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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 208306 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1575 on: December 05, 2020, 09:03:26 am »

OK. I have another brand for the Mexican list. It's a brand of ice, actually. "Iglú" ice has been commercially sold since 1904 when the company was founded by Pedro Bang in Mexico City, and pushed forward by his son, Tomás Bang Chavarría in the 1930s before refrigeration became widespread.

https://hieloiglu.mx/


The brand enters the list since the Mexican SP period guess up to 1910 at the start of the Mexican Civil War.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2020, 09:09:54 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1576 on: December 14, 2020, 04:18:33 am »

And again, Mexican historian Irene Barcenas (@barcenairene in Twitter), gives us another brand for the Mexican list, with a bit of history that needs to be expounded on - needs research, on other words.

Mexican General and Republic President, Manuel González, had a colorful background as an unlikely impresario. González fought as a lieutenant in the Mexican American War in the 1840s, and later as a general under the command of Porfirio Díaz against the 2nd French Intervention in the 1860s. After his term in office as president of the republic (1880—84), González invented a water purification method which led him to establish the "Electropura" bottled water company in 1890.


Over the years the brand would be purchased by foreign interests and merged with newer brands such as Santorini water, founded in 1994. The brand name Electropura is still used for large water bottles, such as those used for office coolers, but in 2004, in the midst of the internet age, the brand name is updated to "e'pura"

https://epura.com.mx/development/productos/epura/




« Last Edit: December 14, 2020, 06:39:59 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Mercury Wells
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« Reply #1577 on: December 16, 2020, 06:33:04 am »

UK/Empire list:-

Ringtons Tea  Est. 1907

Yea or Nay?
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Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

The Ministry of Tea respectfully advises you to drink one cup of tea day...for that +5 Moral Fibre stat.
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« Reply #1578 on: December 16, 2020, 12:05:47 pm »

Yay!
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Steampunk Widgets and Icons of Some Worldwide Repute
Mercury Wells
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« Reply #1579 on: December 20, 2020, 01:10:44 am »

UK& Empire list:-

Cartwright & Butlers Est. 1900's
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RJBowman
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« Reply #1580 on: December 25, 2020, 05:59:34 pm »

I didn't want to create a new thread for this, and it didn't seem to fit anywhere else.

Here's a 1918 photo of what is described as a self-service grocery store:



The turnstyles seem to be anti-theft devices.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1581 on: December 26, 2020, 01:23:40 pm »

I'd love such a super market today. Which country and location?
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #1582 on: January 17, 2021, 10:35:33 pm »

US list:-

Entennman's est. 1898. (i don't think this one is on the list?)
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1583 on: January 18, 2021, 11:44:26 am »

US list:-

Entennman's est. 1898. (i don't think this one is on the list?)


Yes it is actually, on the "Updated" list of page 41 (http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,35567.msg973945.html#msg973945)

I really need to update that list It's been more than 4 years!
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #1584 on: February 04, 2021, 05:51:13 am »

UK list:-
Warren Butchers and Graziers 1800.
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E.J.MonCrieff
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« Reply #1585 on: February 05, 2021, 12:21:57 am »

Bass Beer has been mentioned in this thread, but no-one (as far as I can tell) has mentioned that their Red Triangle was the first entry on the British Trademarks Register, and is still enforced today. 

Two bottles can be seen on the counter in Edouard Manet's Bar at the Folies-Bergère

https://www.manet.org/images/gallery/a-bar-at-the-folies-bergere.jpg

I think the bottle of Crême-de-Menthe might still be available, too
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #1586 on: February 17, 2021, 02:27:07 am »

UK/Empire:-

Warrens Bakery Est. 1860 (The oldest Cornish pasty makers in the world)

Mexico:-

La Vasconia Bakers Est. 1868

« Last Edit: February 17, 2021, 02:16:15 pm by Mercury Wells » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1587 on: February 17, 2021, 08:21:51 pm »

UK/Empire:-

Warrens Bakery Est. 1860 (The oldest Cornish pasty makers in the world)

Mexico:-

La Vasconia Bakers Est. 1868



Great find Wells! That's one of those shops that remains tucked around a corner and everyone takes for granted. But can't find that without some journalism, in this case from El Universal newspaper (in English, no less). Good show! The only question is how widespread their name is. I don't think that for my lists I require a nationwide presence. Blame it on the United States which is so big that many brands are only found regionally.
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #1588 on: February 18, 2021, 06:54:19 am »

Wilhelm, my dear did you ever come across "Cornish Saffron Buns", while growing up in Mexico? (I know that Cornish miners settled in Real Del Monte)
« Last Edit: February 18, 2021, 06:56:22 am by Mercury Wells » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1589 on: February 18, 2021, 09:07:39 am »

Wilhelm, my dear did you ever come across "Cornish Saffron Buns", while growing up in Mexico? (I know that Cornish miners settled in Real Del Monte)

I'm afraid not, because it's a fairly isolated mining town in the State of Hidalgo, which is not to say that they're not there, because they could have changed their name outside of the town in Hidalgo or elsewhere. British immigrants were some of the few monolithic groups to settle in industrial towns in Mexico, comparable to German migrants in Mazatlán, and so the dishes would first spread along fellow expatriates, as opposed to French and Austrian food which were forcibly introduced during the 19th century (and thus well known and spread in the country). For example, in the northern town of Mexicali bordering California, you have descendents of Chinese railroad workers. They've developed their own Sino-Mexican brand of fusion cuisine, which you can only find there. On the other hand, Cornish pasties are extremely similar to Mexican Empanadas de Res (Beef Empanadas) , and I don't doubt for a minute that they could have spread out from Hidalgo. It's just hard to prove the origin.

It's a matter of doing research. In the 19th century Mexico was like a sponge absorbing all sort of non-Spanish European foods. Could the dish be in Mexico City? That's the other concentration of British nationals in the country, but probably not mostly Cornish, so it's less likely. Often times particular foods will change names or inspire new local dishes. Other times, dishes don't make it across state lines and fail to spread across the country. I've been surprised to learn about many local dishes on You Tube that apparently are very well known in their region, but I've never heard about. I guess living for 17 years there, and a first language still don't entitle you to know all of the cultural aspects of the country. What I know is that Cornish Pasties in their original form and name definitely are a local food in the town and they even have a festival around them, according to wiki!
« Last Edit: February 18, 2021, 09:57:10 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #1590 on: February 18, 2021, 05:18:27 pm »

i no longer know which brands have or have not been mentionned yet...

some dutch ones

Douwe Egberts koffie (coffee)
Droste chocolade (chocolate nowadays, started off selling cocoa powder)
Peijnenburg (bakery, now famous for their ontbijtkoek, kind of likie gingerbread)
Unox (butcher, now a huge company that owns a lot of stuff but is famous for their sausage)

some others
AG barr, you know, the company that makes irn bru
tunnock's
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1591 on: February 18, 2021, 08:06:17 pm »

i no longer know which brands have or have not been mentionned yet...

some dutch ones

Douwe Egberts koffie (coffee)
Droste chocolade (chocolate nowadays, started off selling cocoa powder)
Peijnenburg (bakery, now famous for their ontbijtkoek, kind of likie gingerbread)
Unox (butcher, now a huge company that owns a lot of stuff but is famous for their sausage)

some others
AG barr, you know, the company that makes irn bru
tunnock's


Yes indeed! I think most of what you mention has not been included. I'm not sure about AG Barr. The only solution is to read all the pages and compile the names, because on the mainland European side we never had a written list. And even my lists are grossly behind in updates. I have to re-read at least half of the thread!
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #1592 on: February 18, 2021, 09:07:50 pm »

Euro list:-

Douwe Egberts has been mentioned.

Droste chocolade 1863
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #1593 on: February 21, 2021, 02:46:55 am »

Wilhelm...what do you think, would be the last possible year of SP era in Centeral & S. Americia?
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1594 on: February 21, 2021, 09:11:09 am »

Wilhelm...what do you think, would be the last possible year of SP era in Centeral & S. Americia?

Good question. I have never really given it a thought.

Let me start by re-stating the one Latin American country for which I have defined a Steampunk Era . For "Spanish North America" (Mexico) the period either starts in the 1860s, when the French invade and install Maximilian, because it overlaps with the American Civil War, and there's some limited interaction with the United States, and I call this the Extended Steampunk Period (allows meshing of military history to European Steampunk Era), and otherwise it can be defined as a proper "Industrial Steampunk Period" starting with the term of President Porfirio Díaz in 1876 enveloping the introduction of locomotives, massive migration from Europe and ending concurrently with the end of the Mexican Civil War, 1920. Since Mexico participated in WWII, their Diesel Period ends on 1945.

Mexico Extended Steampunk Period, 1864-1920,
Industrial Steampunk Period, 1876-1920
Diesel Period, 1920-1945

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The dates for South America parallel Mexico's somewhat, but the start is more sketchy and arbitrary. Several nations Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Perú had a common independence history and a series of internal conflicts as civil wars, which ended with a unified country of Argentina in 1862. Afterwards you see wars between these countries, where territories were defined and they begin to diverge in 1880 when the Argentine armed forces turn inward under President Julio Argentino Roca to fight the natives, clearing land in the desert, which allowed massive migration from Europe to take place.

It is at that point that railroad technology came in force (it had been introduced in the 1860s), and Argentina's economy boomed with exports, making a wealthy nation way above other Latin American nations until 1916, when the last president of their prosperous Era was elected (the tenure of President Hipólito Yrigoyen ended in 1930 with a crisis brought about by the US Great Depression, thus ending explosive growth.) So I'll define the end as 1916 (but 1918 is valid, I think on a cultural basis). Since Argentina was the most influential Spanish speaking country in the region, I'll say that should be the date for smaller Spanish speaking countries outside of Brazil, which is culturally different, and Mexico which is in North America. Afterwards, that would be their Dieselpunk Period, which includes the first tenure of Juan Domingo Perón until 1951.

For South America (except Brazil)
Extended Steampunk Period 1862 - 1916/18
Industrial Steampunk Period, 1880-1916/18,
and 1918-1951 is the South American Dieselpunk Period.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For Brazil, you also have two possible start dates, an extended Steampunk Period and an Industrial Steampunk Period, when the nation begins to look more modernized.

The Extended Steampunk Period starts during civil wars and uprisings against monarchy in which a European insurrectionist, namely Giuseppe Garibaldi was lending support to the cessesion movement in Brazil. At the time, Brazil was a monarchy started by a prince of Portugal, Prince Pedro de Alcantara, who became Regent of Brazil, in 1821, and Emperor of Brazil, Don Pedro I in 1822, after declaring independence from Portugal. The relevant war of cessesion where Brazil interacted with Garibaldi would be the  "Ragamuffin War" (Portuguese: Guerra dos Farrapos or, more commonly Revolução Farroupilha) in 1835. Garibaldi joined the war in 1836.

The Industrial Steampunk Period probably starts when King Dom Pedro II was deposed by a military junta in November 1889 (In 1893 the first civilian republican government was established).

Brazil participated in WWI, which means that without another major conflict or political change, 1918 becomes the end of the Steampunk Era and the start of the Diesel Era. They also participated in WWII, on the Allied side, after entering a dispute with Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy, so their Diesel Period ends in 1945.

So for Brazil,
Extended Steampunk Period is 1836-1918 (rather early mostly because of Garibaldi, this is very arbitrary for me to define I can't grasp a better date, I'd prefer something in the 1860s more in line with Argentina),
Industrial Steampunk Period is 1889-1918,
and the Diesel Period is 1918-1945.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For Central America it's much more difficult to define, as they were and still are much less developed than the other two regions. However I would include Guatemala with Mexico, because during the early years after independence for a brief time Guatemala was part of Mexico.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I think that safely the end of WWI is a valid date for South America, generally speaking. Mexico was caught in a Civil War that did not end until 1920, and that extended their period, while South America could enjoy peace and listen to the newfangled jazz since 1918.

Brazilian Magazine "Para Todos" 16 July, 1927
« Last Edit: February 21, 2021, 10:42:04 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1595 on: February 24, 2021, 02:06:44 pm »

Quicke's Cheeses Est. 1540

https://www.quickes.co.uk/collections/other-cheese

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