very hard to pull information even from department stores like Liverpool and Sanborns, but I'm sure in the early stages these companies set the stage for a transition from foreign imports to production of modern domestic goods.  I should look for equivalent stores in Japan.

I do know that those two countries were good markets for US and UK products at the end of the 19th. C., so there is hope the lists can be expanded a bit that way, but because of delayed industrialisation, brands as we know them really didn't proliferate until the Jazz age and beyond (Diesel Era -in SP parlance), then there is a huge explosion of native brands.  This is where you see the difference between the English and non-English speaking parts of the world.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2013, 09:48:19 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #643 on: April 26, 2013, 10:04:19 am »

The European list (UK excluded)

nestles condensed milk (Switzerland 1866)
De Ruijter (Netherlands 1860)
Duvel (Belgium 1871)
Perrier water (France 1898)
Knorr (Germany 1838)
Maggi (Switzerland 1872: A Nestlé brand)
Bertolli (Italy 1865)
Bières de Chimay (Belgium 1863) Trappist Beer
Westmalle (Belgium 1836) Trappist Beer
St Sixtus (Belgium 1838) Trappist Beer
Koningshoeven/La Trappe (Netherlands 1884) Trappist Beer
Spa Water (Belgium sometime in 1600s)
Perrier Water (France 1898)
Devos Lemmens (Belgium 1886) Campbell Soup company.
Honig dried foods (Netherlands 1895) Heinz group
Heineken (Netherlands 1873)

I think I have to look further towards eastern Europe, perhaps Scandinavian country's. Besides the Dutch selling out, there was WWII that probably wiped out a few brands.
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« Reply #644 on: April 26, 2013, 11:23:47 am »

From that list you might start to believe that the European diet was mainly liquid...
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« Reply #645 on: April 28, 2013, 06:18:07 am »

I'm pretty upset tonight (saturday/sunday mid-night).  On Saturday it was my grandfather's 91st. Birthday, and I had planned a surprise for him.  He was the one who told me about the Codd soda bottles still available in Mexico in the early 1920s, so I actually went to a small Japanese market very close to where I live and bought two of those Ramune soda bottles.  The idea was to jog his memory and see if he would remember the bottle from childhood.

The problem is, since I have no car of my own, I couldn't leave with the pickup truck (utility vehicle) I normally borrow from a friend until about 8PM/  I have to drive a good 20 miles to the edge of the city tp a little town called "Dripping Springs" where the nursing home is. Unfortunately we had torrential rains which came from the South (never happens) such that visibility on the road was pretty close to zero.  The windsheild wiper at max did nothing to allow me to drive, and this vehicle is notoriosly bad in rain, because it has zero weight on the rear axle, and the real wheel drum brakes lock before the front wheel disk brakes, so yawing stability in slippery conditions is zero.  I decided to abort the trip.



I'll attempt tomorrow, but rain is predicted again, and I can't borrow the vehicle early during the day.  Angry
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« Reply #646 on: April 28, 2013, 11:30:25 am »

chin up. Per ardua ad astra!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #647 on: April 29, 2013, 06:47:51 am »

chin up. Per ardua ad astra!

I went again today  Grin  He remembered the bottles perfectly! I have made a connection with the past.  He can't walk anymore and is burdened with Dementia, but he's remarkably lucid.  We had a good chat today! We toasted to pineapple flavoured soda and he kept the bottle Grin

As an aside, there were two ladies at Asahi Imports, the small market/store in Austin where I got the bottles.  An older Japanese lady and a young American girl who apparently was well aware of the proper Japanese salutation (I bowed properly - but naturally. both in and out of the store they seemed very happy to bow twice in return - so I got a practical taste of the custom).  The Japanese lady was tickled pink on my manners, the story told about my grandfather, and she knew the history about the Codd Bottle and the Englishman who brought the bottle and the lemonade soda to Japan.  I have a feeling I will be coming back to the market for other items.

Overall, it was a great idea  Cheesy
« Last Edit: April 29, 2013, 10:46:23 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #648 on: April 30, 2013, 10:07:12 pm »

chin up. Per ardua ad astra!


Overall, it was a great idea  Cheesy

Happy to hear that the day went well for all, especially you & your grandfather.
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« Reply #649 on: May 13, 2013, 06:34:53 am »

chin up. Per ardua ad astra!



Overall, it was a great idea  Cheesy


Happy to hear that the day went well for all, especially you & your grandfather.

Thank you Mr. Howard, indeed, well it went!


~~~
Apparently, folks in an apparent mental lapse I forgot another well known brand:  Cracker Jack candied popcorn and peanuts.  It is famous for being tied to the sport of baseball. The Cracker Jack Company was purchased by Borden in 1964 after a bidding war between Borden and Frito-Lay. Borden sold the brand to Frito-Lay in 1997.

Cracker Jack candied popcorn and peanuts (Introduced in 1893 at the Chicago World Columbian Exposition by F.W. Rueckhelm, Chicago, Illinois;  Previously bought by Borden, today the company is owned owned by Frito Lay)

The history goes like this:
Quote
Frederick William Rueckheim—known informally as "Fritz"—and his brother Louis mass-produced an early version of Cracker Jack and sold it at the first Chicago World's Fair in 1893. At the time, it was a mixture of popcorn, molasses, and peanuts and was called "Candied Popcorn and Peanuts".

In 1896, Rueckheim devised a way to keep the popcorn kernels separate. As each batch was mixed in a cement-mixer-like drum, a small quantity of oil was added—a closely guarded trade secret. Before this change, the mixture had been difficult to handle, as it stuck together in chunks. In 1896, the first lot of Cracker Jack was produced. It was named by an enthusiastic sampler who remarked, "That's crackerjack!" (a colloquialism meaning "of excellent quality"[2]).

In 1899, Henry Gottlieb Eckstein developed the "waxed sealed package" for freshness, known then as the "Eckstein Triple Proof Package," a dust-, germ- and moisture-proof paper package. In 1902, the company was reorganized as Rueckheim Bros. & Eckstein.

"Take Me Out to the Ball Game", a song written by lyricist Jack Norworth and composer Albert Von Tilzer, gave Cracker Jack free publicity when it was released in 1908 with the line, "Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack!"

Mascots Sailor Jack and his dog Bingo were introduced in 1918 and registered as a trademark in 1919.[citation needed] Sailor Jack was modeled after Robert Rueckheim, nephew of Frederick and Louis Rueckheim. Robert, the son of a third and eldest Rueckheim brother, Edward, died of pneumonia shortly after his image appeared at the age of 8.[3] The sailor boy image acquired such meaning for the founder of Cracker Jack that he had it carved on his tombstone, which can still be seen in St. Henry's Cemetery in Chicago.[3] Sailor Jack's dog Bingo was based on a real-life dog named Russell, a stray adopted in 1917 by Henry Eckstein who demanded that the dog be used on the packaging.



The updated American List:
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« Last Edit: May 13, 2013, 06:39:08 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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