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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 203354 times)
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #150 on: April 04, 2012, 11:12:16 am »

Wilhelm has taken the bit between his teeth, the US list goes from strength to strength and eclipses the UK list in its breadth and variety.

Frys chocolate was certainly around in the 19th C. but not the Turkish Delight which is a great pity as it is very more-ish. I could eat the chocolate covering though...

Robertson's Golden Shred Marmalade, Has anyone here not tasted marmalade?  Heavenly on cheese amazingly.


Chlorodyne exists! It is also on the list as Mr. Collis Browne's tincture the modern formulation containing morphine and peppermint oil.
Still available for the relief of coughs and diarrhoea, the female weakness, ague, &c &c. I love the stuff. The morphine is an additional bonus and is abused by some. Not many medicines that you can buy over-the-counter in the UK that contain morphine. I say, I have an idea, lets add some fizz, some sugar and serve it ice cold, it'll be one up on Coca-Cola. We could call it Poppy-Pola, Chlora-Cola or Morphi-Mola.


You should certainly add the L&P wooster sauce to the US list Mr. Wilhelm as it is well-known and used in the US.

I strongly resent the implication that Altoids are not a food. They are, of course.

Wincarnis? I  have never heard of the stuff, a meat wine? I can see why not.  I will have to do some digging.

I'd suggest to make dishes and pastry from that period. Only products would limit your inventory.
- If only, I started out by identifying the brands a steampunk gentleman would be aware of that exist to this day and I must continue along this path to the bitter end. Talking of bitters, Angostura bitters, developed as a tonic by German Dr. Johann Gottlieb Benjamin Siegert in 1824, not a food but certainly makes vile drinks more palatable. We could put some in the Morphi-mola.

Vigroids (formerly Nigroids) is the brand name of a liquorice sweet. The small black pellets are particularly marketed as an expectorant lozenge for singers, using the slogan "for clarity of voice". The product is manufactured by Ernest Jackson & Company Ltd of Crediton in Devon. In November 2010 the name was changed from "Nigroids" to 'Vigroids'.  Gosh, I hate it when they do that though I can understand why. It just makes the list but only just because of the N-change makes a difference to the brand identity.


Tunnock's Tea Cakes make the list.

We have Nestles (as we called it in the UK) already on the list always being an Anglo-Swiss entity for most of its existence, the only product from them is in the form of their condensed milk though we could probably add the chocolate safely enough. Which other of its 3,000 products was it making at that time?

Here is the UK list. Not A lot of change. Still haven't done the cheese research.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Lets add some pictures to spice up the thread. I'll drop in a few of the UK brands. Feel free to do the same.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 01:03:04 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged

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« Reply #151 on: April 04, 2012, 12:11:00 pm »

Angostura Bitters definitely belong on the list. According to the bottle I have conveniently to hand*, it has been made with the same ingredients since 1824.





*Ask not why I have a bottle of Angostura Bitters to hand. Ask instead why you do not.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #152 on: April 04, 2012, 12:16:58 pm »

Angostura - a dash turns orange juice and lemon juice mix from a St. Clements to a Chapmans at the flick of the wrist.
 
Here is a very interesting site and well presented too. There is some general food information: http://www.1900s.org.uk/index.htm
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 05:56:30 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #153 on: April 04, 2012, 12:31:51 pm »

Changing the subject slightly but I just can't help it... my excuse is that the 'un'advert looks Mildly Victorian.









Some of that 'cheese' is evident... I won't name it.

Go here to view the chappie's site : http://www.alphaila.com/articles/failure/fast-food-false-advertising-vs-reality/
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 12:39:27 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
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« Reply #154 on: April 04, 2012, 12:53:25 pm »

Colman's mustard



Lets keep the Empire going chps eh? If only it were that easy...
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #155 on: April 04, 2012, 12:58:32 pm »

Thomas Allinson wholemeal bread 1890 can go on the list



as can Allinson's flour:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #156 on: April 04, 2012, 01:10:24 pm »

Taylor's of Harrogate fine teas 1886


They have always imported coffee too, thank goodness for that...
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 01:22:01 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #157 on: April 04, 2012, 01:11:56 pm »

Lets add one of Botham’s to the list

Botham’s of Whitby Yorkshire Brack

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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #158 on: April 04, 2012, 01:15:05 pm »

Farrah's toffee 1847
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #159 on: April 04, 2012, 01:17:34 pm »

Oh my Goodness, I could eat this...

http://www.botham.co.uk/bakery/info_2_HPG01.html
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #160 on: April 04, 2012, 01:19:41 pm »

Dammit! Twiglets are 1929!!! Bludy feckin hell - sorry.
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« Reply #161 on: April 04, 2012, 02:59:41 pm »

Terry's of York - although both All Gold and the Chocolate Orange are 1930s inventions, their history stretches back to 1823.
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« Reply #162 on: April 04, 2012, 04:09:22 pm »

It's now just plain Terry's isn't it? I'll have a look-see.
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« Reply #163 on: April 04, 2012, 04:18:37 pm »

It's now just plain Terry's isn't it? I'll have a look-see.

I only specified York so you knew which company I was talking about, its now owns by Kraft and manufacture is not UK based anymore.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #164 on: April 04, 2012, 05:53:10 pm »

Yes it is a pity that the Terry's "of York" name is now a name no longer, it used to have a certain caché. I suppose it is all made in a factory these days regardless of the brand. No point in sentimentality.


The only brand that I cared for, Brakspears beer, used to have the Henley Brewery proudly displayed on all their logos but now the brewery is a hotel called "Hotel du Vin", and the beer isn't even brewed in Henley - how could they do that? The French would never move a vineyard.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 07:29:45 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
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« Reply #165 on: April 04, 2012, 05:59:01 pm »

Shepard Neame (Britain's Oldest Brewery) - 1698, based in Faversham, Kent.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #166 on: April 04, 2012, 06:31:36 pm »



McVities Digestive biscuits

Rich Tea



not quite steampunk nor victorian advertising but the earliest I could find
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 06:36:24 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
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« Reply #167 on: April 04, 2012, 06:46:48 pm »

I strongly resent the implication that Altoids are not a food. They are, of course.


My apologies uncle Bert.  Did not mean to imply it's not a food (as it already is on the food list), but in purpose at least it was originally meant for a medicinal purpose, as was Pemberton's Coca Wine (Coca Cola), which would also make the list of remedies!  They make it to both lists!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemberton%27s_French_Wine_Coca
Quote
French Wine Coca was marketed mostly to upper class intellectuals, afflicted with diseases believed to have been brought on by urbanization and Atlanta's increasingly competitive business environment. In an 1885 interview with the Atlanta Journal, Pemberton claimed the drink would benefit "scientists, scholars, poets, divines, lawyers, physicians, and others devoted to extreme mental exertion."[1][2]


OH LADIES AND GENTLEMEN! How I lament the dissapearance of San Antonio's Crystal Baking Co. Restaurant which must have closed in the 1980's.  It was a wonderful repository for Victorian-Era Food and Drink advertisements. With the interior of the restaurant resembling an inner Victorian courtyard in red brick, and with park benches, the walls over the entire restaurant were covered in Art Nouveau and Victorian decorations and often featured various extra large size wall mirrors -all real antiques dating from the late-1800's and early 1900's.  Some of those mirrors were used for parlours, pubs and pharmacies, often times depicting beautiful illustrations with female figures and products that later would become household names in the 20th. Century, like those first ads used for the promotion of that scandalous drink known as "Coca Cola", somewhat similar to the illustration below:

From Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cocacola-5cents-1900_edit1.jpg (Image has no copyright due to age)



Quote
English: "Drink Coca-Cola 5¢", an 1890s advertising poster showing a woman in fancy clothes (partially vaguely influenced by 16th- and 17th-century styles) drinking Coke. The card on the table says "Home Office, The Coca-Cola Co. Atlanta, Ga. Branches: Chicago, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Dallas". Notice the cross-shaped color registration marks near the bottom center and top center (which presumably would have been removed for a production print run). Someone has crudely written on it at lower left (with an apparent leaking fountain pen) "Our Faovrite" [sic].
The women who modeled for this artwork was Hilda Clark (1872-1932).
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 06:57:41 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #168 on: April 04, 2012, 07:14:59 pm »

Changing the subject slightly but I just can't help it... my excuse is that the 'un'advert looks Mildly Victorian.









Some of that 'cheese' is evident... I won't name it.

Go here to view the chappie's site : http://www.alphaila.com/articles/failure/fast-food-false-advertising-vs-reality/



Ha, ha!  On the same Non-Victorian-yet retro hamburger look of your "heckle ads"/"un-adverts," ha, ha, ha, comparing to BK and it looks like the manager of McD's actually 'made an effort' when specifically asked to build the same burger as shown in the photos, ha, ha!  I can see him/her making the employees go through bags in the back-room telling them to "fluff up" and "pick" the best bread slice, ha, ha, ha! ..points for effort, but not results, Ha, ha, ha!

Let me show you the original logo (still in use today) of Wendy's chain of hamburger restaurants , which was founded by Dave Thomas in 1969 (only link is provided due to copyright).  Thomas named the restaurant after his fourth child Melinda Lou "Wendy" Thomas.  The logo shows a Victorianish red-headed little girl with the legend "Old Fashioned Hamburgers"  Not quite Victorian for my taste, but a bit comforting touch, if they would only have the wits to re-decorate their restaurants accordingly! (Not impossible given that many modern establishments such as Bennigan's are based on "Pub Aesthetics" so plenty of wood and retro inspired decor inside chain restaurants is quite possible - and profitable.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Wendy%27s_logo.svg ( http://www.wendys.com/about_us/daves_legacy/ )
  


« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 07:29:48 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #169 on: April 04, 2012, 07:38:26 pm »

Redbird Peppermint Puffs from Piedmont Candy Co., Lexington, NC, in production since 1890.




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« Reply #170 on: April 04, 2012, 07:46:48 pm »

Palethorpes sausages now sold as Palethorpe Pork Farms

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« Reply #171 on: April 04, 2012, 07:58:03 pm »

The latest American list:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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« Reply #172 on: April 04, 2012, 08:01:17 pm »

Palethorpes sausages now sold as Palethorpe Pork Farms




You do realize how well we could eat by merging the lists, yes?  I'm still looking for meat product to complete my New Orleans style food...  I'd propose we start planning for the "Great Transatlantic Steampunk Feast"
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #173 on: April 04, 2012, 08:03:03 pm »

Lets have it somewhere mid-atlantic, on my submarine or your airship?
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« Reply #174 on: April 04, 2012, 08:19:16 pm »

Ladies and Gentlemen,
According to the rules of this peculiar discussion, what about persons who shall be nameless (hic!) who have SUPPLIES of the original and much stronger Chlorodyne in their petticoat pockets?
By the bye, chaps, I am already racing you to the Patent Office on my darling white Mehari racing camel for the rights to manufacture Poppy-Pep-Up.
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