Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 238095 times)

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #150 on: April 04, 2012, 10:12:16 am »
Wilhelm has taken the bit between his teeth, the US list goes from strength to strength and eclipses the UK list in its breadth and variety.

Frys chocolate was certainly around in the 19th C. but not the Turkish Delight which is a great pity as it is very more-ish. I could eat the chocolate covering though...

Robertson's Golden Shred Marmalade, Has anyone here not tasted marmalade?  Heavenly on cheese amazingly.


Chlorodyne exists! It is also on the list as Mr. Collis Browne's tincture the modern formulation containing morphine and peppermint oil.
Still available for the relief of coughs and diarrhoea, the female weakness, ague, &c &c. I love the stuff. The morphine is an additional bonus and is abused by some. Not many medicines that you can buy over-the-counter in the UK that contain morphine. I say, I have an idea, lets add some fizz, some sugar and serve it ice cold, it'll be one up on Coca-Cola. We could call it Poppy-Pola, Chlora-Cola or Morphi-Mola.


You should certainly add the L&P wooster sauce to the US list Mr. Wilhelm as it is well-known and used in the US.

I strongly resent the implication that Altoids are not a food. They are, of course.

Wincarnis? I  have never heard of the stuff, a meat wine? I can see why not.  I will have to do some digging.

I'd suggest to make dishes and pastry from that period. Only products would limit your inventory.
- If only, I started out by identifying the brands a steampunk gentleman would be aware of that exist to this day and I must continue along this path to the bitter end. Talking of bitters, Angostura bitters, developed as a tonic by German Dr. Johann Gottlieb Benjamin Siegert in 1824, not a food but certainly makes vile drinks more palatable. We could put some in the Morphi-mola.

Vigroids (formerly Nigroids) is the brand name of a liquorice sweet. The small black pellets are particularly marketed as an expectorant lozenge for singers, using the slogan "for clarity of voice". The product is manufactured by Ernest Jackson & Company Ltd of Crediton in Devon. In November 2010 the name was changed from "Nigroids" to 'Vigroids'.  Gosh, I hate it when they do that though I can understand why. It just makes the list but only just because of the N-change makes a difference to the brand identity.


Tunnock's Tea Cakes make the list.

We have Nestles (as we called it in the UK) already on the list always being an Anglo-Swiss entity for most of its existence, the only product from them is in the form of their condensed milk though we could probably add the chocolate safely enough. Which other of its 3,000 products was it making at that time?

Here is the UK list. Not A lot of change. Still haven't done the cheese research.

:
Colman's Mustard - 1814
Harrington Cheese's Stilton (and Derbyshire) -- 1720
McVitie's Biscuits - 1830
Digestives and Rich Tea biscuits
Robertson's Golden Shred Marmalade - 1864
Twinings Tea - 1706
Bassett's Pontefract cakes - ~1760
Matthew Walker's Christmas puddings 1899
Barber's Cheddar Cheese 1833
Andrews Liver Salts - 1894
Warburtons bread - 1876
John West tinned salmon, mackerel and sardines 1857
Crosse and Blackwell chutneys and picallili 1706
Walls sausages and bacon - 1786
Walls pork pies 1786
R Whites lemonade - 1894
Idris ginger beer - 1873
Idris fizzy cream soda
Idris dandelion and baldock
Fyffe's bananas 1878
Taylor's of Harrogate tea and coffee (1886)
Irn Bru - 1901 under the name Strachan's Brew
Holland's Pies 1854
Dickinson and Morris 1851 (maker of Melton Mowbray pork pies)
Sarson's vinegar 1794
Sharwood's chutney 1889
Cerebos Salt 1894
Paxo stuffing (1901)
Hartley's jams 1871
Frank Cooper's 1874
Haywards pickles 1868
Geo. Watkins Mushroom Relish est.1830
HP Sauce 1895
Sharwoods Mango Chutney est 1889
Walkers Shortbread 1898
Suchard chocolate 1826
Atora beef suet 1893
Brown and Poulson's cornflour 1865
Borwick's baking powder 1895
Fentiman's ginger beer 1905
Coca cola 1900 (UK)
Robinson's barley water 1830
Rose's lime juice 1867
Scott's Porage Oats 1880
Perrier water 1898
Schweppes tonic 1771
Schweppes ginger ale (1870)
jacobs cream crackers 1885
oxo 1899
Carrs water biscuits 1841
Cadbury's cocoa 1824
Tate & lyle sugar 1877
Tate & lyle syrup
Tate & lyle treacle
Birds custard 1837
Bovril 1870
Golden shred marmalade 1864
Garabaldi biscuits 1861
Patum Peperium 1828
Fray Bentos corned beef 1899
Nestles condensed milk 1867
Typhoo tea 1903
Camp coffee 1876
Huntley and Palmers nice biscuits 1895
Shippams meat pastes 1896
Rowntrees pastilles 1881
Heinz beans 1886 (UK)
Jesmona Black Bullets
Jackson's of Picadilly fine teas
Tunnocks Tea cakes
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Wincarnis (mixed with Leibigs meat extract to restore the 'meatiness' !)
Nigroids


Lets add some pictures to spice up the thread. I'll drop in a few of the UK brands. Feel free to do the same.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 12:03:04 pm by yereverluvinunclebert »
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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #151 on: April 04, 2012, 11:11:00 am »
Angostura Bitters definitely belong on the list. According to the bottle I have conveniently to hand*, it has been made with the same ingredients since 1824.





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yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #152 on: April 04, 2012, 11:16:58 am »
Angostura - a dash turns orange juice and lemon juice mix from a St. Clements to a Chapmans at the flick of the wrist.
 
Here is a very interesting site and well presented too. There is some general food information: http://www.1900s.org.uk/index.htm
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 04:56:30 pm by yereverluvinunclebert »

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #153 on: April 04, 2012, 11:31:51 am »
Changing the subject slightly but I just can't help it... my excuse is that the 'un'advert looks Mildly Victorian.









Some of that 'cheese' is evident... I won't name it.

Go here to view the chappie's site : http://www.alphaila.com/articles/failure/fast-food-false-advertising-vs-reality/
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 11:39:27 am by yereverluvinunclebert »

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #154 on: April 04, 2012, 11:53:25 am »
Colman's mustard



Lets keep the Empire going chps eh? If only it were that easy...

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #155 on: April 04, 2012, 11:58:32 am »
Thomas Allinson wholemeal bread 1890 can go on the list



as can Allinson's flour:

:



yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #156 on: April 04, 2012, 12:10:24 pm »
Taylor's of Harrogate fine teas 1886


They have always imported coffee too, thank goodness for that...
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 12:22:01 pm by yereverluvinunclebert »

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #157 on: April 04, 2012, 12:11:56 pm »
Lets add one of Botham’s to the list

Botham’s of Whitby Yorkshire Brack


yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #158 on: April 04, 2012, 12:15:05 pm »
Farrah's toffee 1847

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #159 on: April 04, 2012, 12:17:34 pm »
Oh my Goodness, I could eat this...

http://www.botham.co.uk/bakery/info_2_HPG01.html

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #160 on: April 04, 2012, 12:19:41 pm »
Dammit! Twiglets are 1929!!! Bludy feckin hell - sorry.

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #161 on: April 04, 2012, 01:59:41 pm »
Terry's of York - although both All Gold and the Chocolate Orange are 1930s inventions, their history stretches back to 1823.
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yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #162 on: April 04, 2012, 03:09:22 pm »
It's now just plain Terry's isn't it? I'll have a look-see.

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #163 on: April 04, 2012, 03:18:37 pm »
It's now just plain Terry's isn't it? I'll have a look-see.

I only specified York so you knew which company I was talking about, its now owns by Kraft and manufacture is not UK based anymore.

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #164 on: April 04, 2012, 04:53:10 pm »
Yes it is a pity that the Terry's "of York" name is now a name no longer, it used to have a certain caché. I suppose it is all made in a factory these days regardless of the brand. No point in sentimentality.


The only brand that I cared for, Brakspears beer, used to have the Henley Brewery proudly displayed on all their logos but now the brewery is a hotel called "Hotel du Vin", and the beer isn't even brewed in Henley - how could they do that? The French would never move a vineyard.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 06:29:45 pm by yereverluvinunclebert »

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #165 on: April 04, 2012, 04:59:01 pm »
Shepard Neame (Britain's Oldest Brewery) - 1698, based in Faversham, Kent.

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #166 on: April 04, 2012, 05:31:36 pm »


McVities Digestive biscuits

Rich Tea



not quite steampunk nor victorian advertising but the earliest I could find
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 05:36:24 pm by yereverluvinunclebert »

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #167 on: April 04, 2012, 05:46:48 pm »
I strongly resent the implication that Altoids are not a food. They are, of course.

My apologies uncle Bert.  Did not mean to imply it's not a food (as it already is on the food list), but in purpose at least it was originally meant for a medicinal purpose, as was Pemberton's Coca Wine (Coca Cola), which would also make the list of remedies!  They make it to both lists!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemberton%27s_French_Wine_Coca
Quote
French Wine Coca was marketed mostly to upper class intellectuals, afflicted with diseases believed to have been brought on by urbanization and Atlanta's increasingly competitive business environment. In an 1885 interview with the Atlanta Journal, Pemberton claimed the drink would benefit "scientists, scholars, poets, divines, lawyers, physicians, and others devoted to extreme mental exertion."[1][2]

OH LADIES AND GENTLEMEN! How I lament the dissapearance of San Antonio's Crystal Baking Co. Restaurant which must have closed in the 1980's.  It was a wonderful repository for Victorian-Era Food and Drink advertisements. With the interior of the restaurant resembling an inner Victorian courtyard in red brick, and with park benches, the walls over the entire restaurant were covered in Art Nouveau and Victorian decorations and often featured various extra large size wall mirrors -all real antiques dating from the late-1800's and early 1900's.  Some of those mirrors were used for parlours, pubs and pharmacies, often times depicting beautiful illustrations with female figures and products that later would become household names in the 20th. Century, like those first ads used for the promotion of that scandalous drink known as "Coca Cola", somewhat similar to the illustration below:

From Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cocacola-5cents-1900_edit1.jpg (Image has no copyright due to age)



Quote
English: "Drink Coca-Cola 5¢", an 1890s advertising poster showing a woman in fancy clothes (partially vaguely influenced by 16th- and 17th-century styles) drinking Coke. The card on the table says "Home Office, The Coca-Cola Co. Atlanta, Ga. Branches: Chicago, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Dallas". Notice the cross-shaped color registration marks near the bottom center and top center (which presumably would have been removed for a production print run). Someone has crudely written on it at lower left (with an apparent leaking fountain pen) "Our Faovrite" [sic].
The women who modeled for this artwork was Hilda Clark (1872-1932).
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 05:57:41 pm by J. Wilhelm »

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #168 on: April 04, 2012, 06:14:59 pm »
Changing the subject slightly but I just can't help it... my excuse is that the 'un'advert looks Mildly Victorian.









Some of that 'cheese' is evident... I won't name it.

Go here to view the chappie's site : http://www.alphaila.com/articles/failure/fast-food-false-advertising-vs-reality/


Ha, ha!  On the same Non-Victorian-yet retro hamburger look of your "heckle ads"/"un-adverts," ha, ha, ha, comparing to BK and it looks like the manager of McD's actually 'made an effort' when specifically asked to build the same burger as shown in the photos, ha, ha!  I can see him/her making the employees go through bags in the back-room telling them to "fluff up" and "pick" the best bread slice, ha, ha, ha! ..points for effort, but not results, Ha, ha, ha!

Let me show you the original logo (still in use today) of Wendy's chain of hamburger restaurants , which was founded by Dave Thomas in 1969 (only link is provided due to copyright).  Thomas named the restaurant after his fourth child Melinda Lou "Wendy" Thomas.  The logo shows a Victorianish red-headed little girl with the legend "Old Fashioned Hamburgers"  Not quite Victorian for my taste, but a bit comforting touch, if they would only have the wits to re-decorate their restaurants accordingly! (Not impossible given that many modern establishments such as Bennigan's are based on "Pub Aesthetics" so plenty of wood and retro inspired decor inside chain restaurants is quite possible - and profitable.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Wendy%27s_logo.svg ( http://www.wendys.com/about_us/daves_legacy/ )
  


« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 06:29:48 pm by J. Wilhelm »

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #169 on: April 04, 2012, 06:38:26 pm »
Redbird Peppermint Puffs from Piedmont Candy Co., Lexington, NC, in production since 1890.




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yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #170 on: April 04, 2012, 06:46:48 pm »
Palethorpes sausages now sold as Palethorpe Pork Farms


J. Wilhelm

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #171 on: April 04, 2012, 06:58:03 pm »
The latest American list:

:

H.J. Heinz Company  (Henry John Heinz, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, 1888;  US company already mentioned in the UK for baked beans and ketchup)

Hunt's (rival tomato ketchup maker, fmr. Hunt Bros. Fruit Packing Co, 1888, Sebastopol California).

Campbell’s Soup Co. fmr. Joseph Campbell & Co. (International food giant making condensed soup, f. 1869 Joseph A. Campbell, Camden New Jersey)

McCormick & Co. spices (International spice trade giant today, Willoughby M. McCormick, 1889, Baltimore, Maryland)

Del Monte Foods (canned vegetables/produce international giant today, 1886, Oakland/San Francisco, California)

Nabisco (Baked foods international giant today. "National Biscuit Co." Yes-please take note!! "biscuit" in the British sense of the word, 1898 East Hanover New Jersey)
From Wiki, a timeline relevant to Nabisco:
Quote
# 1792 – Pearson & Sons Bakery opens in Massachusetts. They make a biscuit called pilot bread consumed on long sea voyages.
# 1801 – Josiah Bent Bakery first coined the term 'crackers' for a (savory) crunchy biscuit they produce.
# 1889 – William Moore acquires Pearson & Sons Bakery, Josiah Bent Bakery, and six other bakeries to start the New York Biscuit Company.
# 1890 – Adolphus Green starts the American Biscuit & Manufacturing Company after acquiring forty different bakeries.
# 1898 – William Moore and Adolphus Green merge to form the National Biscuit Company. Adolphus Green is president.
# 1901 – The name Nabisco is first used as part of a name for a sugar wafer.

General Mills, (Baking ingedients/ baked goods /canned goods super-giant, Minneapolis, Minnesota,1866 by Cadwallader C. Washburn who bought and expanded the 1856 Minneapolis Milling Company)

C.A. Pillsbury and Company (Flour and a plethora of baking/baked goods. 1872 by Charles Alfred Pillsbury / John Sargent Pillsbury, Minnesota)

King Arthur Flour (Henry Wood & Co. 1790)


Jell-O (instant gellatin, Peter Cooper, 1845 / Pearle B. Wait. 1897, New York)

Coca Cola (soft-drink international giant today, John Pemberton/Eagle Drug and Chemical Company, Columbus, Georgia 1886)

Dr. Pepper (1885 by Charles Alderton of Waco, Texas.  Presently owned by Dr.Pepper-Snapple in US. and distr. By Shweppes,Pepsi, or Coca Cola in Americas and Europe, including UK (?) -don't ask me...)

Hormel Foods Corporation (-maker of Spam, BTW- George A. Hormel & Company in Austin, Minnesota, 1891)

Log Cabin syrup (1887. Patrick J. Towle, Minnesota)

Aunt Jemima pancake mix (1889, Chris L. Rutt . Charles G Underwood, St. Joseph, Missouri)

Knox gelatine (Knox Gelatin Co., founded by Rose Knox, New York, 1890)
Libby's (Libby, McNeill & Libby, canned meats company, 1869, Chicago Illinois)

Lipton tea (Thomas J. Lipton Co., now making instant tea: "The scourge of tea purists" , founded by Sir Thomas Lipton, Glasgow, Scotland UK 1890 /headquarters at Hoboken New, Jersey USA, 1893 -this may be the hardest to swallow for our British friends for a variety of reasons....)

Fig Newtons (F. A. Kennedy Steam Bakery Co., 1891, Newton, Massachusetts)

Altoids mint candy digestive (introduced by Smith Kendon in 1780, sold by Wrigley and intrduced and manufacture in Chattahooga Tennesse by Wrigley))

Cream of Wheat (Porridge, Grand Forks, North Dakota, 1893)

Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co., maker of "Juicy Fruit" Chewing Gum (Chicago, Illinois, 1891)

Triscuit ("snack crackers" 1895/1903, Niagara Falls, New York).

Cracker Jack (candied popcorn/peanuts, Frederick William "Fritz" and Louis Rueckheim, Chicago, 1896)

Tootsie Roll (soft candy, 1896)
 
Kellogg Company (maker of Kellogg's Corn Flakes, invented by J.H. Kellogg, - simultaneously a brilliant medical-visionary but also a quack doctor, May 31, 1895, Sanitas Food Co. 1897 and marketed later by his brother Will Keith Kellogg, Battle Creek Michigan, 1906)

Post Cereals  (breakfast cereal fmr. Postum Cereal Co., 1895 St. Louis Missour, by C. W. Post, a patient of Dr. Kellogg, who allegedly stole the Corn Flakes recipe while at Kellogg's Sanitarium)

Tabasco Pepper Sauce (McIlhenny Company, Avery Island, Louisiana, f. by Edmund McIlhenny 1868)

Wesson Oil (1899, Wesson Oil & Snowdrift Company

Clabber Girl baking powder (Hulman & Co.,Indiana, 1899)

Mott's apple sauce (f. 1842 by Samuel R. Mott in Bouckville, New York, as apple cider and vinegar producer)

Zatarain's  ( a New Orleans style-condiment and food company, now part of McCormick. Originally a root beer company, founded by Emile A. Zatarain, Sr., 1889, New Orleans, Louisiana)
Examples of seasonings: Crab and Shrimp Boils, Creole Mustard, FishFry (Basically seasoned corn flour). Jambalaya, Dirty Rice, Red Beans and Rice, and Black Beans and Rice.  In the 20th C. and 21st. C. available as instant rice packages or ready to eat packages.

A1 Steak Sauce (developed by 1824 by Henderson William Brand, a chef to King George IV, marketed by Brand &Co. 1831, and then bought and brought to the US by  G.F. Heublein & Brothers. 1895, not in Canada until 1931)

Arm and Hammer Baking Soda (Not a food but an ingredient, Another industry giant. 1867 James A. Church; the Arm and Hammer logo represents Vulcan, the Roman god of fire and metalworking)

Barnum Animal Crackers ("Animal Biscuits" developed in Victorian times in the UK and introduced into America by Nabisco 1902- Not quite Victorian but at the "edge" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Barnum%27s_animals_examples.JPG)

The two American giant coffee makers and "nemesis of one another":

Maxwell House Coffee (1892,Tarrytown, New York named in honor of the Maxwell House Hotel in Nashville)

Folger's Coffee (The Folger Coffee Company was founded in San Francisco, California, 1850 http://www.folgers.com/about-us/folgers-history.aspx)

Morton Salt (again not a food but an ingredient.  Supergiant. The discovery of gold in California in 1849 created a huge demand for salt as fortune-seekers made the long journey west. Originally created in 1848 as "Richmond & Company," Joy Morton -whose father served as secretary of agriculture - acquired a major interest in the company in 1889 and renamed it the Joy Morton & Company. Chicago)

Keebler's cookies(biscuits) and crackers (A giant domestic baked goods company. Godfrey Keebler Bakery founded in 1853, Philadelphia Pennsylvania. The Elves (mascots) are not Victorian though)

Hershey's Chocolate / The Hershey Food, Co. (International chocolatier giant. Founded by Milton Snavely Hershey first as a candy shop in Philadelphia, which failed within six years. After trying unsuccessfully to manufacture candy in New York, Hershey returned to Lancaster Pennsylvania, where he founded the Lancaster Caramel Company, 1894).

Philadelphia Cream Cheese (a type of Petit Suisse, and also comparable in taste, texture, and production methods to Boursin and Mascarpone. First made by William Lawrence in 1872.  Founded 1880, Philadelphia Pennsylvania)

Welch's grape juice and jelly / Welch Foods Inc. (1869, Vineland, New Jersey by Thomas Bramwell Welch who invented the method used to pausteurize grape juice to halt fermentation into wine)

B. Manischewitz Company, LLC (Kosher foods, by Rabbi Dov Behr Manischewitz, 1888 in Cincinnati, Ohio)

Armour fresh pork and canned goods/ Armour and Co. (originally a slaughterhouse and meat packing company, Philip Danforth Armour, Chicago, Illinois, 1867)

Smucker's pancake syrup/ J. M. Smucker Company (Maker of fruit-based syrups, marmalades, preserves and jellies, 1897,by Jerome Monroe Smucker, Orrville, Ohio)

NECCO / New England Confectionary Company (Maker of a type of "sugar wafer" candy, 1901, Revere Massachusetts), At the edge of the Victorian period, it was created by the merger of 3 Victorian companies (1847,1848,1856).  Their claim to fame is their contribution to soldiers food rations during WWI

Nestlé S.A.  (supergiant international confectioner and chocolatier among many other foods, Henri Nestlé, Vevey, Switzerland, 1866). This is the product of the 1905 merger of baby-food companies, the Swiss Farine Lactée Henri Nestlé and the American-owned/British-established Anglo-Swiss Condensed Milk Company.

Fleischmann's yeast (Charles Louis Fleischmann, his brother Maximilian, and James Gaff in Riverside, Ohio, in 1868)

French's / French's Mustard (Condiment Co.  Founded by Robert Timothy French, 1883 Fairport, New York/1884 Rochester New York as the R T French Co.)

Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce (1838 by John Wheeley Lea and William Henry Perrins dispensing chemists from Broad Street, Worcester, UK).

Heide maker of Jujubes / Jujyfruits (Henry Heide, New York, 1869)

Redbird Peppermint Puffs from Piedmont Candy Co., Lexington, NC, in production since 1890.


J. Wilhelm

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #172 on: April 04, 2012, 07:01:17 pm »
Palethorpes sausages now sold as Palethorpe Pork Farms



You do realize how well we could eat by merging the lists, yes?  I'm still looking for meat product to complete my New Orleans style food...  I'd propose we start planning for the "Great Transatlantic Steampunk Feast"

yereverluvinunclebert

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #173 on: April 04, 2012, 07:03:03 pm »
Lets have it somewhere mid-atlantic, on my submarine or your airship?

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Re: Victorian food brands still extant
« Reply #174 on: April 04, 2012, 07:19:16 pm »
Ladies and Gentlemen,
According to the rules of this peculiar discussion, what about persons who shall be nameless (hic!) who have SUPPLIES of the original and much stronger Chlorodyne in their petticoat pockets?
By the bye, chaps, I am already racing you to the Patent Office on my darling white Mehari racing camel for the rights to manufacture Poppy-Pep-Up.
Take my camel, dear, said my aunt Camellia, climbing down from that animal on her return from high mass. The camel, a white Arabian Dhalur (single hump) from the famous herd of the Ruola tribe, had been a parting present, its saddle-bags stuffed with low-carat [sic] gold and flashy orient gems, from a rich desert tycoon. . . .