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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 191676 times)
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #600 on: March 28, 2013, 10:44:07 pm »

You and I both have been there... that funny cupboard with the bottles.
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« Reply #601 on: March 28, 2013, 11:00:34 pm »

Ha! - I think you've been confusing it with Temazepam. You haven't been eating from the secret store again? I've told you before to keep away from that cupboard.

Don't tell me!  Tell Will!  He's the one jumping on cakes!  I think he's sleepwalking sleepjumping!

By the way, the Orange-utang's name is "Julius"*  

*(reference to this name is needed.  Hint:  A business founded in 1926 and popularised in 1970's shopping centres across America)
« Last Edit: March 28, 2013, 11:08:18 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Will Howard
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« Reply #602 on: March 28, 2013, 11:59:21 pm »

Ha! - I think you've been confusing it with Temazepam. You haven't been eating from the secret store again? I've told you before to keep away from that cupboard.

Don't tell me!  Tell Will!  He's the one jumping on cakes!  I think he's sleepwalking sleepjumping!

By the way, the Orange-utang's name is "Julius"*  

*(reference to this name is needed.  Hint:  A business founded in 1926 and popularised in 1970's shopping centres across America)

Love Orange Julius!  Last one I saw was in the Los Angeles area.  And I have better things to do with cakes than jump on them!
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« Reply #603 on: March 29, 2013, 12:04:56 am »

There is a stand alone shop ( Orange Julius ) in Lakeline Mall here in Austin.  You will find it in San Antonio un various malls as well - I think; look for Dairy Queen....   They were purchased by Dairy Queen (hamburger shop chain) in 1987, so you can get it inside any Dairy Queen as well...  Unfortunately their formulation has changed a bit...
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 12:16:19 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #604 on: March 29, 2013, 01:40:26 am »

There is a stand alone shop ( Orange Julius ) in Lakeline Mall here in Austin.  You will find it in San Antonio un various malls as well - I think; look for Dairy Queen....   They were purchased by Dairy Queen (hamburger shop chain) in 1987, so you can get it inside any Dairy Queen as well...  Unfortunately their formulation has changed a bit...

I guess that shows how long it has been since I've wandered aimlessly in a local mall...
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« Reply #605 on: March 29, 2013, 03:13:29 am »

More than 26 years...  In all fairness I haven't stopped at one of those since the mid 70's as a child, but mostly because they largely disappeared in the States (in Mexico they had none) and when I came back around 1987 to California they were nowhere to be found either....  Naturally, since Dairy Queen is more numerous on this side of the country...  now I hear they even have shops in China...

For those of you wondering what we are blabbing about, Dairy Queen is a hamburger (sandwich) chain that specialises in hamburgers and ice cream / frozen milk products.  An unbeatable combination in the hotter parts of this planet. http://www.dairyqueen.com/us-en/Menu/Full-Menu/

« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 03:26:12 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
RJBowman
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« Reply #606 on: March 29, 2013, 05:22:35 am »

Where I live, most of the Dairy Queens are walk-up ice cream stands without hamburgers or dining rooms; most of them are closed in the winter.
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« Reply #607 on: March 29, 2013, 05:26:19 am »

How uncivilised! Normally I have to sit down so I can attack a sundae with gusto after eating my hamburger...  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #608 on: March 29, 2013, 06:13:05 am »

Alright folks:  I have a question for people on both sides of the Atlantic:

I have been trying to relive experiences, and memories of childhood snacks, some of which have been realised and have written about in BG, like for example, Marias/Marie biscuits (a Victorian invention by Peek Freans - maybe will be included in the Mexican list if I discover they were imported before the 1910),



A goat-milk caramel sauce called cajeta,

Image in free domain


mazapan,

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150298012894826&set=pb.47780499825.-2207520000.1364539452&type=3&theater

Some variations on a type of "hyper-fried" ridiculously spicy and quite unhealthy corn chips (http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/takis),



and my latest find "Japanese style peanuts."

These products are very tasty, some were clearly foreign influences in Mexico, and now are relatively unknown outside of Mexico (except the Maries rich teas), very rare in the US until a few years ago... when supermarkets began to cater to the immigrant community.  Some of them, like Mazapan and Cajeta definitely existed before the 20th. C. (hence the relevancy of my question).

However... it is this last one, the "Japanese Style Peanuts" that I remember from childhood and I have found lately at local pharmacies that intrigues me the most.  The reason I ask is to see if anyone recognises this product probably under a different name, because I am not sure whether these peanuts indeed have anything to do with Japan, or Asia, for that matter.  If not Japan, perhaps some stores in London may have something that is similar from other parts of the world, such as the Middle East or China...

The peanuts I refer to are regular peanuts that have been dipped in a soy-based batter, and then deep fried (I found otherwise), such that each kernel develops a thin quite-hard shell around it.  Think of them as the ancient savoury version of Peanut M&M's.  




Now it seems no one knows where this peanut confection came from (don't let the "Nishikawa" brand fool you), and in fact many people attest that this style of peanuts is more Mexican than chile-peppers rather than a culinary import.  Have you seen anything like it?

By the way, these things are insanely good, if you can find fresh, NON-STALE packages (Mr. Bowman - be careful with stale products...)
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 10:08:08 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #609 on: March 29, 2013, 06:53:44 am »

Oh my God.  The Google mindless oracle may have answered my question! Sorry folks!  Not Victorian but here it goes (maybe Diesel Era... yeah... that my excuse!  Oh well, whenever we get a Dieselpunk Food list).

There is a newspaper article from "El Universal" (a major news outfit in Mexico) which explains that a Japanese immigrant in Mexico City (and yes, I knew a few Japanese immigrants myself in High School) invented these "Japanese style" peanuts.  So they are Japanese- Mexican in a way.  According to this article,  Yoshigei Nakatani, who lived in the food market district of "La Merced" in Mexico City in 1945, came up with the confection and sold them on a wholesale basis to other stores in the market.  The company was founded and simply named, "Nipón."  The family business is unable to sell their products in a retail structure and prefer to manufacture for other brands, apparently citing competition costs from brands such as "Sabritas" (maker of Frito Lay snack clones). Today the company is headed by Nakatani's grand-daugher, Chieko Nakatani (I should read Nakatani Chieko in Japanese convention) along with a cousin and an aunt.

http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/finanzas/53292.html



And somebody at Wordpress has a recipe for these things!  They take 1 hour 45 min to develop the hard shell (!)  They are not fried, but rather you are making a boiled syrup on an open bowl that will harden like caramel due to the extreme temperature that caramel can reach, except you are mixing flour.  Basically a mixture of soy sauce, wheat flour and sugar (sweet and salty at the same time).  Finally a savoury coating of salt, soy sauce, sugar and spices is added at the end when still hot (glazing).

 http://entertothematrix.wordpress.com/2008/09/08/cacahuates-japoneses/

PS: See? It was not my imagination!  Orange for Orangutangs!

http://www.prlog.org/10406601-orange-for-orangutans.jpg
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 09:44:26 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #610 on: March 31, 2013, 04:59:51 am »

By the way, I happen to know that orangeutangs like a sip of Grand Marnier every now an then...

We don't have a French list, but this would be for the Eurpean list (I know, I know - dar too many liquors and alcoholic beverages... anyhow good excuse to bump the thread)

Wiki:

Grand Marnier Liqueur (The Grand Marnier-Lapostelle distillery started with the orange liqueur of the same name, and  was founded in 1880 by Alexandre Marnier-Lapostolle, Paris France).

Quote

Grand Marnier

Cordon Rouge is an orange-flavored brandy liqueur created in 1880 by Alexandre Marnier-Lapostolle. It is made from a blend of Cognac brandy, distilled essence of bitter orange, and sugar. Grand Marnier Cordon Rouge is 40% alcohol (70 Proof in UK, 80 Proof in US). Aside from Cordon Rouge, the Grand Marnier line includes other liqueurs, most of which can be consumed "neat" as a cordial or a digestif, and can be used in mixed drinks and desserts. In France this kind of use is the most popular, especially with Crêpes Suzette and "crêpes au Grand Marnier". César Ritz reportedly came up with the name "Grand Marnier" for Marnier-Lapostolle, who in return helped him purchase and establish the Hotel Ritz Paris.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2013, 05:09:10 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #611 on: March 31, 2013, 05:54:15 am »

This thread is making me incredibly hungry.
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« Reply #612 on: March 31, 2013, 07:39:20 am »

This thread is making me incredibly hungry.


Indeed Captain Stockings!  This thread is responsible for me spending more money than I should on sundry food stuffs!


~

Folks:  I just found another treasure trove for the Mexican list - which so badly needs it.

There is this food company list that has links to many corporations, and while the majority got their start during the "Diesel" era, some companies do date back to the 19th. C. and thankfully they are not limited to candies or snacks:

http://www.mexicoweb.com.mx/Empresas/Alimentos_y_Bebidas/

The list is very long, and the title of each company is linked to the corporate websites whenever possible.  The number of websites is staggering and it goes to show you what IT does for industry even in parts of the world we would stereo-typify as "backwards."

The first company I found is a coffee company by the name of Cafe Galilea (obviously a Biblical reference).  There is very little historical material on this one (their website is not the best), but it is known that the brand has been running continuously since 1893 in the city of Tuxtla Gutiérrez, in the State of Chiapas (southernmost state, it borders the country of Guatemala), and sold throughout the south of Mexico, where the Classic Maya period unfolded so long ago.  Not surprising that a coffee company would also be one of the oldest, since that was one of the earliest Mexican exports. So here it goes:

Café Galilea (Purveyor of whole and ground coffee. Founded in 1893, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, México).

Also  I know we have stated that liquors would not enter the list, but I just found this website with the history of one company and it turns out this company had to be included in both, American and Mexican lists...

So before I forget, I have to include "Tequila Sauza" a company founded in the arid town of Tequila (yes that is where the name came from) in the state of Jalisco.  In 1858 an agave-plant farmer by the name of Senobio Sauza arrived in the town of Tequila looking for a job.  After only 15 years of working in the agave and tequila industry, by 1873, he saved enough money to buy his own distillery, which he called "La Perseverancia" (Perseverance).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sauza_Tequila

Knowing that he was sitting on a gold mine, he decided to start exporting his tequila right form the start, so this brand also has to be included in the American list!

Tequila Sauza (Founded in 1873, by Senobio Sauza, Town of Tequila, Jalisco, México)


~~~

Some companies are rather cryptic;  this chocolate brand, La Nueva Colonial  ("The New Colonial") in Mexico City, has a very fancy website and claims to have been founded in 1910, which would qualify it for entry in the list.  But I'm  hesitant to do so, because there is vitually no history other than the dry claim of 1910...  http://www.lncc.com.mx/

For example, other companies like Chocolates Turin (founded by Italian immigrants in Mexico City), are far bigger and better known and have a clear history, but date back to the Diesel era (1928 http://www.chocolatesturin.com.mx/ ), and so they are out of the list.

I find it frustrating when someone makes a "claim of pedigree" and then they don't give you what 99% of all companies do, which is a brief history of their founding... that makes me suspicious.

« Last Edit: March 31, 2013, 09:41:55 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #613 on: April 07, 2013, 09:44:26 am »

I found a genuine Victorian Era chocolatier from Mexico in the company list I wrote above.

This company I do remember from childhood, so it's a famous brand name.  What I didn't know is that the brand "La Suiza" (The Swiss [lady]), dates back to 1896.  The official website is sketchy at best, apparently because they belong now to a large confectioner conglomerate who also has the license for Lady Godiva chocolates in that country:

http://grupopando.com/suiza/index.html  (very nice logo).

So the first-hand history I can give you is sketchy at best; HOWEVER, I did find the picture of an original early 20th C. tin of La Suiza.  Apparently it was owned, and may have been started by Italian brothers (surprise, surprise, that makes 3 Italian families somehow involved in the production of sweets in Mexico City - El Globo pastries, Chocolates Turin, and Chocolates La Suiza -all very big companies now):

http://elmodo.mx/kiosko/images/jpgs_560x560/01201-01400/01263A.jpg

According to the Art Noveau decorated tin, the name of the factory back then was Dulces y Chocolates Lodigiani Hnos. SA de CV.  That is, " Lodigiani Bros. Candies and Chococlates, 8th Degollado St. #196, Mexico City, Post Code 555. Telephone Number: 1598"

So if I take these to be the original makers, I can write:

Chocolates La Suiza (Originally made by Dulces y Chocolates Lodigiani Hnos. SA de CV. and now part of the large confectioner conglomerate Grupo Pando.  Founded in 1896 by the Lodigiani Brothers, Mexico City, Mexico).

By the way part of my family is Italian in origin as well - my maternal great grandfather's side, from Northern Italy -dating to the same period in Mexico... apparently waves of European migrants. often wealthy migrants at that (!), in the last decade of the 19th. C.

« Last Edit: April 07, 2013, 10:20:27 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
mephit
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« Reply #614 on: April 11, 2013, 04:34:06 am »

Here's one for the Japanese list that's also still sold (as it has been since it's introduction) in Codd bottles. Ramuné. The original lemon-lime flavor introduced in Japan no later than 1884 is still sold today. Incidentally, the name is a phonetic corruption of the English word lemonade. Ramuné was introduced to the Japanese market by Alexander Cameron Sim, a prominent expat Scottish businessman who lived in Kobe from 1870 until his death of typhoid in 1900. Sim started out importing medicinals but found real success with his "mabu soda" or marble soda.  Unfortunately, I don't think Ramuné was introduced to either the Americas or Europe until the 1980s, so no chance of adding it to those lists.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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« Reply #615 on: April 11, 2013, 05:25:32 am »

Here's one for the Japanese list that's also still sold (as it has been since it's introduction) in Codd bottles. Ramuné. The original lemon-lime flavor introduced in Japan no later than 1884 is still sold today. Incidentally, the name is a phonetic corruption of the English word lemonade. Ramuné was introduced to the Japanese market by Alexander Cameron Sim, a prominent expat Scottish businessman who lived in Kobe from 1870 until his death of typhoid in 1900. Sim started out importing medicinals but found real success with his "mabu soda" or marble soda.  Unfortunately, I don't think Ramuné was introduced to either the Americas or Europe until the 1980s, so no chance of adding it to those lists.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)


Arigatou, Mephit San! Very interesting, and to think that the Codd "marble" type bottles are still being made today!!  Consider it added!  (fixed the picture in the spoiler - the html page is deceptively terminated in "jpg" you have to click on the picture again to see the real URL for the figure)

Ramune lemon-lime flavoured "marble" soda (Introduced to Japan in 1876 by Scott businessman Alexander Cameron Sim - Kobe, Japan.  Now produced by Japan Sangaria Beverage Co., Ltd., in Osaka)

Image 2007 (CC) Creative Commons License, by katorisi


EDIT:  I found  a video on how to open a (modern) Codd bottle:
Japanese Ramune Soda How to Open?




A favourite probably for the Cherry Blossom-watching festivals in Japan.  Sadly, global warming has conspired to accelerate the sakura zensen (cherry blossom front) to the month of March instead of April, resulting in a poor showing.  However here in the United States, our 3,020 cherry blossom trees in Washington DC, a gift by Japan to the United States in 1912 have bloomed magnificently in April:

http://www.nbcwashington.com/brchannel/197846071.html
Photography by Ryan Dunn (no relation of mine)
« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 07:45:01 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #616 on: April 11, 2013, 08:05:03 am »

Hendersons Relish ' produced in Sheffield for over 100 years' (as the website proudly states).
Began in the late 19th century, but only become known outside Yorkshire in the last 20 years or so.



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« Reply #617 on: April 11, 2013, 07:38:26 pm »

Hendersons Relish ' produced in Sheffield for over 100 years' (as the website proudly states).
Began in the late 19th century, but only become known outside Yorkshire in the last 20 years or so.




From the company website:
http://www.hendersonsrelish.com/history.htm
Quote
It was Mr Henry Henderson who first began manufacturing his own special type of sauce back in the late part of the 19th century. Originally manufactured at 35 Broad Lane in Sheffield, Henderson’s Relish is still being made and has been in uninterrupted production within half a mile of the site from which the first bottle was filled.

The company was bought by Shaws of Huddersfield in 1910 who, incidentally, still supply Hendersons with vinegar. In 1940 Mr Charles Hinksman formed the present company of Hendersons (Sheffield) Ltd. the control of which has remained with the family. Dr Kenneth Freeman, the nephew of the late Charles Hinksman, became the Managing Director and Chairman in 1991 and has overseen many important changes in the company’s profile.

Previously unkown outside of Sheffield, Hendersons appeal is now spreading further and further afield with an increasing number of supermarket listings and a thriving mail order service. There is also the opportunity to purchase Hendersons Merchandise which includes
t-shirts, aprons and gift boxes.



Thank you Lady Mae!  I'm not sure if the curator of the UK list, yereverluvinunclebert has included  Hendersons Relish already (it rings a bell in my mind), but in any case I think that I need to pass this information to Uncle Bert.  I haven't heard from Uncle Bert in along time.  I hope everything is alright...

-I cant find an exact date for introduction of the product.  All we have is the Made over 100 yrs. mark
-The founder is Mr. Henry Henderson, of Sheffield



« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 07:41:15 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #618 on: April 12, 2013, 02:31:51 am »

I'm still here, a tadge busy fixing two cars, a motorbike and 5 pushbikes + wife + kids x 3
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« Reply #619 on: April 12, 2013, 02:33:18 am »

Arigatou, Mephit San! Very interesting, and to think that the Codd "marble" type bottles are still being made today!!  Consider it added!  (fixed the picture in the spoiler - the html page is deceptively terminated in "jpg" you have to click on the picture again to see the real URL for the figure)

Ramune lemon-lime flavoured "marble" soda (Introduced to Japan in 1876 by Scott businessman Alexander Cameron Sim - Kobe, Japan.  Now produced by Japan Sangaria Beverage Co., Ltd., in Osaka)

You're most welcome sir! My apologies for the picture link. It worked when I previewed the post, though I'm not sure why. As to Ramuné's date of introduction, I found conflicting information so I went with the latest date I could find. Sangaria's website claims it was introduced in Nagasaki by a Japanese businessman named Hannbee Fujise in 1865 and that they went to Codd bottles in 1888. Everything else I've been able to find suggests that Sim was the businessman and the introduction was in Kobe, but I find dates of both 1876 and 1884 for that intro. The reports that Sim was the originator also imply the Codd bottles were used from the beginning because he was importing them from Britain.
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« Reply #620 on: April 12, 2013, 03:00:32 am »

I'm still here, a tadge busy fixing two cars, a motorbike and 5 pushbikes + wife + kids x 3

You're fixing the wife and kids too?  What's wrong with them?!?  I can lend you my mechanic's tool set and amateur surgical kit...
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« Reply #621 on: April 12, 2013, 03:04:30 am »

Hendersons Relish ' produced in Sheffield for over 100 years' (as the website proudly states).
Began in the late 19th century, but only become known outside Yorkshire in the last 20 years or so.

A variant of Worcestershire sauce?
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« Reply #622 on: April 12, 2013, 03:23:01 am »

Hendersons Relish ' produced in Sheffield for over 100 years' (as the website proudly states).
Began in the late 19th century, but only become known outside Yorkshire in the last 20 years or so.

A variant of Worcestershire sauce?

Apparently, but without the anchovies
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« Reply #623 on: April 12, 2013, 08:31:27 pm »

Then it would be tamarind and vinegar, and not much else.
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« Reply #624 on: April 14, 2013, 02:31:05 am »

I think that Japanese peanut snack might be called 'arare' --  they have it here in Hawaii, along with many other strange and wonderful children's treats like dried octopus.
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