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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 191672 times)
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #575 on: March 22, 2013, 11:54:23 am »

How does it taste?
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« Reply #576 on: March 22, 2013, 06:09:31 pm »

 It very much reminds me of Nestle Quick hot-cocoa powder.  It is like a hard taffy (actually a form of treacle) in consistency and very sticky.  It can be rather hard to start chewing, specially when cold, but will readily dissolve in the mouth if left alone long enough so you have the choice of chewing or letting it dissolve....  It is available in the UK.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2013, 06:12:06 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #577 on: March 22, 2013, 07:24:20 pm »

Tootsie Roll is similar to taffy, and is usually hard, but I think that this depends on how recently it was manufactured. It has an incredibly long shelf life, and on the hundredth anniversary of the product, I saw an interview with the president of the Tootsie Roll company, who offered 100-year old Tootsie Rolls to the interviewer. The interviewer declined, but the executive ate one, and claimed that it still tasted good.

The interview was accompanied by video of the factory equipment, including a machine that spewed a massive flow of hot, viscous Tootsie Roll candy, like Wonka's waterfall in super slow motion.
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« Reply #578 on: March 22, 2013, 07:51:04 pm »

Wiki:

Quote
Ingredients

The current U.S. ingredients of a chocolate Tootsie Roll are: sugar, corn syrup, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, condensed skim milk, cocoa, whey, soya lecithin, and natural and artificial flavors.[7]

In 2009, Tootsie Rolls became certified kosher by the Orthodox Union.[8]
Alternate flavors

In addition to the traditional cocoa-flavored Tootsie Roll, several additional flavors have been introduced. Known as Tootsie Fruit Rolls, flavors include cherry, orange, vanilla, lemon, and lime. These varieties are wrapped in red, orange, blue, yellow and green wrappers, respectively. Tootsie Frooties come in numerous different fruit flavors including red strawberry, blue raspberry, grape, green apple, banana-berry, smooth cherry, fruit punch, pink lemonade, root beer, cran blueberry and watermelon.
In other countries

Tootsie Rolls have been introduced to Canada, Mexico, Ireland, Aruba, United Kingdom, Portugal, Spain, France, Italy, Indonesia, Philippines, South Korea, Panama , Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Denmark, Norway, Singapore, Sweden, Finland, Austria, Australia, and New Zealand.

If exported early enough, Tootsie Rolls may make it to the Mexican, Canadian and even UK lists!!
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #579 on: March 22, 2013, 08:02:33 pm »

I can say only two things in response, I have never heard of this roll before in connection with the UK and as an avid sweetie-eater I am sure I would have come across it before if it had penetrated these shores. Secondly, taffy is not something that has come here either, I hadn't even heard the word prior to watching the recent Charlie and the chocolate factory film (and I used to work in the factory...)
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« Reply #580 on: March 22, 2013, 08:13:37 pm »

Well go find it then!  You have a mystery to solve!  (BTW Toosie Roll never, ever,  goes by the name of "taffy") For Canada and Mexico it looks this would have been an early export from the US, as candies and non perishables were the first to be exported for obvious reasons.  In most of those countries listed above, however, the Tootsie Roll most likely came with the American troops as part of their standard rations.  Hop in your time machine, look for it around WWI, WWII  and other conflict eras E.g. It looks it did not catch in Japan, but it did in South Korea...


It could be these only exist as (recent?) speciality imports - the trick is finding out when they were introduced...
http://tootsie-roll.co.uk/
« Last Edit: March 22, 2013, 08:23:32 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #581 on: March 22, 2013, 08:25:47 pm »

On Taffy and Toffee....

There is a strange connection between American Taffee and English Toffee.  It may have originated in America first and then evolved and transformed over time...

Wiki:

Quote
Taffy

In the early 1800’s was the beginning of Taffy. There was no one person given credit for this discovery. It was called treacle a form of sugar or syrup based on either cane or molasses. It was thickened by boiling and made into hard cakes originally. It started to become popular by 1840 when making taffy was turned into a social event called taffy pulls. By 1880 its popularity had spread from the midwest to the Atlantic City boardwalk. By 1883 taffy was vended at traveling fairs and individually wrapped and packaged in small bags and sold along the east coast.[1]

Taffy or chews, is a type of chewy candy, similar to toffee. Taffy is often sold alongside bubblegum and candy. Taffy is made by stretching or pulling a sticky mass of boiled sugar, butter or vegetable oil, flavorings, and coloring until fluffy. When this process is complete, the taffy is rolled, cut into small pastel-coloured pieces and wrapped in wax paper to keep it soft. It usually has a fruity flavor, but other flavors are common as well, including molasses and the classic unflavored taffy.

Salt water taffy was a noted invention of Atlantic City, New Jersey, and became a common souvenir of many coastal resort towns. Modern commercial taffy is made primarily from corn syrup, glycerin and butter. The pulling process, which makes the candy lighter and chewier, consists of stretching out the mixture, folding it over and stretching it out again. Although it is called "salt water" taffy, it does not include any salt water in its manufacture at all. In the nearby Philadelphia regional dialect, the term "taffy" without "salt water" before it often refers to a lollypop or sucker.[2]

In the United Kingdom, taffy candies are called chews. They are shaped pieces of candy very similar to soft toffee but without the caramel flavouring, and can be found in the form of popular brands such as Chewits or Starburst and Laffy Taffy.

Caramel candies are sometimes referred to as taffy (taffy apples), but are very different from common salt water taffy.



Quote

Toffee

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Toffee is a confection made by caramelizing sugar or molasses (creating inverted sugar) along with butter, and occasionally flour. The mixture is heated until its temperature reaches the hard crack stage of 300 to 310 °F (149 to 154 °C). While being prepared, toffee is sometimes mixed with nuts or raisins.

The process of making toffee requires the boiling of ingredients until the mix is stiff enough to be pulled into a shape which holds and has a glossy surface. The resulting mixture will typically be poured into a shallow tray and allowed to cool to form a sheet. Different mixes, processes, and most importantly, temperatures, will result in different textures and hardnesses, from soft and often sticky to a hard, brittle material.

A popular variant in the US is English toffee, which is a very buttery toffee often made with almonds. It is available in both chewy and hard versions. Heath bars are a type of candy made with an English toffee core. Although named English toffee it bears little resemblance[citation needed] to the wide range of confectionery known as toffee currently available in the UK.

Another variant is honeycomb toffee, which is an aerated version with bubbles introduced by adding baking soda and vinegar while mixing. These react to form carbon dioxide, which is trapped in the highly viscous mixture. In the UK and Canada, the most well known honeycomb candy is the Crunchie bar. The Australian equivalent is the Violet Crumble bar. In New Zealand, this is called hokey pokey.

A particular application of toffee is in toffee apples, which are apples on sticks which are coated with toffee. Toffee apples are similar to taffy apples and caramel apples, which are both names for apples covered in caramel.

In the UK, toffee apples, sometimes called candy apples, are coated with brittle candy similar to boiled sweets.

Toffee used in confectionery can be mixed with many different ingredients to produce a variety of flavors: rum & butter, chocolate covered, vanilla & chocolate, rum & raisin, raspberry, and honeycomb.
Etymology

The origins of the word are unknown. Food writer Harold McGee claims it to be "from the Creole for a mixture of sugar and molasses", but which creole language isn't specified.[1] The Oxford English Dictionary dates the first publication of the word to 1825 and identifies it as a variation of taffy (1817), both of which are first recorded as English dialectical words.[2][3]


Walker's Nonsuch Toffee was actually sold since the 19th. C, but the company has no exact founding date - you may be able to find out - maybe it can make it to the UK list)
http://www.walkers-nonsuch.co.uk/
http://www.walkers-nonsuch.co.uk/the-team/walker%27s-history

Image Creative Commons from Wiki
« Last Edit: March 22, 2013, 09:12:37 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #582 on: March 22, 2013, 09:35:15 pm »

Oh, yes, I know toffee of course and now you have described it, I recognise taffy too, we just don't seem to name it as such here other than to call the creations 'chews'. It existed in opal fruits (starburst), opal mints then pacers (both now defunct) and licquorice black jacks amongst other sweets. Strange that we don't explicitly name it 'taffy' but perhaps the name just didn't catch on over here. Thanks for the description.

Walkers toffees are a favourite of mine.

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« Reply #583 on: March 24, 2013, 08:32:07 am »

The Mexican list is about to receive a number of names for candy and confectioner companies, thanks to this Wiki entry on the History of Mexican Candy, that I found written in Spanish:

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dulce_mexicano

The list is not tremendously long, but it's rich in names of candy makers, confectioners and bakers, who still produce traditional Mexican candies as well as European candies, dating back to that period between the declaration of independence from Spain and their civil war, when Mexico received so much influence from Continental Europe.

Some of these candies, confections and pastries that may be listed you have never heard of, and some will be recognised as relatives of European candies and pastries such as Cannoli, and Marzipan as well as the Mexican equivalent of the Croissant (I have written about that before).

I need time to go through the list, and sift through the items, as it is a bit of work...

Some names of confectioners who may still be open today (I recognise a few of those already as definitely being extant as far as the mid 1980's when I was living there).  Some of them are definitely major brands to be found in supermarket chain stores (e.g. Usher, Lady Baltimore -note the English names), while others may not make it to the list if they prove to be too "isolated" or just simple "mom and pop" shops - it's a judgement call, sort of like with Cafe Du Monde in New Orleans).

La Gran Fama (1882 City of Puebla) http://www.lagranfama.com/
La Concha, La Norma, El Vapor, La Cubana, La Flor de Tabasco, La Cibelina, Lady Baltimore, (from late century in Mexico City).  
Minerva (Late Century, City of Durango)
El Néctar, Las Delicias, La Marina y La Gran Fábrica Yucateca de Chocolates. (State of Yucatán circa 1894)
Mimí, Usher (maker of mints, similar to Altoids - still extant, 1902, Central Mexico)


~~~
EDIT:

News and Errata March 25:  It's turning out many of these names in the list I gave above are no longer extant and some have date errors.  Mimi is not a Victorian Era company, but a brand that Usher used to sell milk-based candies in the 1920's.  Besides Usher (clearly extant and widely available -see entry below), it's looking like the only other viable brand is La Gran Fama and I'm still trying to determine how wide-spread their products are...
« Last Edit: March 27, 2013, 07:08:43 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
RJBowman
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« Reply #584 on: March 24, 2013, 03:51:05 pm »

Here, on a website that sells candy, is a history of early American candy brands:
http://www.candyfavorites.com/shop/history-american-candy.php
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« Reply #585 on: March 24, 2013, 06:23:19 pm »

Here, on a website that sells candy, is a history of early American candy brands:
http://www.candyfavorites.com/shop/history-american-candy.php


Much obliged Mr. Bowman.  Another treasure trove of names.

More brands will be added to the American list. I have already included Hershey's, Tootsie Rolls and Wrigley's but I have not have included Doscher’s Candies, Thompson Chocolate,  Piedmont (Red Bird Peppermint puffs) and Richardson Pastel Mints.  I also think Whitman's Chocolate (1842) is missing
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« Reply #586 on: March 26, 2013, 08:08:36 am »

A very interesting discussion on antique soda bottles just came up per chance, and though it's be interesting to reproduce the discussion here, so I'll just cut and paste:

Minor gah all things considered:

Couldn't find my corkscrew, popped the cork INTO the bottle of wine (it's only a $20 bottle, nothing really fancy-local brand, Blackberry Wine-very nice, actually), and as there's no real way to REcork the bottle, well...  You do the math.

Now, why is that a gah?

Suffice to say that it's 1:07 in the AMs here, I get up in five and a quarter hours, and I work tomorrow.

I'm going to level, and them what's played D&D with me can attest to it-I can hold liquor quite well.  Two Quarts EASY before I'm feeling buzzed, but still, it's always a shame to crush a bottle without savoring it, know what I mean?  That's what cheap 80 proof is for.  $20 Dessert Wine is for enjoying.


Reminds me of what my grandfather used to say about his childhood experience with soda bottles. He was born (he's still alive) in 1922.  In the 1920's in Mexico City, you could still find older technology mixed in with the new; Ford Model T cars and every now again some horse drawn carriages (like for stores, businesses - mortuaries -yes!!! mortuary carriages!!) Anyway, the bottle cap was already in use, but not all bottlers had it.  He still remembers seeing glass bottles which were made with a glass marble as a cap of sorts.  The marble was inside the bottle and the gas pressure would keep it in place!  You would have to press the dirty marble into the soda (losing half of the soda, now all over your face and clothes), in order to drink!

*snip*
Codswallop I say!


*snip*
[Expletive] man, nowadays, people pay high dollar for that kind of [mild expletive], cause it's a "Novelty" or somesuch sillybuggers as that.

Hell, I dropped like $2 on it myself for an 8oz soda, because I thought "Hey, it's a soda NOT being sold in a gas station!  It's GOT to be good!" yeah, I was totally wrong.  Tasted like fizzy sugar water.

But the concept was there-a marble you press in with some sort of little "Included" cap, and you have to hold the bottle a certain way to drink it, or the damn marble blocks the flow of the overpriced sugar water.

Never again will I be suckered into such...  how'd SoT put it?  Codswallop?  Something 'long those lines.

Anyway, I'm 2/3rds into my third bottle of wine right now.  No sign of slowing down, either.

I would like to state at this point I've switched to the $6/bottle stuff.  Who cares about flavor?  I'm trying to black out at this point, as there's no other way I'm actually going to sleep.

For them what care of such things, I DID learn a new song on guitar:  "As Bad as This," written by John Curulewski (I THINK I spelled that right), and off of the Styx Album "Serpent is Rising."  It's a really damn simple song, only E, Em, D, A, and figure out the order they're playing it in.

The trick comes in on the finger picking bits while you're trying to sing.

Could be the alcohol, but my wife seems to think I'm spot [expletive] on.

Who knows?  Who cares?  For me?  C'est La Vie.  (that's an ELP reference, for all you young whippersnappers)


No sir! Not codswallop, but physics!  Hiram Codd physics, to be precise!

It may be a type of Codd or  Hutchinson Soda Bottle; the former had the marble and the latter had a ruibber gasket stopper indide the bottle and an hourglass shaped wire.  The pressure would hold the gasket inside the bottle, and it was exceedingly hard to pull the gasket out of the bottle, as it was meant to be pushed into the bottle, with the wire keeping the cap from falling to the bottom of the bottle...

http://www.sha.org/bottle/soda.htm

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Hiram Codd's Soda Bottle (1873)




http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiram_Codd


Quote
Invention of the Codd bottle

In 1862 he brought out a patent for measuring the flow of liquids and in 1870 devised a patented bottling machine.

To understand the mineral water trade better and to prove the worth of his invention he experimented at a small mineral water works in the Caledonian Road, Islington, in London. A letters patent issued to him in November 1870 stated he was a soda water manufacturer living at 6 Park Place, Islington.

Frederick Foster and William Brooke became early backers. In 1872 he was introduced to Richard Barrett, of London, whose two sons owned the Malvern Mineral Water Co. at Grove Lane, Camberwell. Barrett became Codd's partner. This enabled Codd to continue his research into the globe-stopper idea and in particular the tool used to form the groove in the lip of the bottle and in 1873 he perfected his globe-stoppered bottle.
A Codd bottle.

Mineral water soda manufacturers who wanted to use Codd's Globe Stopper bottles had to pay a yearly fee for a licence to use his patent bottle. By mid 1873 he had granted 20 licenses and received a further 50 applications. This was boosted further by a Trade Show held in London in the same year. By 1874 the licence was free to bottle manufacturers as long as they purchased the marbles, sealing rings and used his groove tool, and the mineral water firms they traded with had already bought a license to use his bottle. Codd had two factories in London solely producing marbles, one in Kennington and the other in Camberwell, which was run by F. Barrett, the son of his financial backer.

« Last Edit: March 26, 2013, 08:20:00 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #587 on: March 26, 2013, 11:51:31 am »

Quite a few of my marbles in my collection (now my children's) come from this source.
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« Reply #588 on: March 27, 2013, 08:13:36 am »

The first and most obvious company that qualifies for the Mexican list is Usher, a confection company specialising in mints available en-mass around all supermarkets, petrol stations, restaurants and businesses of all kinds.  They carry the tradition of printing proverbs on the wrappers of mint rolls and individually wrapped mints.

The company was founded in 1902 by Leopoldo España-del-Castillo y José María del-Río-Usher (Notice the use of hyphens to indicate surname - Spanish surnames are compound names from both paternal and maternal family names).  They started by making "English Mint" and "Spearmint" drops, which are still sold today, albeit the shape of the tablets is different nowadays (round flat and concave tablets with a Fleur-de-Lis relief, circa 1987 if memory serves me right).  In 1928, the company diversified and started selling milk-based candies under the name "Mimi."

Usher English Mint and Spearmint Drops (Founded 1902 by Leopoldo España-del-Castillo y José María del-Río-Usher, Mexico City, Mexico)

http://www.usher.com.mx/?mod=staticCont&smod=emphis&&



EDIT:
It's turning out many of these names in the list I gave a couple of posts above are no longer extant and some have date errors.  Mimi is not a Victorian Era company, but a brand that Usher used to sell milk-based candies in the 1920's.  Besides Usher (clearly extant and widely available), it's looking like the only other viable brand is La Gran Fama and I'm still trying to determine how wide-spread their products are...


Sadly, not even the "Great Yucatec Chocolate Factory" made it to the list...  There is a historical archive about it though (includes some pictures from the early 1900's):

http://www.bibliotecavirtualdeyucatan.com.mx/archivos/revistas/revistasWeb/Revista_De_La_Revolucion_En_Yucatan/ano1_numero4_septiembre_2009/sociales/sociales_7.html




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« Reply #589 on: March 28, 2013, 06:17:57 am »

I can start adding 3 of the American companies handed down in Mr. Bowman's list:

Thompson Chocolate (Primarily a maker of novelty foil-wrapped chocolates, Thompson Chocolate was founded in 1878 by William H. Thompson in Meriden, Connecticut.  Today, the parent company also produces nutritional suppliments under the name Adora)

~~~

Piedmont / Redbird is a brand that has already been included.

~~~

Doscher's French Chew Taffy

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Doscher's French Chew Taffy (Founded 1871 by Claus Doscher, a German immigrant in Cincinnati, Ohio)

~~~
Richardson Mints (1893) and Dryden & Palmer Rock Candy (1880) (Richardson Brands was founded in 1893 by Thomas D Richardson and his two sons, after some time spent selling their signature product, soft "pillow" mints at the counter of a department store in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  In 1929 the company moved to Canajoharie, New York).

~~~

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« Reply #590 on: March 28, 2013, 06:36:58 am »

The jury's still out on the issue of La Gran Fama (1882 City of Puebla), as I'd hate to lose this confectionary company due to the historical significance (pre-industrial confections from the Victorian Era) and the unique merging of native + European products from the 19th. C. which you will see nowhere outside of Mexico...

http://www.lagranfama.com/

Gaznate <=> a type of Cannoli
http://www.lagranfama.com/modules/mod_news_pro_gk4/cache/stories.gaznatensp_87.jpg

Muegano <=> Deep fried pastry - somewhat similar to New Orleans' Beignet pastries
http://www.lagranfama.com/modules/mod_news_pro_gk4/cache/stories.18nsp_87.jpg

Mazapan <=> similar to Marzipan, except that Mazapan is made with peanut paste , instead of almond paste

Also on the native side there is Camote, (candied sweet potato) !!
http://www.lagranfama.com/modules/mod_news_pro_gk4/cache/stories.11nsp_88.jpg


« Last Edit: March 28, 2013, 07:04:36 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #591 on: March 28, 2013, 05:22:32 pm »

Mazapan <=> similar to Marzipan, except that Mazapan is made with peanut paste , instead of almond paste

Nasty stuff. But the stuff I sampled was from the ethnic food isle at the supermarket, and was possibly stale. Made fresh it might be much better.
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« Reply #592 on: March 28, 2013, 05:32:44 pm »

With all imports you have to be very careful with expiration dates...  no matter what the source is, because the supermarket may have had it stored for years in a warm damp backroom for all you know...

The most common brand in Mexico is "de la Rosa" http://www.obsessivesweets.com/2011/02/de-la-rosa-peanut-mazapan-candy.html  I don't think a freshness date is stamped on their packages (then again, the last time I had one was in the mid 1980's!).
« Last Edit: March 28, 2013, 05:36:53 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #593 on: March 28, 2013, 07:27:32 pm »

What is yellow and swings from cake to cake? - Tarzipan (or a meringue-utang)
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« Reply #594 on: March 28, 2013, 07:39:14 pm »

What is yellow and swings from cake to cake? - Tarzipan (or a meringue-utang)

Ooow.  Eoooow! *rolls on the floor in pain*  Aooooow!

What does a meringueutang looks like?  Grin
« Last Edit: March 28, 2013, 07:54:34 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #595 on: March 28, 2013, 08:02:47 pm »

More important perhaps, is how does it taste? (Don't say with its tongue.)
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« Reply #596 on: March 28, 2013, 08:09:03 pm »

More important perhaps, is how does it taste? (Don't say with its tongue.)

Are we getting into a sticky situation here?
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« Reply #597 on: March 28, 2013, 08:20:37 pm »

More important perhaps, is how does it taste? (Don't say with its tongue.)

I propose of oranges given the natural colour (orange-red-brown of the orangutang)... egg whites, sugar and an acid are required.. use orange juice I'd say.  Close cousin to the Orange-utang.

*snip*
Are we getting into a sticky situation here?

Only if you try to catch it while jumping from one cake to another cake...

EDIT:  I don't recommend that you jump from cake to cake.  Confectioner stores and bakeries generally don't accept that sort of behaviour from their customers...
« Last Edit: March 28, 2013, 08:44:47 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #598 on: March 28, 2013, 10:31:36 pm »

Ha! - I think you've been confusing it with Temazepam. You haven't been eating from the secret store again? I've told you before to keep away from that cupboard.
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« Reply #599 on: March 28, 2013, 10:36:51 pm »

Ha! - I think you've been confusing it with Temazepam. You haven't been eating from the secret store again? I've told you before to keep away from that cupboard.

Isn't that the way to Narnia?
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